Blog : thailand

Enchanting Country Lodges in Prachin Buri

Enchanting Country Lodges in Prachin Buri

/ Prachin Buri, Thailand /

/ Story: Panalee / English version: Bob Pitakwong /

/ Photographs: Sitthisak Namkham /

Here are beautiful country lodges nestled in a verdant oasis perfect for a weekend getaway. M.L. Apichit Vudhijaya sojourned in this part of the country a decade ago. Prior to that he had been searching for a modest, relaxed home with a seaside atmosphere. But as luck would have it, he came across this piece of land on the bank of the Bangpakong River in Prachin Buri Province. Needless to say, the location was peaceful and pristine. And the rest was history.

Soon he started building his dream country lodges largely out of reclaimed timber because it wasn’t too difficult to find. The weathered look of old wood paired with the imprints of time adds gorgeous curb appeal to the home.

country lodge
The house is built of old wood recycled from old homes in the vicinity. The first floor holds a common room that doubles as lobby seating area and reading nooks. The homeowner’s residential units are on the second floor.

“I wanted to try living the local way and experience life the way locals see it. No air conditioning, no glass windows. The first building on the property was made of materials recycled from what used to be a schoolhouse.

“Window frames and shutters came from recycling warehouses on Canals 2, 4 and 16. A local master builder named “Oy” undertook to build it from scratch,” said the homeowner.

He moved in after the first building was completed, and loved every minute of it. Impressed by the peaceful environment and unhurried, bucolic lifestyle, he decided to put in a second building two years later.

country lodge

M.L. Apichit said: “I’ve got an antique-style Jacuzzi tub that was bought new from Italy. There was no room for it after our family home in Bangkok had been remodeled, so I had it shipped out here and set it up in the center of the yard.

“I put in a canopy to protect it from dead and dried leaves. After a while, it became a familiar sight, and the weather was nice. So I had a second house put in where the tub was originally.”

“The children came and stayed there, they love it, and the rest is history. Friends dropping in on us said it turned out to be a very romantic place,” he recalled.

country lodge

country lodge

House number 4 named Jakha offers seven rooms for guest lodging on the first floor overlooking a swimming pool. Upstairs holds a spacious suite.

It wasn’t long before the two houses became ill-prepared to meet increasing demands. M.L. Apichit soon decided it was time he put in a third building. The plan was to build a two-story home with a rooftop deck to take in views of the Khao Yai National Park clearly visible from miles around.

One day he came across an old home on the riverbank that was up for sale. He bought it, had it taken apart and shipped out here. The 70-year-old wooden home was given a new lease on life at a new address, this time with new roofing. Old-fashioned corrugated sheet metal made way for new terracotta roof tiles. Where appropriate, the walls were built of solid wood.

country lodge

country lodge

country lodge

The unblemished charm of rustic life represented a turning point in M.L. Apichit’s perspective towards property development. He sought advice from a close friend, Apasiri Devahastin Na Ayudhya. The two friends shared a background in the hospitality industry.

“Now I wanted four houses on the property and they would be given appropriate Buddhist names. Already a team of creative designers have come up with titles from “Kharawasa Dharma 4”, a set of four disciplines for leading a happier life. They are Sajja (truth), Thamma (freedom from greed), Khanti (patience) and Jakha (generosity).

“House number 4 has a swimming pool. I designed it with the knowledge that I had. It was a terraced house design with 8 residential units,” he added. Upon completion, the latest addition named Jakha, became the first building to be visible from the country road in front of it.

                              

The lure of a laid-back home in the countryside can be irresistible. Nature-inspired design is so charming, it’s hard not to fall in love with it. No wonder many come away impressed by the hospitality they have experienced for during their visit. The property contributes to the local economy, as workforce is hired from within the community and local products are used.

But it’s the warmth and homey feelings of these country lodges that have kept many coming back.

country lodge


Owner: M.L. Apichit Vudhijaya


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Good Old Days: A Lovely Wooden House with Panoramic Views

Country Villa Breathes in the Energy of Nature

Good Old Days: A Lovely Wooden House with Panoramic Views

Good Old Days: A Lovely Wooden House with Panoramic Views

/ Chiang Mai, Thailand /

/ Story: Patsiri Chotpongsun / English version: Bob Pitakwong /

/ Photographs: Sitthisak Namkham /

Turning left into a side street opposite Chiang Mai’s Mae Rim district bureau, rice fields on both sides of the road have matured and only just begun to bear fruit. In the middle of it, all emerged a two-storey wooden house with vintage Thai-style appeal. It stood hemmed in by tall trees and lush green lawns. This two-storey wooden house showcases a mix of concrete and timber, its wide façade looking out on a fabulous panorama of mountains and paddy fields.

wooden house
Open-back bookshelves contribute to an airy interior made for lounging, reading, and viewing pictures in the gallery.

wooden house

 

Anchan, the housedog, gave a welcome bark, followed by greetings from the mustached host, “TomApichai Wangtragul. He introduced us to his better half, “SaaNarawan Rajchasee Wangtragul, AKA the heart of the house. The Retro look of her Thai-style sarong matched the atmosphere of the home named “Good Old Days.

“Back in Lampang we had a small coffee shop offering snacks and selling guitars. It was very warm there, so we started looking for a new home in good weather. We found one on Google, not far from where we wanted to build our first home in Chiang Mai. One day that piece of land was up for sale, and we were lucky to have bought it,” Saa said.

Tom was teaching draftsmanship courses in Lampang, when they met, and the rest is history.

In Chiangmai, he designed the new wooden house after first setting up a model to determine effects of different building orientations at various times of day. He kept track of amounts of sun and natural air circulation and used the information to aid in the design.

The result was a home that fit in well with its natural surroundings and weather conditions.

As he puts it, “The home facing west gets a full dose of afternoon sun. The glare can be felt, no doubt, but the trade-off is worth it.

Panoramic sunsets can be seen every day.” To solve the problem, he has put in moveable latticework, which reduces the sun’s harsh glare.

wooden house
The kitchen counter boasts naked concrete finishes similar to those found in coffee shops.

wooden house
A draftsman’s desk sits by the window that opens to take in cool breezes and views of the surrounding landscape.

“I grew up in a wooden house on the water’s edge. I told him I wanted one with a shed roof made of corrugated sheets just like old times,” Saa recalled.

“Tom said that could not be done. So we built our new home using metal sheet roofing instead. I wanted doors with plantation shutters and places to showcase collectibles that we have cherished for a long time.”

Tom made sure his loved one got what she wanted. He searched and found reclaimed timber in Sanpatong and paired them with old wood imported from Lampang.

The timber supplies included Burma padauk wood, ironwood, and teak. The couple sought blessings for peace and prosperity before every piece was put to good use.

Apart from carpentry details, Tom is passionate about modern style with an emphasis on naked concrete finishes. Together they make the building feel light.

The interior living spaces are light and naturally ventilated, thanks to plenty of openings on all sides. Each function area is clearly defined with floating furniture for easy updates.

This design concept applies to the sofa in the living room and the dining table by the rear windows. The kitchen comes fully equipped, as their house becomes a home-stay destination.

The couple does everything in-house from selecting natural ingredients to preparing indigenous meals. It is attention to details and good health practice that keep customers coming back.

wooden house

wooden house

Tom’s hobby projects have been the source of many décor items.
Triple-shutter design : In the Northern region, the window with three shutters in a row is generally preferred for cost effectiveness. The ingenious design needs only one latch to lock all three windows.

Tom keeps a collection of vinyl records for sentimental reasons. He likes listening to relaxing music on the old-fashioned phonograph while Saa cooks. Some of it is rare on this day and age. Here time goes by so slowly that it seems stuck in history.

The floor plan features a flight of stairs made of concrete and wooden steps. Located in the center, it keeps the two bedrooms on the first floor a good distance apart for added privacy. There are cabinets where old books and other collectibles are neatly kept. Nearby stands a gallery made for lounging, reading, and viewing pictures on the wall.

The second floor offers two good-sized bedrooms : one for guest accommodations, and the other for the couple’s exclusive use. There are antique beds in all of the bedrooms. Saa said she felt good about them knowing they came from good homes. She bought them direct from their previous owners. Between the two rooms stands an office space, where Tom spends time working at his draftsman desk. The workspace is bedecked with collectibles including old cameras and vinyl records.

As Saa puts it, “This is the wooden house that strikes the right balance for the two of us. It effectively chronicles our love story and journey through time. I am just happy being here.

“Chiangmai is such a delightful place, with canals, plenty of water, trees, and beautiful culture. During the period from November to February, our house becomes a home-stay destination.

Known as “Good Old Days,” the house has become a wholesome getaway for like-minded people. The service is not available during summer months, because we don’t use air conditioning. Time is well spent in the great outdoors.


Owner/Designer: Apichai Wangtragul


 

An Open, Airy Home with Privacy in Nakhon Pathom

An Open, Airy Home with Privacy in Nakhon Pathom

/ Nakhon Pathom, Thailand /

/ Story: Ajchara Jeenkram / English version: Peter Montalbano /

/ Photographs: Soopakorn Srisakul /

Comfort, safety, and privacy were the primary considerations in designing this house. Spacious, cool and airy, it fits right into its Nakhon Pathom city neighborhood.

home nakhon pathom

“Coming back exhausted from work, the owner feels he’s escaped to the other side of a wall where he can finally relax with family in an inner sanctum hardly at all visible from outside.” Meechai Jaroenphon, architect from the Backyard Architect Co., Ltd., says the family wanted a lot of privacy for their home, which accounts for the dense concrete fence, broken only by a few narrow slots.

home nakhon pathom
The house entry area next to the carport.

The property holds three houses with a connecting court in between. There’s the main house where the owner lives, a second house for his siblings, and at the very rear is the parents’ house.

The idea was to live together as a big family while still having privacy. At the architect’s suggestion the homes are compact, leaving a large common space for a garden they work together, which adds a warmer, more intimate atmosphere.

Meechai goes on to say, “The owner wanted the different homes to be set at different levels, with stairs of different heights. I took this a step further and designed stairways as connecting elements, primarily using wood for its simplicity and warmth.”

The owner’s outside staircase.

home nakhon pathom

home nakhon pathom

Stairways connect the three buildings, and going up or down each time brings us into the private space of a different family unit. Sometimes there’s more functionality involved: the stairway in front of the first house, for instance, has a frame of steel and wood railing which screens the view from outside.

Although privacy is important, there are also openings to facilitate sun and wind coming in. “I had in mind the concept of a “safe house,” says Meechai.

“So I designed the carport to block a house view, but the buildings are open to the breezes. When the owner comes home exhausted from work he enters a cool, comfortable atmosphere, escaping into his very own world.”

home nakhon pathom

home nakhon pathom

The altar room is a common area where the parents come to pray and make merit every day. Set at the highest point, it’s larger than other rooms, and divides into two sections: a meditation room and a sitting room. The walls here are open on three sides for an open, airy ambience.

As you can imagine, it’s quite a challenge to create a home for people of different ages to live close to each other. Good design has to anticipate actual usage and find solutions for each person. This house in Nakhon Pathom is a real success story in that way: the big family really enjoys living together.

The house fence and carport wall have 10 cm. slits allowing a view outside.

Materials used in the house: teak, Makha wood, brick, marble, mosaic tiles.

Architect: Meechai Jaroenphon of Backyard Architect Co., Ltd.


Visit the original Thai article…

บ้านซ่อนตัว


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TATHATA: A Lanna Wooden Home Oozes Old World Charm

TATHATA: A Lanna Wooden Home Oozes Old World Charm

/ Nan, Thailand /

/ Story: Wuthikorn Sut / English version: Peter Montalbano /

/ Photographs: Rithirong Chanthongsuk /

Looking back on former times for inspiration? Here’s a laid-back wooden home reminiscent of what life was like in Lanna, an ancient kingdom that’s present-day northern Thailand and vast swaths of countryside now part of Myanmar and Laos. As an expression of love for simple rural life, the homeowners named it “Tathata” in the vernacular of the region meaning “just the way it is”.

Lanna wooden house

The house was built based on local traditions of the distant past. It has a pleasant, relaxed and chic open-concept space with a nice cool breeze blowing all day long through its exquisite form. Plus, harmonious lines and distinct finishes boast the charm of eco-friendly Lanna craftsmanship.

“We’re Bangkok people, but love the atmosphere and way of life here in Nan. After coming to work at Nan Hospital, we decided to live here and looked around for where to build until we finally found this property,” says Natthathon Kharaphongsathaphon, who owns the house with Jittraphon Khwamkhnueng.

Lanna wooden house
Double walls with alternating slats sliding open and closed to control airflow.

The house sits on a road convenient to Nan Hospital, in a quiet natural setting by the water’s edge. For design, the owners hired Nanthaphong Lertmaneethawisap, of Arsomsilp Community and Environmental Architect Co., Ltd. as the project’s architect.

Lanna wooden house

Lanna wooden house
The “tai thun” (open underfloor space at ground level) acts as the guest reception area connected to the kitchen.
Lanna wooden house
A wooden porch connecting the father’s bedroom to the carport is designed to be wheelchair accessible when needed in the future.

The architect said, “The owners liked the cultural and artistic dimensions of life in Nan, as well as its traditional wooden architecture. This house is only a few kilometers from the city, but in a perfect natural setting, easy breezes blowing around the clock.

“From the beginning, the words “Little House in the Big Woods” popped into my head. The doctors and I agreed we should take special care of the plants on the property, and we managed to preserve all the trees.”

The homeowners wanted the new design to use carefully selected old wood in ways that would preserve traditional Lanna craftsmanship. So all materials were taken from five traditional houses around Nan Province. They had the imprints of time and a lot of colorful history among them.

The traditional open space beneath the house, or “tai thun,” was designed for receiving guests with a deck connecting it to the kitchen and other sections of the house. The area around the stairwell is open, so light comes in from above. Walking up, you first come to the altar room, then a living area, and furthest in, the bedrooms.

Lanna wooden house
The stairwell connects all sections of the house.
Compact bedroom ideas for father and mother.

Lanna wooden house

“We tried to make the house airy and open while providing for privacy, safety, and a clear division of space according to use,” said Natthathon.

“Towards the end while supervising the work, I started to learn the craft techniques. I sawed wood, used a chisel, and sharpened bars myself. I even did some of the kind of self-reliant agriculture everyone used to do, raising ducks, geese, and chickens, even growing a vegetable garden.

“Doing this was a revelation: it was entertaining! And it all takes physical effort, so there’s no need to go to the gym.”

Lanna wooden house

All told, it’s a home that successfully applies traditional Lanna themes to present-day life. It’s a dream home that has become a reality in the natural environment of Nan, somehow seeming ordinary while being as beautiful a home as we’ve seen.

Lanna wooden house
Natthathon Kharaphongsathaphon and Jittraphon Khwamkhnueng with their dream Lanna wooden home.

Owner: Natthathon Kharaphongsathaphon, Jittraphon Khwamkhnueng

Architect: Nanthaphong Lertmaneethawisap of Arsomsilp Community and Environment Architect (arsomsilp.ac.th)

Interior Designer: Preeyachanun Saisakaret


Visit the original Thai article…

บ้านตถตา บ้านไม้ บนรอยเท้าของชาวล้านนา


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Tea Café, Choui Fong Plantation, Chiang Rai Province

Tea Café, Choui Fong Plantation, Chiang Rai Province

Choui Fong Plantation in Chiang Rai is a popular landmark for travelers. In 2016 its Tea Café was awarded a citation of excellence in the commercial and office building category by The Association of Siamese Architects under Royal Patronage (ASA).

/// Thailand ///
Story: Wuthikorn Suthiapa /// Photography: Sitthisak Namkham /// Designer: Idin Architects

The building’s left wing holds a shop filled with tea-related products.
Buildings split off radially for a panoramic view of mountains and fields.

 

                                                                                         

Sit and sip tea with a 360-degree view.

If you have the good fortune to visit Doi Mae Salong, Chiang Rai Province, source of Thailand’s high-quality tea, you’ll pass through Mae Chan District. This is home to the Choui Fong Plantation, an enormously popular local tourist landmark. Besides the beautiful tea field landscape spreading as far as the eye can see, you’ll also find the truly chic Choui Fong Tea Café, in 2016 recipient of an architectural award from the Association of Siamese Architects.

The Choui Fong Plantation had been in tea leaf production long before its second-generation heir, Ping (Chanya Wanatsapithaksakul) made the improvements that put it on the agricultural tourism map, with a shop and stalls distributing many of his products and the café, which offers pastries and high-quality tea-based drinks. The delicious tastes and smells are enhanced by the setting: the ingenious architectural design of IDIN Architects which seems to spring right out of its gorgeous natural surroundings. The rectangular concrete structures, split into three interconnecting wings. are built into the hill at the highest point in the fields. Elegant by themselves, they are even more so in the context of nature. Visitors can walk around the hilltop roof and enjoy a 360-degree vista of tea fields, or look out from the lower deck while relaxing with tea and pastries, which can also be bought at the store.

Visitors walk down from the hilltop to enter the café complex.
With only a single post supporting each wing, the buildings seem light, as if floating midair.
Tea can be enjoyed on both the roof deck and the lower level.

Tea aficionados love the simple décor: pine wood gives a serene look which goes well with the scents and tastes, and all the building materials – steel, concrete, wood – retain their natural textures, bringing to bear the tea-drinking cultural values of honesty and simplicity, attracting both experts and amateurs into the tea world in all its depth.

Sipping tea here is much more than just experiencing delicious tastes, it’s experiencing the joys of life itself.

Evening atmosphere at Choui Fong Tea Café.

 

Link : http://www.idinarchitects.com/

 

A Boutique Farm Stay in Chiang Mai

A Boutique Farm Stay in Chiang Mai

A boutique farm-stay destination in norther Thailand has provided a good example of how a business could involve the community every step of the way. It thrives on showing respect and fitting in with local ways of living. It’s secret: City and local people stand to gain from each other’s presence and coexist in peaceful harmony with nature.

/// Thailand ///
Story: Punchat /// Photography: Supakorn Srisakul, Sitthisak Namkham  /// Owner & Designer: Jak Ladpli

The farm stay offers four rooms with garden views at the rear of the building, one on each floor.

An architect from Bangkok recently started the boutique farm-stay in Mae Rim District, a 15-minute drive from central Chiang Mai. In a unique way he adapted to be in sync with the new environment and still remained very much in vogue. How did they do it? The answer can be found at the wholesome destination called “Chic 39.”

Farm stay owner Jak “Joke” Ladpli said his was an interesting piece of architecture in the middle of a lush landscape. Chic 39 is offering guest accommodation and operating in conjunction with the surrounding community. It thrives on a simple concept — Make the space modern and keep decor local.

“Call it modern local if you will,” said Joke. “As newcomers, we respect the community, its people, and their ways of life. In our hearts we are modern, kind of like a man donning business attire. But such a formal outfit would be out of place here. The contrast would be too obvious. So we chose a modern cube-shaped design, and paired it with materials that represented local values and wisdom.”

“That’s the metaphor defining our design concept. Like a business outfit made of folk fabric known as “Mo Hom,” the hotel building offers textures and finishing touches crafted of materials that are readily available locally. They include bamboo, palm tree trunks, and old-fashioned corrugated sheets.”

The farm stay involves the community in its day-to-day operations. Joke said: “In this area 4-5 villages are actively engaged in flower farming. Having done it for several generations, the growers produce cut flowers for a wide variety of decorations, from shops to hotels to even food. Especially yellow chrysanthemums, they prefer to grow them during winter months.”

Flower growers leave electric lights on at least three hours after sunset. Increased exposure to light helps flower stems grow a bit longer in time for harvesting.

At night the weather is cold, and the flower farm is aglow with colorful neon lights. “If you don’t feel like going to bed early, just hang out and enjoy the views,” Joke said, adding, “In fact, the lights are left on for a good reason. Increased exposure to light helps flower stems grow longer before they are harvested the morning after. “If you are an early riser, put on a pair of boots and go help the planters harvest some flowers.”

An Elegantly Eclectic Home: The Beauty of Diverse Styles

An Elegantly Eclectic Home: The Beauty of Diverse Styles

/ Bangkok, Thailand /

/ Story: Wannch / English version: Bob Pitakwong /

/ Photographs: Nuntiya Bussabong /

It’s arguably the variety that makes living so enjoyable. Here’s the ‘Eclectic House’, a mix-and-match interior design integrating pieces of furniture and accessories from a broad range of styles and sources. Together they give the home color, freshness and charm and, at the same time, reflect well on the homeowner’s bright and sunny personality.

Eclectic House

Architecturally speaking, the small, well-proportioned home is positioned to reap the benefits of favorable prevailing wind and light conditions, which already makes it a great place to live.

Add a gorgeous collection of furniture, and it’s hard to find a place that’s more lively and full of energy than this so-called “eclectic house” of ideas belonging to Sapsit Fungfueangchaweng, director of corporate marketing at AP Thailand.

Sapsit selected all the furniture and decorating items himself. Each of them has a story to tell that conveys a great deal about the home rich in collectibles from across the globe.

Eclectic House

Eclectic House

Upon his return from further studies abroad, Sapsit’s father decided to renovate an existing 200-square-meter guest house adjoining the family residence as a new home for his son. The two houses have a relaxed and intimate view of each other across the swimming pool.

“My home relies not so much on design as on interior décor, the arrangement of items from my collections,” Sapsit tells us.

Inside, it feels spacious and dominated by shades of white. Interior spaces – living room, workspace, dining area and a kitchen counter – are connected, but visually separated with the use of different dimensions. There’s a raised floor here, and an open ceiling over there with the gabled roof structure painted white, creating a spacious yet uniquely bounded feeling.

Standing front and center in the room is a collection of chairs in different styles matching harmoniously. Eclectic, yes, but beautiful. They fit in very well with tasteful ornamentation and the pictures that Sapsit has picked up during business and pleasure travels in recent years.

There’s a standout white sofa placed in front of one of Sapsit’s own works, a painting in blue and white. This is a spot where he likes to sit, maybe dreaming up new work, maybe just relaxing with friends.

Eclectic House
A raised floor sets the living room apart from the kitchen.
Eclectic House
Natural light shines all day long through the glass window by the studio entrance.

Sapsit used all sorts of arranging techniques to achieve a practical house plan and, at the same time, blend comfort and style. He offers a piece of advice, “In selecting what items to use, think first about function, not just decoration. Then, pick the things that have meaning, or spiritual value: they won’t become boring over time.

“Whatever selection a person makes should reflect well on his or her character, while never overlooking their function. This will result in great practical benefits and a beautiful home.”

Graphics large and small add lively highlights to this wall.

Besides his corporate marketing work, Sapsit owns the swimwear brand “Timo Trunks,” known for striking graphics with a uniquely fun and entertaining look. The brand’s products come from collaboration of Thai and foreign designers, and have developed to the point where they are distributed in more than 9 countries worldwide.

The original designs started at Sapsit’s Timo Trunks Studio, built right near his house for a super-easy work commute.

Eclectic House

Eclectic House

The outward appearance of the studio building is deceptively simple, but the space within reflects the brand’s fun-loving identity through graphics and furniture highlights amid white walls and a wood-grain floor with a bright, relaxing color scheme bringing to mind a colorfully painted canvas.

The full plate glass windows in front look outwards on a refreshing garden view, so the environment is inspiration for new ideas and the creation of great new designs.


Owner/Designer: Sapsit Fungfueangchaweng


Visit the original Thai article…

LIVING WITH COLLECTIBLE- เติมสีสันใส่ความเป็นตัวตน ในบ้านสไตล์อิเคล็กทิก


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Inspirational Office Design Ideas

Inspirational Office Design Ideas

A beautiful office can be an important element in inspiring good work. Here we give you five examples of exciting and creative office design in Bangkok.

/// Thailand ///

– Rabbit Digital Group –

An old aluminum warehouse on Banthat Thong Road now has a new and different look: its 1500 square meters of interior space now houses the chic new office layout of the Rabbit Digital Group. About 60 percent of the common area inside is reserved for a skateboard yard, ping-pong tables, snooker, a pantry, and a big communal table which can be used either for lunchtime celebrations or for brainstorming sessions where cool ideas are dreamed up, but that’s not all: everyone walking in to work passes through the chic industrial charm of this common area, and just experiencing the design is enough to unconsciously promote creative thinking. The building’s structural lines are painted black and offset by furnishings made of bright new materials: a steel stair, stainless steel slide, and natural rubber tree wood surfaces, in an open “doublespace” setting whose relaxed feeling is reinforced by living trees. It’s easy to forget this is an office!


 

– Charcoal Design –

When its old office could no longer provide needed functionality for the increasing numbers of people using it, Charcoal Design decided to relocate and renovate a 30-year-old house on a 400-square-meter property as its new workspace. Existing rooms were torn out and replaced with a spacious area that provided not only functional support for work teams, architects, interior designers, and graphic designers, but also convenient private work areas, and with enough space to accommodate a larger workforce in the future. Huge cement beams above the spacious, airy work hall reach out alongside a walkway that connects to a meeting room centered around the same glass table Company executives used in the former office. The atmosphere here is designed for the kind of ambience you might find in a bar or coffee shop, with greenery to relax the eyes.


Scaleup Architects
Scaleup Architects
Scaleup Architects
Scaleup Architects

– V Office –

The old place was just a studio, but now you’ll find V Office – of the VCAN group of companies – a workplace remarkable not only for its form inside and out, but for its unique and unforgettable character. This 5-storey building with a total space of 1,321 square meters took 3-4 months to design, and nearly a year to build. Completely redone, nothing was left of the old appearance. Now it’s open and uncluttered, with surfaces of brick and unfinished cement. The building façade features three-dimensional repetitions of the “V” motif in copper-colored aluminum composite attached to the steel building structure, creating beautiful patterns that work both to screen the sunlight and to give privacy, while giving the building its memorable standout look.


 – Baiyah Studio –

This small architectural company built its office on a 60-square-meter property with a budget of just 800,000 baht and design and construction together taking only 5 months. The primary design requirement was to reduce electrical use, so the architects took maximum advantage of natural light and ventilation. To limit dependence on air conditioning systems, circulation within the building was designed to run generally through every space and room, so heat would be released rather than trapped. There are many strategies to protect against heat entry into a building, and architects took into consideration which times different sections received more or less use, positioning bathrooms, kitchen, and reception hall as a buffer toward the west, which gets the most heat in the afternoon, to keep office areas cool and comfortable during the day. Outside, a vertical garden covers the walls, acting as natural heat insulation.


– Designqua –

Am old 5-storey Sukhumvit area row building dating back to the 1980s with double arches in front and 600 square meters of usable space has become a charming example of architectural design. Behind a unique façade long familiar to the locals, a new office hides some incredibly charming design work, the brainchild of Malina Palasthira, a talented architect with the Designqua company. Looking for a site near a SkyTrain station where work could be done for a reasonable budget while still having enough space for herself and the 8-person design team, she found this place. To make it economical, some of the space was transformed into two differently styled Airbnb rooms to accommodate intercontinental travelers. The building owner wanted to keep the “retro” building façade, but much of the cramped inside was converted into a spacious, open office. Inside is a “flying table” work desk 8.3 meters long and designed to appear as if floating in the middle of the room. Working utility systems are intentionally exposed, for an open look which shows the beauty inherent in the systems themselves.

 

 

 

 

 

5 Wooden Stilt Houses You Will Love

5 Wooden Stilt Houses You Will Love

Like a journey back in time, there is real warmth in the wooden stilt house. The eco-friendly design bespeaks the tradition and experience in the tropics. Handpicked from Living ASEAN collections, these five houses are perfect fits for hot and humid weather. Check them out.

 /// ASEAN ///

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Modern Steel House a Perfect Fit for Tropical Climate

Modern Steel House a Perfect Fit for Tropical Climate

/ Bangkok, Thailand /

/ Story: Patsiri Chotpongsun / English version: Bob Pitakwong /

/ Photographs: Rithirong Chanthongsuk /

Close to nature. All the needed conveniences for modern family life. Spacious plus great ventilation. This steel-framed home fits its hot Tropical climate perfectly.

steel house

The house stands on the same rectangular property as the old family’s home, but is split off from it. The owner is a building contractor with interior decorating experience, and so with the help of an architect friend from Office AT, he was able to build exactly the house he wanted.

steel house

“The two of us already have a lot of possessions, and will need more when we have kids,” said the owner. “This house is designed for simple, easy functionality in a nice, open space. It’s modern, easy to maintain, and has a library and rooms we can put to various uses in the future.”

steel house

Being in the construction field, the owner already had his own work team and a lot of places to get ornamental materials. Much of what was used here came from other construction sites. For simplicity and ease, the house has a cuboid structural steel frame, allowing it to be built within only four months.

For the swimming pool to be set on the north side, the house is laid out lengthwise along the southern edge of the property, which also means the narrower eastern and western walls allow less sunlight and heat inside.

Near the main entrance is a carport, and trees act as a fence in front, adding shade and blocking the view from outside.

The spacious 400-square-meter living space in this home has a downstairs with connected living room, dining room and kitchen, all with a full view out onto the swimming pool.

steel house

“Besides all the northern doors and windows opening outwards, to the northeast and northwest are spaces always open for the wind to blow in and out of the house, keeping it cool so air conditioning isn’t needed most of the day,” said the architect.

The second floor holds bedrooms. Here walls are solid on the south side, featuring built-in closets such as are also seen downstairs.

A long balcony connects all the rooms, shielded from the sun by a “double-layer skin” latticework which gives privacy while creating dimensions of light and shade.

The materials – steel, aerated concrete, unpainted brick, wood battens, eaves and floors of light-colored wood, and the unpainted pine walkway around the pool – all express a simple sufficiency.

This steel house supports a comfortable lifestyle and is completely ready to be adjusted and adapted for future needs.


Architect: Office AT Co.,Ltd. (www.officeat.com)


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