Blog : Concrete House

10 Inspiring Modern Tropical Houses

10 Inspiring Modern Tropical Houses

Living ASEAN has selected our favorite houses in the ASEAN for 2017. Of course, all of them present practical solutions for living in the hot and humid climate of Southeast Asia, including a bamboo house in Thailand, a concrete block house in Thailand and a modern tropical house in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Check them out!


THAILAND // A BAMBOO HOUSE EMBRACED BY NATURE

A bamboo house with contemporary appeal sits immersed in its natural surroundings. The home that’s also a medical clinic belongs to Nopharat Pitchanthuk MD, and his wife Kanyapak Silawatanawongse. Without question, his interest in the natural therapeutic concept is expressed in the warm, inviting atmosphere of the home office. The orthopedic doctor provides specialized care for the musculoskeletal system in the comfort of a peaceful country setting.

Read more: http://livingasean.com/house/a-bamboo-house-embraced-by-nature/

 

Concrete Block House
THAILAND // CONCRETE BLOCK HOUSE

Intanon Chantip, INchan atelier architect and owner of this HUAMARK 09 building, designed it to test theories he’d arrived at through intense study and experience. He wanted the architecture to tell its own story through the charm of materials that change over time. Intanon and his wife Tharisra Chantip bought this a 30-year-old, 80 square wa (.8 acres) property in the Hua Mark district, demolishing the old house to erect a new four-storey mixed-use building with usable space of 490 square meters and combine office, residence, and art studio.

Read more: http://livingasean.com/house/concrete-block-house/

 


VIETNAM // MODERN TROPICAL HOUSE IN HO CHI MINH CITY

The architecture of this modern tropical house in Ho Chi Minh City is perfectly suited to the hot, humid climate, with an imaginative counterpoint of plants, greenery, and airy openings keeping it shady and pleasant inside and out.

Read more: http://livingasean.com/house/modern-tropical-house/

 

Waterside Home
THAILAND // WATERSIDE HOME

This waterside tropical house brings back memories of Thai life as it was along Khlong Samsen in bygone times. From outside it looks straightforward and contemporary, but inside is a fascinating mix of antiques from the owners’ collections.

Read more: http://livingasean.com/house/waterside-home/

 

Wooden Thai House in the Lanna Tradition
THAILAND // WOODEN THAI HOUSE IN THE LANNA TRADITION

This Lanna Thai house of wood is built based on ancient local traditions. It has a simple, relaxed, and open look. Natural breezes blow all day long through its exquisite form, full of the charm of conservation-friendly Lanna craftsmanship.

Read more: http://livingasean.com/house/wooden-thai-house-in-the-lanna-tradition/

 

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MALAYSIA // BOX-SHAPED HOUSE WITH THE TEXTURE OF MEMORY

This box-shaped house uses architecture, architectural elements, and coordinated interior design to tell stories of the present and the past. The house is located in the Petalang Jaya district of Selangor, Malaysia. This is a district of single homes, but with little space to put up a large house. Still, architect Dr. Tan Loke Mun rose to the challenge of house owner Kenneth Koh and tore down the former structure here to build a new 3-storey home in its place.

Read more: http://livingasean.com/house/box-shaped-house-texture-memory/

 

Living with Cats in a Beautiful House
MALAYSIA // LIVING WITH CATS IN A BEAUTIFUL HOUSE

Ever wonder why this is a dream house for kind pet owners and their feline companions?.

“I live with my wife and our seven cats in this house,” said Chan Mun Inn of Design Collective Architects (DCA). “There used to be only four, but I adopted more cats. So I ended up with seven of them. They were the reason that we left our old apartment and built a new home in the suburb.”

Read more: http://livingasean.com/house/living-with-cats-beautiful-house/

 

Brick house For a Tropical Climate
VIETNAM // BRICK HOUSE FOR A TROPICAL CLIMATE

This rectangular brick home in Vietnam’s Ho Chi Minh City is designed for “hot and humid,” open to natural light and cool from air currents constantly streaming in and out through the bricks. Mr. Tung Do and Mrs. Lien Dinh, the owners here, are newlyweds who wanted a small house with a straightforward design for pleasant living. They had seen Tropical Space’s “Termitary House,” which won, among others, a 2016 Brick Award, and admired its form and design so much that – even with their limited budget – they engaged the Company to design and build their own home.

Read more: http://livingasean.com/house/brick-house-for-a-tropical-climate/

 

Box-Shaped House with a Tropical Style Garden
THAILAND // BOX-SHAPED HOUSE WITH A TROPICAL STYLE GARDEN

Box-shaped design highlights a perfect blend of form and function, plus an exotic Tropical style garden. The result: A lovable livable home with a panoramic view from the bedroom.

“This house was not built to be photogenic,” said Patchara Wongboonsin, architect at POAR, when asked about his outstanding design. The 350-square-meter, modern cube-shaped house took two years in the making.

Read more: http://livingasean.com/house/box-shaped-house-tropical-style-garden/

 

Modern House in a Forest Setting
THAILAND // MODERN HOUSE IN A FOREST SETTING

The architect uses clever techniques to make this modern house look like it’s crafted entirely of wood. When her family wanted to build a new house in Thailand’s Northeast, Kanika Ratanapridakul was assigned the task of project architect. It was the first time she had to work directly with local builders and suppliers. Things didn’t go as smooth as planned, but the mission was accomplished – eventually. The key to success lay in being a bit more flexible to ensure things got done right and on schedule.

Read more: http://livingasean.com/house/modern-house-forest-setting/

 

 

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10 Inspiring Modern Tropical Houses
10 INSPIRING MODERN TROPICAL HOUSES

Concrete House with an Enchanting Surprise

Concrete House with an Enchanting Surprise

Despite being seated on a small plot of land, a concrete home with elements of elegance feels spacious and airy, thanks to a Tropical courtyard landscape. Check this out.

/// Thailand ///
Story: Wuthikorn Suthiapa /// Photgraphy: Sungwan Phratep /// Style: Boonyawee Boonnak /// Design: Intanon Chantip of INchan atelier

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Back in the day when he was building this house for the most amazing person in the world — his mom, architect Intanon Chantip insisted on putting a nice, little center courtyard. “My idea is that no one wants to live alone,” he explained. “A courtyard allows people to live life well among nature. It turns a house into a vibrant dwelling place while attracting birds and bees, cats and other animals.”

After his mother passed, the house was inherited by his brother, who had never been fond of a courtyard idea. Initially he wanted to put in a roof to shelter it from storm water runoffs. But after having lived in it for a while, he had a change of heart. Like a blessing in disguise, the center yard over time transformed into a little Tropical paradise enabling him to live a refocused life embraced by nature.

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The interior boasts double high ceilings with a beautifully crafted spiral staircase on one side of the room. There are elements of unmistakable elegance manifested in the design that makes the hallway cozy and inviting. The lush center courtyard can be seen in full view both from here and from the second floor balcony.

It’s amazing how a once unpopular idea transformed into the heart and soul of a family. A center courtyard with thriving Tropical plants could very well be the first thing on your to-do list next time you plan to update your home.

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Hanging and potted houseplants turn the little courtyard into another day in paradise.
Hanging and potted houseplants turn the little courtyard into another day in paradise.

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Home of a Wood Lover / a Mixture of Wood and Concrete

Home of a Wood Lover / a Mixture of Wood and Concrete

In the midst of a verdant oasis stands a bare concrete house that blends perfectly well with a peaceful country setting.

/// Thailand ///

Story: Tawan /// Photos: Soopakorn Srisakul

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The two buildings stand in perfect harmony with nature, thanks to the raw look of bare concrete finishes.
The one-story building is used for work and entertaining houseguests. The main entryway is equipped with folding shutters that open up the entire façade to connect interior spaces to the great outdoors.
The one-story building is used for work and entertaining houseguests. The main entryway is equipped with folding shutters that open up the entire façade to connect interior spaces to the great outdoors.
The hobby lobby: The owner’s favorite hangout is the front porch, where time goes by slowly and is spent working on creative projects. It has all desirable qualities - ease of care, plenty of natural light, and good ventilation.
The hobby lobby: The owner’s favorite hangout is the front porch, where time goes by slowly and is spent working on creative projects. It has all desirable qualities – ease of care, plenty of natural light, and good ventilation.

“I used to live in the house next door. One day this home was up for sale, so I bought it because I liked the design and decorating materials. I did a complete makeover, turning it into the kind of dream home that I have had for a long time. Old house poles and full-grown trees were left pretty much intact. Upon completion, I sold the old house and then moved over here.”

A mix of furniture pieces co-exists nicely in the guest reception area. The owner’s woodwork and décor items are on display here.
A mix of furniture pieces co-exists nicely in the guest reception area. The owner’s woodwork and décor items are on display here.

The first building on the property is a one-story structure being used for work and receiving houseguests. In front of it lies a spacious terrace that is being used for carpentry work. Good ventilation and plenty of natural light combine to make the area ideal workspace. The interior is adorned with furniture and interesting decor materials crafted mostly of wood. Every piece fits in well with the raw appeal of naked concrete finishes in the backdrop. Plenty of wall openings help make the interior well ventilated and comfy all day.

The interior living space is quite airy and well lighted thanks to plenty of glass doors and windows that open generously to let natural light shine through. Meantime, lush vegetation permeates the landscape to reduce the harsh effects of solid concrete walls.
The interior living space is quite airy and well lighted thanks to plenty of glass doors and windows that open generously to let natural light shine through. Meantime, lush vegetation permeates the landscape to reduce the harsh effects of solid concrete walls.

“I designed everything myself, from basic structures to furniture to décor. I like bike riding and making road trips to see all that nature has to offer. It is about going back to the beauty of the natural habitat. Now that I own a home, I think it wise to add kind of a raw feel to it so as to blend well with the surroundings. That is the reason for choosing bare concrete finishes. I put in large windows and doors so that the garden can be seen in full view from inside,” said the owner.

Big rocks are used to make steps that connect the front porch to the garden below. Together they add a country rustic feel to the lush green setting.
Big rocks are used to make steps that connect the front porch to the garden below. Together they add a country rustic feel to the lush green setting.

Prom added that he was a big fan of DIY furniture and decorating items. Besides saving money, he could tailor every design detail to meet his specific needs. He created one-of-a kind furniture and décor items in this way. They were far from being perfect. There was unfinished look to every piece of woodwork, which further enhanced its country rustic appeal.

Twigs anchored against the rustic looking wall and furniture serve as racks for hanging hats and tchotchkes from a lifetime of carpentry. House and garden publications that are his pastime are kept here.
Twigs anchored against the rustic looking wall and furniture serve as racks for hanging hats and tchotchkes from a lifetime of carpentry. House and garden publications that are his pastime are kept here.

The second building is a big two-story residential unit. Like the first building, the main feature here is the exterior walls that are crafted of bare concrete finishes mixed with woodwork. The most stunning is the second floor balcony, which contains an opening in the floorboard that allows a Pride-of-India tree to shoot right through. It is the owner’s favorite resting space. Time goes by slowly as he sits down sipping coffee and pruning the treetop.

The owner’s creative space is a patio complete with a set of workbench and stool made out of logs left over from other projects. The coarse bark texture of the house pole in the backdrop stands harmoniously with the country rustic ambience.
The owner’s creative space is a patio complete with a set of workbench and stool made out of logs left over from other projects. The coarse bark texture of the house pole in the backdrop stands harmoniously with the country rustic ambience.

It is amazing to think about all the benefits that trees are giving us humans. Particularly at this concrete house, they provide the inspirations the owner need to feed his passion for wood. They make his small world an enchanting place to live and work.

The front porch offers plenty of space for potted houseplants, including miniature succulent gardens and bonsai trees. Beautifully decorated pottery adds appeal to the rustic style residence.
The front porch offers plenty of space for potted houseplants, including miniature succulent gardens and bonsai trees. Beautifully decorated pottery adds appeal to the rustic style residence.
A thriving Pride-of-India tree shoots right through an opening in the second floor balcony. It is the intention of the homeowner to let nature permeate the living spaces where possible.
A thriving Pride-of-India tree shoots right through an opening in the second floor balcony. It is the intention of the homeowner to let nature permeate the living spaces where possible.
There is nothing like spending the afternoon riding around on his bicycle looking for new ideas. Oftentimes he runs into something worthwhile to take home. Twigs and other found objects sometimes make great décor materials.
There is nothing like spending the afternoon riding around on his bicycle looking for new ideas. Oftentimes he runs into something worthwhile to take home. Twigs and other found objects sometimes make great décor materials.

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Set Aside for Happiness

Set Aside for Happiness

A person’s sense of proportion in creating a house to suit his own lifestyle can have energizing results. Here we visit a modern style home in Bangkok’s Viphavadi Rangsit area that illustrates this. Nutt Chenyawanit, owner of Tin Home Toy merchandise, designed this house as a reflection of his identity.

/// Thailand ///

Story: Ekkarat Laksanasamrit /// Photography: Sitthisak Namkham /// Design: Nutt Chenyawanit and Jirayut Chaiyajamrunphon

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A high gabled roof and bare concrete surfaces set at varying depths for a modern look.

From details of home décor such as galvanized iron and stylish plant containers to the overall house design, we see a modern style home that retains the flavor of tropical architecture. Open and relaxed in a Thai style reduced to essentials, with high gabled roof, extended eaves and awnings for sun and rain protection, this home has a contemporary appearance and looks fun to live in, too. Nutt explains:

“We like high ceilings; low ones feel cramped. The living room and stairwell area reaches up a full two storeys, and on the ground floor ceilings are generally three meters or higher. On the second floor ceilings follow the roof slope: bedrooms with high ceilings feel too buoyant.”

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The carport beneath an effective and attractive latticework awning that blocks sun and rain.
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The main house entrance has eaves reaching out 4 meters, both esthetic and practical.

The Tin Home Toy office building next door, built in a similar style, was here before the house and now is separated from it by a swimming pool. Nutt favors architecture with steel-based frames that give it a raw cool modern style. The metal post-and-beam design for floor and roof here made for rapid construction and quick cleanup, and presents a stylish façade of show brick walls and glass panels.

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Next to the garden a metal-frame eave filters sunlight above a rest area, keeping it cool and comfortable even in bright sunlight.
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The walkway around the house is set out in straightforward lines using low-maintenance materials such as brick.

Extended eaves and large doors and windows provide good ventilation and help the house to be comfortable for living. Metal frameworks minimize the need of support posts for the extended eaves, freeing more space for parking. High ceilings allow warm air to rise and be released through upstairs windows.

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The different textures of metal, glass, concrete, and wood mix and match well. The swimming pool is a great feature, beneficial for both home and office.
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The high-ceiling living room is open wide on two sides to catch the sun so artificial light isn’t needed.

Usable space in the house on the ground floor is made up of living room, stairwell, dining room, kitchen, and service areas like a storeroom and laundry. Upstairs consists of bedrooms and a workroom. Halls are at least 2.5 meters wide, for a spacious feel. Walking around, a visitor has the sense that each space is made for specific purpose, some for children, some for moving around in comfort, some for convenience.

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Old-fashioned shelving at the far end of the living room reaches up to the mezzanine.

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Although the ceiling is really high, it has a horizontal dimension, too, as the mezzanine is filled with built-in cabinets and bookcases.
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A small storage space by the stair for bicycles gives a hint about Nut’s spare time activity.

At first glance, a visitor might have questions about the house design, but a close look reveals a “set aside” concept that reflects the way good decisions are made in all our lives. Standard ways of doing things have a potential to limit flexibility and result in mediocrity, whereas innovations such as high ceilings can bring the sort of happiness and contentment we find in this house.

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The master bedroom is simply decorated in white and wood colors and opening out to the garden.
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Bedroom with window opening into the bathroom: open, relaxed, and good ventilation.
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Ceiling follows the roof slant in this relatively large bathroom area. Wooden shutters open directly into the bedroom.
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One side of the dining room is a food preparation area; on the other a line of windows looks out on the carport.

link: http://www.baanlaesuan.com/763/baanlaesuan/happiness-space-house/

Simple Reinforced Concrete Structure House

Simple Reinforced Concrete Structure House

Metal sheet and reinforced concrete structure plays a huge part in this box-shaped contemporary house.

/// Thailand ///

Photography : Suphakon Srisakun /// Design : Thingsmatter

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This boxlike house uses industrial materials for utility, attractiveness, and to make it stand out.
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Metal frames with exmet meshes are installed to cast a contrasting shade on the walls as well as to conceal unevenness.

Tom Dannecker (Architect) and Sawinee Buranasilapin (Designer) of Thingsmatter join force to create a functional home for a family.

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The house is set as close to the street as possible to leave more space for the garden in the back.
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Since the neighboring houses don’t make for great viewing, windows are not very large.

The main building was divided into two parallel units with a roomy space in between. The first unit includes a workroom, a food preparation area, a dining area and a living room. On the second floor is a master bedroom, a child bedroom and a playroom.

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The food preparation area, dining area, and living room are opened and connected. This is the most-used area in the house.

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The second unit was especially designed for the mother. On the first floor is a service area, a kitchen, a laundry room and a maid workroom. The second floor is reserved for relaxation. Located here are a bedroom and two spare guest rooms. Both units are connected through a walkway (and a stairway to the second floor). Attached with the walkway is a high louver panel, which is also a door to a garden.

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The large louvers on both sides improve ventilation and make the space appear roomier.
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The openings act as a frame, changing an outside view into a canvas.
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Bathroom tiles only cover up to essential areas, creating a simple look and also savvy.

The swing door can be opened to its full width at 90 degree angles, giving full scenic garden view. Even though the louvers are fixed, their large sizes and varying degrees combined make an effective ventilation system. These panels are made from white fiber cement, which is durable and goes well with the house’s rectangular design. Wired screen is attached behind the panel, to keep the mosquito out of worries.

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The unequal angles of the louvers give a sense of motion.
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Opaque sections of building walls are purposely designed for better use of indoor space.

Since the house is located in an old village, the neighborhood is not of a great view. Polycarbonate sheets are applied to solve the problem. So, other houses roof look somewhat like a blurred color shape.

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The stairway is green simply because of a preference, not to imitate the nature.

Strength and durable are strongly stressed here. Apart from reinforced concrete structure, stairs and walkways are coated with green epoxy for long-lasting use. Exmet (Expanded metal) meshes are installed on the wall around the house. Also, instead of using a laminated board for a kitchen cabinet, fiber cement board is used. It’s is not only an inexpensive choice, but also gives a simple and unpretentious look.

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Polycarbonate sheets are applied to interior window surfaces to filter sunlight and for privacy.
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When this large door is opened, the stairwell connecting the two sides of the house creates a full continuity between house and garden.

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link: http://www.thingsmatter.com/?proj=1109

The Warm Half Concrete Half Wood House

The Warm Half Concrete Half Wood House

A shingle roof emerged as we took a turn to a rural road in Ratchaburi. The warm half concrete half wood house sits gracefully amid patches of lush green rice paddies.

/// Thailand /// 

Story: Wuthikorn Suthiapa /// Photo: Soopakorn Srisakul /// Designer: Nantapong Yindeekhun

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Viewed from above, the center court features a sundeck that looks as if it were floating in midair. Lush foliage adds a touch of nature and serves as privacy curtains separating the courtyard from living spaces along the corridors. 

When being asked why building the house so far off, Nantapong Yindeekhun, the home owner mentioned his dad as his first priority. “We plan to move here to pursuit a career in farming after my dad has retired.

Nantapong and his family fled Bangkok big flood in 2011 to Ratchaburi. They has fallen in love with the place since then and decided to build a house here.

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The combined work and sitting spaces boast clean, uncluttered design with an emphasis on space optimization.
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The interior walls boast naked concrete finishes in neutral shades. 
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The mezzanine cabin bedroom comes adequately sized and boasts the rustic feel of an attic-style living space.
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One of the bedrooms features a seat by the balcony. The bed is rested on the mezzanine. 

To accommodate every family member’ needs, the house has taken up a large space. Each room is divided, but bridging together through a square-shaped corridor.

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The center court is hemmed in by a system of corridors that conveniently connects to the living spaces. Long roof overhangs protect the walkway and exterior walls from the elements.

A rock garden is situated in the heart of the courtyard alongside canopy trees. Looking from above, patches of lush foliage act as a curtain for privacy. But for the home office on the ground floor, they offer quiet, peaceful atmosphere.

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A peaceful rock garden is accessible via the house’s entryway on the ground floor. Planted trees in a good distance from one another make room for shady areas with good ventilation.

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The corridor and balcony rely on cantilever beams, which are cost effective and make good architectural sense. “I think cantilever beams are like bonuses that the main structure has to offer. They eliminate the needs for extra foundations and save time. Supported by the main structure, the balconies and corridors are 1.50-meters wide. The exterior walls sport the rustic look of old rice barn,” said the designer.

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The front façade features a stairway on the left side leading to guest reception spaces on the second floor. A series of extended eaves spread in all directions to shelter the home from rains and sun’s harsh glare.
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A private library offers plenty of reference materials and tools needed to pursue a career as a designer. Glass walls allow abundant natural light. The room is protected by wood shingle roofing.  
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The spacious kitchen makes use of clean design to showcase the natural texture of bare concrete finishes. Tile flooring in shades of black add interest to the well-ventilated space designed to make pungent odor quickly disappear. 

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For this reason, timber materials are not chemically treated. Its durability relies on the quality of the wood itself. Takhianthong (Hopea Odorata) is mainly used. This timber is used in making boat piers and can tolerate year of rains and sunshine. Likewise, concrete surfaces are left intact to bring out their true textures.

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“For the time being I am shuttling between home in the city and this country house. One day, should I grow tired of living in the city, this is the place to be. It is beautiful living out here. In the cold season, natural light is just about right, warm and comforting. You just have to see it yourself,” said the homeowner.

 

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A wood bridge leads to the serene backyard in the vicinity of the home office and the library right above it. Plans are afoot to turn this outdoor space into a garden.

After all, it is the modern meets rustic charm which makes this half concrete half wood house a warm and humble feel like no other.

link: http://www.baanlaesuan.com/28996/house/concrete/

Concrete and Steel / The Combination of The Modern House

Concrete and Steel / The Combination of The Modern House

Naked concrete walls, steel structures and cantilevered frame combined, giving the modern house striking curb appeal.

/// Thailand ///

Story: Otto Otto /// Photo: Sungwan Phratem /// Architect: Plankrich

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The 8-meter wide floor projected out in the air. It relies solely on a cantilevered frame.

This modern house plan stretch along east-west axis, which is much longer than its width. An alfresco mezzanine is built on the top of a garage by lifted a floorboard up above the ground. The thick naked concrete facade shelters a storage room and a kitchen. Together, both structures shield a living space from the glare of afternoon sun.

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The front entrance features an open space. The doorway is set aside to the left, unseen from this angle. The opening on the right side leads to a poolside wooden veranda.
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Visual continuity is created from the inside to the poolside veranda and the courtyard at the far end.

The interior features a spacious rectangular-shaped room. The white multi-purpose space is set parallel to the poolside veranda, separated by a clear glass wall. The veranda itself is protected by a concrete slab juts out roughly 2 meters from the exterior wall. The room is functioned as a pantry, a living room and a workspace overlooking a full lush landscape.

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The multi-purpose space are uncluttered and well-lit by natural light, courtesy to glass wall.

A sharp 90-degree angles turn leads to a small bedroom and a bathroom around the corner. At the farthest end lies a master bedroom, also with a poolside view.

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The master bedroom looks out to the pool, the garden, and the front yard.
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The L-shaped veranda is covered with tiles in subdued tones. The concrete slab extending from the wall acts like an awning to protects the room from the sun and the rain.

Building a modern house like this requires a well-rounded thought. It truly reflects the owner’s consideration toward future maintenance and care. And moreover, the ability to overcome challenges in design and engineering.

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link: http://www.plankrich.com/

Energy Saving Home / More than a simple house

Energy Saving Home / More than a simple house

In Kuala Lumpur, situated a stunning energy saving home with much more than meets the eye.

/// Malaysia /// 

Story: Ekkarach Laksanasamlich /// Photo: Rithirong Chanthongsuk, Soopakorn Srisakul /// Design: ArchiCentre by Tan Loke Mun 

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The airy house features clean lines with a large swimming pool under the lacy shades from the trees.

The house sits on a plot of land where an old home had been for more than sixty years. The old house was demolished, making room for the new. Here, the owner and the designer join hands to keep matured trees in the property the way they have always been.

Materials from the old house weren’t wasted. Tan Loke Mun of ArchiCenter has managed to incorporate those into the new “S11” house. Its environmental-consciousness has earned the house the prestigious platinum Green Building Index (GBI).

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The design makes use of stronger frames and larger concrete beams to avoid having too many columns in the interior living space.
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The ground floor boasts light and airy interior living space, thanks to the absence of solid room dividers. The result is visual continuity between indoor and outdoor areas.
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3-meter high ceiling makes this living space look spacious and bright. Orange brick walls pair with gray naked concrete to make the room warm and inviting.

Attention was shown in every detail. Concretes from the house were recycled, making walkways along the exterior walls. Old bricks were also given a new breath of life. Old steel windows grids were reused to reassure the security. Interestingly, old wood are also used as scaffolding during the construction due to the limitation of steel rods.

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Naked concrete finishes add a natural feel to the interior living space. Well-thought out design and choices of materials combined to make the home energy-efficient.

Built along the north-south axis, the house allows the wind to flow in to its living room. Large windows and openings reduces heat. West-facing exterior were crafted from lightweight anti-heat-absorbing material. Lush vines were grown on trellises. Five full-grown trees buffers the house from the sun in hot summer days. Extra thick insulation was applied under a metal sheet roof to prevent the heat, while chosen windows were made from low-emissivity glass.

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The first floor bedroom features simple design. The entire space is well-ventilated thanks to high ceilings and large openings in the exterior wall.
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Natural light illuminates the bathroom, creating beautiful visual effects and reducing electricity use.

To prevent heat from building up inside, the three-storey (plus a basement) house has an air duct system to levitate hot air to the rooftop. With this genius design, no air-conditioning machine is needed.

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The second floor boasts a large living space with two-storeys high ceilings and glass walls.

The designer intended to use materials in their true forms. Thus, painting and coating were minimized. Naked concrete, bare brick walls, natural wood in neutral tones prevail. Where paints were needed, the designer choose Low VOC paint to lessen environmental damages.

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In a nutshell, this house is the one with environmental consciousness, crafting for co-living with nature inside out. Such energy saving home is considered a true earth-friendly building.

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The home’s double-swing gate is crafted from silver-painted steel rods. Welded wire patterns ensure good visibility and wind circulation.

link: http://www.archicentre.com.my/

Modern Tropical Home in Indonesia

Modern Tropical Home in Indonesia

Everything about this modern home presents a perfect example of tropical residential architecture. Check this out.

/// Indonesia ///

Story: Wuthikorn Suthiapa /// Photo: Soopakorn  Sriskul /// Designer: Andra Matin

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Andra Matin, the homeowner and designer of AM House, greeted us with a smile in his spacious multi-purposed room dominated by a solid-wooden long table. His tropical modern home was made of concrete, its unique stilt structures was outstanding. These elements intrigue us to hear what he had to say about the house.

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The living room on the second floor is visible from the street. Patches of greenery provide a camouflage for privacy

According to Matin, this state-of-the-art work took five years to finish. “I began building this house in 2008, starting out with cube-shaped design. As construction was underway, more details were added. By slowly and gradually building the house, I had time to consider best option for our family.”

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The pathway glides past a pond to the second floor. The entire ramp is paved with strips of timber set at half-inch intervals.
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A wood deck extends from the multi-purpose space.

Matin is widely known for his attention to details. Ranking among the top-rated architects who is responsible for pioneering modern tropical design projects across Indonesia. When it comes to designing a house to suit hot and humid climate, he relied mostly on nature and a clever floor plan. There are only two air-conditioning machines in the house. One is located in the basement bathroom, to control the humidity. And the other is on the top-floor bedroom.

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The multi-purpose room on the second floor is easily adaptable. The design is in accordance with tropical climates.
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The cooking station is built into the tabletop. An oven and a nearby refrigerator are disguised by Ulin, Indonesia native timber.
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The staircase is protected by a screen of vertical strips that double as a handrail.

“I have always been interested in spatial relationships rather that the form per se.” Matin mention his interest which he adopted to his works and the designing of his home.

“Good design is the one that takes ‘Spatial Relationships.’ into account. It looks into all kinds of activity that will take place within, and not just the room hemmed in by four walls. In reality, there exists an in-between space that subtly tells one room apart from the next, be it sitting or sleeping, walking or standing. After that, we look for the form or configuration that best fits in with those spaces, the climate, and ways of living.”

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The spiral staircase leads to a spacious bathroom with a walk-in closet. A shower area and a bathtub lie under a skylight.
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A small lodge in the backyard is Matin’s favorite hideout spot.
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The third-floor living space is adequately lit by natural light via the skylight right. On one side, floor-to-ceiling windows allow soft, diffused light in. During the day, there’s no need for an artificial light.

Matin sourced materials locally. This is not only to support the locals, Matin believe local artisans knows their stuff. “Local builders have insight know-hows and skills. These materials weren’t hard to find and savvy,” said Matin 

Apart from architecture, Matin also has a strong passion for travel. Hence, this house is full of fun gimmicks to make walking from room to room like an exciting adventure. The entrance is through the hill. Followed by a lounge area with a spiral staircase as a shortcut to a rooftop on one side and a tilted floor leading to a small lodge. A children room is also accessible through the lodge. A working space on the ground floor also has a backdoor hidden behind a bookshelf. The endless wonder in this modern tropical home is indeed no less than Peter Pan’s Neverland.

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The sloping lawn that covers the rooftop gradually descends and ends up on top of the bedroom window.

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The horizontal opening in the wall allows just enough natural light inside. The design is to avoid strong tropical sunlight.

 

link: http://www.andramatin.com/

 

Raw Concrete House in Paddy Fields

Raw Concrete House in Paddy Fields

On the highlands overlooking lush paddy fields stands a two-story raw concrete house in the midst of an idyllic natural setting.

/// Thailand /// 

Story: Wuthikorn Suthiapa /// Photo: Sitthisak Namkham /// Designer: Seksan Silpwatananukul

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The ground floor resembles that of a traditional Thai-style home. A covered loggia at the far end is set aside for entertaining guests, dining, or use as the outdoor workspace.
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Treated as the heart of this home, the Indian Oak adds a crisp cool feature to the outdoor living spaces. 

Here in the Mae Ann neighborhood of Chiang Mai’s Mae Rim District, life is simple. Dewdrops lingers on paddy fields, the scenic view seems to stretch farther than the eye could see. The house stands among teak trees.

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Naked-concrete steps descend to the courtyard with water ponds and a loggia at the far end.
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The owner takes very good care of the Indian Oak tree in the courtyard.  

At first, the land was left unattended. But Seksan Silpwatananukul, the designer manage to change the whole look to a raw concrete house. According to Seksan, every detail is well-considered.

“I took my time to look around in no hurry. After a talk with the owner, multiple levels seemed to suit the landscape best. We didn’t really stick to any particular style. But I would say Tropical modern is the best definition for it.”

 

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Warm morning sun kisses the front yard overlooking serene paddy fields.

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The center court terrace is breezy throughout the  day, courtesy openings in the exterior wall.
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The modern interior seating space features a high, sloped ceiling covered in reddish-brown wooden panel.

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link: http://www.baanlaesuan.com/25694/baanlaesuan/chiangmai-2/

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