Blog : box-shaped house

Beautiful White Box-shaped House offers the good life

Beautiful White Box-shaped House offers the good life

It’s every house owner’s dream to live in a beautiful home, but it takes a special kind of concentration for an architect to create a house that’s both beautiful and great to live in. This box-shaped white house belonging to Mo and Thinan Nakaprasit fits the bill perfectly.

/// THAILAND ///
Story: Samutcha Viraporn /// Photographs: Sitthisak Namkham

Construction was delayed for 2 years for Assistant Professor Dr.Tonkao Panin and Tanakarn Mokkhasmita of Research Studio Panin to properly develop a plan to build the house around a tree.

White Box-shaped HouseWhite Box-shaped House

“Our old house had a high tai thun (lower open space) and a tree in the middle of the house,” explained Mo. “We loved that place, and it was something like this, but we wanted to change a few things. To have a carport in the tai thun, the house had to be raised a bit, and our first house plan had a half-courtyard, with the tree only partially surrounded.”

White Box-shaped House

Mo and Thinan had already seen results of Dr. Tonkao’s design work, which stresses using simple geometric shapes to bring out hidden character and warmth. Reading Dr. Tonkao’s work gave Mo further insights into his concept of utilizing proportions, a code to unlock the geometric secrets in his classic designs. Of course, security presented another architectural challenge.

White Box-shaped House

 

Having lived in a house with glass walls, more privacy and security were important to Mo and Thinan: they wanted more containment. Creating secure viewpoints for looking both out of and into the house posed a challenge for the architect. Solutions began with placement of a large tree as the central focus of the house. Every room looks in towards the tree and also has views monitoring entry and exit of visitors in front. People inside can hardly be seen from outside, and the addition of steel panels adds more security.

The steel security panels were originally designed to be of exmet (expanded metal), but Mo consulted with the architects and decided instead on perforated steel, adding a charming polka dot pattern to the latticework blocking off the long walkway behind the house by the canal.

White Box-shaped House

“Environmentally, this is a great location: water and mountains are behind us, so we need practically no gardening of our own,” explains Mo. Instead of being near the road, the house is set deep in the back of the .4-acre property. Besides the tree between buildings, the living room has a beautiful view of the natural forest on the other bank of the canal. For easy maintenance, he property is landscaped primarily with grass lawn or paved with stones and large rocks, which are used especially for the shady, peaceful tai thun space, which gets no sunlight.

White Box-shaped House White Box-shaped House White Box-shaped House

For movable furniture, Mo especially wanted to bring some Modernform “black Iceland” items from their old house, which required some expansion of the kitchen. Other furniture is mostly from IKEA, with light color tones and light, simple shapes.

White Box-shaped House White Box-shaped House White Box-shaped House White Box-shaped House

“The longer we’ve lived here, the more charm we’ve found in this house, its great functionality, and the open areas, the deck and the tai thun. This is a very special design. Completely separate from other benefits, just the view as we drive in lets us see past the buildings to the mountains, water, a panorama of nature. I love it.”

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In Nature’s Peaceful Embrace
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Minimal-style Boxlike House

Minimal-style Boxlike House

Box-shaped, minimalist, skillfully utilitarian, the interior is open and spacious:  everywhere is visible from everywhere else.

/// Thailand ///
Story: Patsiri Chotpongsun /// Photography: Tanakitt Khum-on /// Design: Mr.Somphon Sangkerd

This very cool-looking cubic house design really stands out in this more than thirty-year-old subdivision. Quiet, simple lines, authentic surfaces. Minimal decoration, just the few furniture pieces necessary.

“Since Mom is in the house more than anyone else, things are designed mainly for her walking around, in and out of the kitchen, dining room, and bedroom – which is on the ground floor for her convenience. Maintenance is easy: no cracks and crevices, simpler for an older person to work with,” Suphot Saengkeut, her youngest son, tells us.

To make the concept a reality, the Saengkeut family demolished and completely did away with the old house to build something entirely new on the 300-square-meter property. They made the kitchen spacious and, Thai-style, open to natural light and air flow, with primarily tile surfaces. In the front are storage cabinets with easy-to-clean surfaces of frosted glass, and vertically set boxes for electrical and water systems, accessible from the outside for maintenance and repair.

“Here, form follows function: whatever use the space lends itself to, that’s how it’s used,” says Somphon, the middle son. The architect adds, “Starting from the car park area out front and lining up the ground floor rooms with the upstairs bedrooms, the necessary simplicity of the form became obvious, with no functional need to change. The rectangular shape opens out towards the entrance, for people to better enjoy the natural world outside.”

The house faces east, with a latticework metal fence and a carport, keeping the sun from reaching into the indoor living space. The kitchen is separated off by an opaque wall. The dining room opens out with a glass wall set in a metal lattice frame, and outside is a fence of synthetic wood that blocks the sun and adds privacy. To the north is an open courtyard in the center of the house with tree jasmine, a place to relax or exercise, and a spiral stair which leads up to the bedroom of Somphop, the oldest son, without going back into the house.

Somphon installed solar slab panels with a gap between them and the concrete roof for good ventilation, also helped by air channels with metal caps  releasing hot air from within. The panels shade the roof, which also has foam heat insulation beneath it.

Suphot leaves us with some final thoughts: “The house is really well set up for individual privacy. The living room is used the least, but a lot of mornings, evenings, and holidays we hang out together in the dining room. And if I’m upstairs working, there’s an open wall, and I can keep an eye on Mom downstairs. It’s a good feeling to know she’s safe, and we’re right there for her.”

 

 

 

White Box House Where They Love to Cook

White Box House Where They Love to Cook

This place is really cool. From the outside, it looks like 3 boxes, one atop the other. Inside it has everything this lovebird pair of chefs could want.

/// Thailand ///
Story: Wuthikorn Suthiapa /// Photography: Soopakorn Srisakul, Nantiya Bussabong and Spaceshift Studio /// Design: Sook Architects Co.,Ltd.

Photo: Spaceshift Studio
Photo: Spaceshift Studio

On first stepping into the house you don’t see the expected living room, complete with sofa and TV console, but rather a dining table long enough to sit 8-10 people. Owners Oh (Nanthaphon Lilainukul) and Art (Thirayuth Khongdee) have a Facebook page called “The Dish Whisperer” for cooking aficionados. They told us that when their daughter was born continued life in their condo didn’t lend itself to cooking, so they looked around for a new residence.

“I’ve lived around here since I was three. My mother lives just three doors down, which is why we came back to this area. Outside the village there’s that confused urban hustle and bustle, but here it’s quiet and peaceful.”

Art notes that the 3-storey design uses vertical space to advantage on this compact lot. To guard against flooding, the house is one meter higher than the foundation. In the cellar such things are stored as jars of organic vegetables preserved by Oh herself. The first floor is made up of a studio featuring that long table which – besides dining – is used for receiving guests and holding cooking workshops: Oh is a certified chef with a specialty in French pastries, while Art is a master of Thai food. Between kitchen and the studio is a stairway to the second floor and a storage room for Oh’s ceramic dishware.

“Actually I graduated in engineering, but cooking was always my thing. Each time I went to Japan I got more hooked on its food culture, and eventually decided to go my own way and do what I loved, which is cooking and collecting beautiful dishware. I’ve found some really beautiful ceramic stuff in second-hand stores, but some I buy from abroad.”

The second floor has a multi-purpose family room, and cool air blows through all the time, making it comfortable for relaxation and sleeping. The roughly finished wood of door and window frames gives a charming rural look, warm and intimate. Windows swing out to reach towards Oh’s mother’s house, making us imagine a cottage, giving a gentle look to what might be a minimalist façade.

Behind the multi-purpose area is a bedroom. Their daughter still sleeps with her parents, but they’re ready for the future: on the third floor is their daughter’s neat and orderly future bedroom and balcony.

This house is more than a family residence: Oh’s cooking workshops are held here, too. Her focus here is less on preparation of dishes than on understanding raw ingredients and their use. Her food creations are straightforward and easy to follow, and inspire visitors to try them at home.

 

Photo: Spaceshift Studio

Link : https://www.facebook.com/SOOK-Architects-182111258504167/

http://spaceshiftstudio.com/

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