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SCOPE Promsri Condominium; Feeling Good Living Better World Class Real Estate in the Heart of Sukhumvit

SCOPE Promsri Condominium; Feeling Good Living Better World Class Real Estate in the Heart of Sukhumvit

BANGKOK / Designed to improve the quality of life, SCOPE Promsri sits on a prime residential lot in the heart of Sukhumvit, one of Bangkok’s vibrant cosmopolitan areas. Among its most outstanding features is the integration of the high-end contemporary furniture brand Ligne Roset of France with the overall design of every room and common area. A nexus between well thought-out design, best appliances brands and urban lifestyle conveniences, the 1.35-billion-Baht eight-story condo comes complete with a security system that exceeds standards for residential property management.

SCOPE Promsri

SCOPE Promsri is conveniently situated on Soi Promsri, a prime street that connects with three famous city thoroughfares; namely Soi Prompong (Sukhumvit 39), Soi Klang (Sukhumvit 49), and Soi Thonglor (Sukhunvit 55). The intention is to become a premium residential project capable of providing its residents with a world class service.

SCOPE Promsri

What makes SCOPE Promsri exceptionally good is the overall interior design paired with matching contemporary furniture by Ligne Roset, a high end brand that has been around for more than 160 years. Founded in 1860, Ligne Roset grew from humble beginnings and transformed itself into a successful furnishings outfit with branches across the globe. Over time, modern luxury furniture and decorative accessories have earned the company a reputation as experts in design and innovative manufacturing processes. The secret to its success lies in strict quality control that culminates in unique products that are not only handsome and comfortable, but also a profusion of elegance and value characteristic of French design.

SCOPE Promsri

Yongyuth Chaipromprasith is creative expert in real estate development and CEO of the SCOPE Co, Ltd, which specializes in homes at the international premium level. He said: “We commit ourselves to providing quality and innovative design that has been our signature from day one. Every project that we’ve accomplished are the product of collaborations between us and other experts in the field, including world famous brands. When it comes to home furnishings, it’s not about selecting products from catalogs. Rather, it’s an act of working with others who have comprehensive knowledge and skill in a bid to create products that are evidence of quality and best express our ideas.”

SCOPE Promsri

By this is meant that SCOPE Promsri places great emphasis on the individual’s privacy and freedom from being disturbed by others. Hence, there are only two business units, compared to 146 residential condominium units on the premises. First and foremost, it’s designed to raise the quality of life and improve safety for the project’s residents. This is evident in the installation of water sprinklers in the ceiling of every room, despite it not being required by law governing eight-story buildings.

That’s not all. At SCOPE Promsri every condominium comes complete with modern conveniences and household appliances that comply with standards. They include electrical kitchen appliances by the MIELE brand of Germany, plus built-in combinations consisting of a microwave oven, induction cook top, kitchen exhaust fan, and built-in Liebherr brand refrigerator, as well as wall-mounted washlets by Kohler, Germany.

SCOPE Promsri

Apart from the full complement of world class equipment, every condo unit receives a great deal on decoration known as “Promsri Edition Fully Furnished Package”, an 890,000-Baht value that includes, among other things, a Prado sofa by Christian Werner. Customers are allowed to choose more than one color for the sofa. Plus, there’s a special edition table code named “Promsri Table”, which is manufactured exclusively by Ligne Roset for this project only. And that’s not all. The list also includes a built-in console that comes with a 75-inch TV set, bed with headboard decorating ideas and mattress by Simmons, the world class brand that’s used by six star hotels across the globe.

SCOPE Promsri

Strictly speaking, the Promsri Edition is more than just a list of household equipment or furniture. Rather, it opens the door to a new lifestyle evolving around feeling good and living better ideas. It’s about nurturing quality thoughts that culminate in good design for homes at the international premium level.

Yongyuth added: “SCOPE Promsri has invested a lot of money to create a good first impression with the project’s exterior design. But the quality that pleases the aesthetic senses alone isn’t enough. That’s why we also place great emphasis on long term durability and ease of maintenance. This is evident in the use of reflective glass acoustic film that not only protects resident privacy, but also reduces heat transfer from outside, thereby saving on energy consumption. Plus, it doubles as sound barrier that reduces street noise by as much as 30%, a feature that’s further enhanced by motorized blackout blinds for added indoor thermal comfort. It’s designed to achieve total darkness in the room, especially for customers in the young international premium group who requires the highest quality of rest. This is particularly important for the so-called work-hard, high-income group.”

“SCOPE gives good living conditions the highest priority. For this reason, it provides a variety of services including safe transport of food items and cleaning service. It’s a luxury condo that not only allows pets, but also is truly pet friendly. By enforcing carefully thought-out rules and regulations, it ensures that pet owners and non-pet owners can live together in harmony.”

SCOPE PromsriSCOPE Promsri SCOPE Promsri

SCOPE Promsri condos complete with the “Promsri Edition Fully Furnished Package” are on sale now for 6.3 million Baht apiece. The scheduled finish date is around November 2022. Unit reservation has begun as of 12 March 2021. Register now at www.scopepromsri.com

SCOPE Promsri

The Elephant World of Surin; Architecture Dedicated to the Asian Pachyderm and the Kuy People

The Elephant World of Surin; Architecture Dedicated to the Asian Pachyderm and the Kuy People

SURIN / This small province about 6 hours’ drive from Bangkok is home to the Elephant World, an architectural landmark dedicated to preserving the warm, good-natured Asian pachyderm. The project extends across 3,000 Rai of land (roughly 1,200 acres) that’s part of the Dong Phu Din National Forest Reserve, one of Surin’s natural attractions.

The Elephant World of Surin

The province is often taken as synonymous with the richness of culture of the Kuy people and the thing they know best – tending the elephant. It’s the way of life that originated in the distant past, one that’s deep-rooted in their thought, behavior and tradition.

Modern day Kuy ethnic communities (also known as Suay) concentrate in the lower region of Thailand’s Northeast, mostly in Surin, while smaller populations can be found in southern Laos, and norther Cambodia.

Located at Baan Ta Klang, Tambon Krapho, Tha Toom District, the Elephant World began in 2001 in a bid to bring vagabond elephants back to their traditional home. It’s the responsibility of the Provincial Administrative Organization of Surin. The project site sits surrounded by ethnic Kuy communities whose way of life has been concerned with the welfare, training and husbandry of elephants since time immemorial. Here, the peaceful Asian pachyderm is treated like family.

The Elephant World of Surin The Elephant World of SurinThe Elephant World of Surin

The Elephant World’s main attraction, the Outdoor Museum, is designed by architect laureate Asst. Prof. Boonserm Premthada of the Bangkok Project Studio. Apart from historical perspective, it provides a particular way of viewing lifelong friendships between humans and elephants.

Continuous vertical structures that enclose and divide exhibition areas are made of more than 480,000 bricks kilned the old-fashioned way. Sculptures set up at intervals tell stories of the role of elephants in ancient times. Together, they merge into stunning walled city vernacular that was the zeitgeist of the past eras.

The Elephant World of Surin The Elephant World of Surin

Currently under construction is the Cultural Center and Elephant Show Court with tiers of seats for spectators and a central space for the presentation of dramatic events. The open structures are supported by concrete poles, while roof framing is crafted of steel with wood slat coverings to allow natural light and good ventilation.

The Elephant World of Surin

A key element that’s easily recognized from a distance is the Lookout Tower that rises as high as a five-story building. 360-degree views can be seen as if from above from here.

The Elephant World of Surin The Elephant World of SurinThe Elephant World of SurinThe Elephant World of SurinThe Elephant World of Surin

Besides the three landmarks mentioned above, the Elephant World also features other interesting attractions. They include the Building of Majestic Elephants, the Elephant Training School, Kuy villages, 3D movie theatre, as well as shops and restaurants. If cultural tourism is your thing, stop by the Elephant World next time you visit Surin. For information, call 0-4414-5050; 0-4451-1975; or visit http://elephantworldsurin.com.

Story and photographs: Nawapat Dusdul

 

Sneak Preview of the BaanLaeSuan Fair Select 2021; A Show on the Theme of “Open Culture”

Sneak Preview of the BaanLaeSuan Fair Select 2021; A Show on the Theme of “Open Culture”

Happening now… The BaanLaeSuan Fair Select 2021. It’s an opportunity not to be missed whether you’re a savvy shopper, pet lover, green thumb, design aficionado, or just looking for a hangout to keep in touch. The show on the theme of “Open Culture” is happening from 17 to 21 March at the Bangkok International Trade and Exhibition Center, or BITEC Bang-Na. Essentially, it’s about keeping an open mind, caring and sharing good designs vital for the betterment of society.

Register here to attend: https://amarinfair.com/go/1922

“Open Culture” is a design trend that’s aimed primarily at achieving a better quality of life. It’s concerned with things we do every day, from creating a design that’s friendly to the environment, to implementing green and sustainable initiatives that can ignite innovation. It opens the door to new possibilities where designers and people in the community work together to arrive at a solution that can ultimately benefit the people and society at large. Here are some of the highlights from this year’s BaanLaeSuan Fair Select.

BaanLaeSuan Fair Select 2021

“Open Books”, BaanLaeSuan Printing and Publishing Zone

The BaanLaeSuan Printing and Publishing Zone features prominently as a large bookstore in the exhibition. Be spoilt for choice when it comes to an enormous richness of publications on homes and gardens, plus new releases issued for viewing and great photography locations. There are plenty of ideas and inspirations for do-it-yourself projects, from growing roses to building your own nursery, to creating multifunctional spaces at home and post-retirement agricultural activity.

BaanLaeSuan Fair Select 2021

Whilst there, stop to browse around the bookstore, or take a moment to enjoy a good read sipping coffee at a café ensconced among beautiful roses. That’s not all. BaanLaeSuan Classroom is also giving classes on popular subjects, including how to grow cactuses from seeds and preparing garden soil for growing roses. If roses are your thing, drop by one of these classes at Hall 101.

BaanLaeSuan Fair Select 2021

“Open Culture”, The Main Entryway

Here’s the main entrance to the show on the theme of “Open Culture”. Elsewhere, different exhibition zones are marked by different archways. Each of them is designed to be easily recognized and communicate the idea about what’s on display. If you’re looking for plants and decorative items for the garden, look for Hall 98 whose entrance is aptly adorned with healthy green foliage.

BaanLaeSuan Fair Select 2021

“Open Playground”, BaanLaeSuan Pets Zone

The BaanLaeSuan Pets Zone is a playground for pet lovers. It’s an area for your pet cats and dogs to play in. Whilst there, take a moment to attend workshops organized by BaanLaeSuan Classroom. They include lessons in hand embroidery by Leerapat Kasantikul, and practical exhibitions of how collars, leashes and toy balls for cats and dogs are made. It’s also a place to shop snacks and household articles, plus cat, dog and puppy toys. Carefully selected retailers in are on hand to please every pet person. Feeling tired? Sit down for beautiful relaxing music and give your canine or feline friends a treat. It’s happening at Hall 99.

BaanLaeSuan Fair Select 2021BaanLaeSuan Fair Select 2021BaanLaeSuan Fair Select 2021

“Open Garden”, the Garden of Ideas

The Garden of Ideas Zone at BaanLaeSuan Fair Select has typically focused on the defining spirit or mood of a particular period. This time around, we feel the whole world is concerned about the future the environment and there’s an intense longing for a return to nature. That said, the concept of “Natural Climate” comes in handy to convey ideas about natural growth. Because plants grow differently depending on the surroundings and trends at any given time, we think it appropriate to present four different types of landscaping in the exhibition. Meantime, BaanLaeSuan Classroom is also giving classes on picture painting with watercolors using materials from nature. Stop by for ideas for growing:

1. Desert Plants
2. Edible Gardens
3. Wetland Plants
4. Exotic Plants

BaanLaeSuan Fair Select 2021 BaanLaeSuan Fair Select 2021BaanLaeSuan Fair Select 2021

“Open Space”, room Magazine Showcase

Discover, connect, and keep yourself updated of developments in design, space utilization, furniture, and home decorations the moment you come in through the main entryway at Hall 101. Here, the concept of “Open Space” is featured prominently to call your attention to how spaces can be made to serve a variety of functions, from a rest area to common area and workspace that makes a good first impression. The semi-outdoor design gives a sense of openness and connectivity reminiscent of a home and corridor restaurant that’s comfortable, exotic and warm.

The room Magazine Showcase is the coming together of a bookstore, café, and music, plus an exhibition on the concept of Betterism, which essentially is about good design for better society. Here, custom products by groups of individuals as well as private and government sectors are on display. They include bamboo furniture that’s the product of a collaboration between BaanLaeSuan and Mae Jaem Model Plus, a social enterprise. In essence, it’s about increasing production at community levels.

BaanLaeSuan Fair Select 2021

Chang Green Oasis

Tired from too much walking? Why not sit down and relax at Chang Green Oasis? Decorated with gorgeous greenery, it’s a rest area designed to accommodate exhibition goers. You will love live music. Plus, there are plenty of refreshing drinks to satisfy every thirst, including Asian Blend coffee. Give it a try.

Story:  Sarayut Sreetip-ard, Special Activity, BaanLaeSuan Magazine
Photo: Soopakorn Srisakul, Nuntiya

Suppapong Sonsang; A Furniture Designer Who Grows Forests to Fulfill His Timber Needs

Suppapong Sonsang; A Furniture Designer Who Grows Forests to Fulfill His Timber Needs

Some ten years ago, Suppapong Sonsang rose to fame as a laureate of the Designer of the Year award. Apparently content with living a green lifestyle, he kind of vanished from the limelight and got into a different field, something more upstream.

He brought 70 rai of destroyed forest land back to life in a bid to generate enough timber supplies for Jird Design Gallery, his very own furniture brand. Committed to sustainable growth, he viewed the mammoth undertakings as crucial for the future of his career as designer.

Lesson 2 Understanding Wood / Learn from Suppapong Sonsang, a furniture designer of Jird Design Gallery.

In a recent meet-up with room Magazine, he said: “The design profession is dependent upon purchase orders and customer hiring contracts. To do a good job or run a business well, skill alone isn’t enough. You also need a readiness to accomplish the task, reliable resources, even luck, et cetera. So I set out to find a green route for business to continue to perform for a long time; meanwhile, relying less on hiring contracts and more on selling direct to end-users. I viewed the practice of growing and caring for timber forests as a basic occupation with some hope for the future.” 

Suppapong Sonsang

Suppapong started his first new growth forest at Kamphaeng Phet Province in lower northern Thailand and gradually expanded to Nong Pho, Ratchaburi. The latter has since served as his headquarters with storage facilities for partly prepared timber and logs. There’s a sawmill with 4-5 types of machinery, where logs are cut, sawn into lumber and packaged ready for delivery. As business grew, he converted his humble abode in the forest into a showroom.

As he put it, “Timber is a valuable resource. So I focus on planting only trees that have economic importance. Little by little, I searched for knowledge and experimented with various methods in a bid to achieve the desirable outcome. Eventually, I obtained not only the resources needed for furniture making, but also a workplace with the atmosphere of a nature reserve. Before anything else, it’s about the better quality of life.” 

Suppapong Sonsang

Suppapong’s forests are home to valuable ecosystems. Apart from hardwood trees that are grown for timber, he also set aside some areas for planting crops. His work on the farm encompasses three aspects of product manufacturing, including design, human resources, and forest resources management.

Sharing his work experience, Suppapong said: “I’m responsible for design while others are busy taking care of things, ranging from caring for the forest floor and planting new trees, to grafting branches and growing plants from seeds in nurseries. Everyone deserves a good quality of life. For people in the community who’re working with us, it’s an opportunity to learn new skills in carpentry and agriculture. The knowledge that they gain as apprentices will be an asset beneficial to their future career.

Suppapong Sonsang

“Meantime, the forests that we grow ensure that our furniture business will be adequately resourced for a long time to come, in other words until death do us part. It will be another 20 to 30 years down the road before some of the trees become fully grown and ready for harvesting. That said, it’s a guarantee that our community will still have timber supply lasting us a hundred years, or after old growth forests have been depleted.”

“While others invest in big manufacturing facilities and expensive machines, we put our money in land that we need to grow forests for timber. Oftentimes, people asked why we chose land covered with trees and undergrowth instead of beautiful pieces of property elsewhere. Well, it may be of little value to them. But it’s a great asset both for us and for the community 20 years down the road. We will have access to timber that our business needs. To begin with, it’s about growing healthy forest ecosystems. That means you need the initial capital, and patience. You have to give it all your energy to succeed. Been there, survived that. And now the rest is easy,” said Suppapong laughing.

Suppapong Sonsang

“From then until now, little went as planned. Success came from resilience and the ability to adapt to new challenges. The workers that we hired from the community had no carpentry skill. So we started training them while the trees still had a long way to grow and mature. We believe that by the time our forests are ready for harvesting, our helping hands will have become well versed in woodworking. In the meantime, we just have to keep up with design trends. Together, they constitute parallel paths to future growth.”  

Suppapong Sonsang

Above, a bench seat from the KOOPREE collection by Suppapong Sonsang is made of timber from KrathinThepa (scientific name: Acacia mangium) a species of fast growing tree in the pea family Fabaceae. Harvested at 7 years of age, the tree provides an alternative to hardwood commonly used in furniture making.

Suppapong Sonsang of Jird Design Gallery is one of subject matter experts being featured in an online curriculum titled, “A Passion for Woodworking”. It’s part of Baan Lae Suan Classroom, a collaboration with the Creative Economy Agency (Public Organization), or CEA. The program is designed for people interested in woodworking and those looking to acquire basic carpentry skills through furniture making using basic tools and community resources. Plus, it provides tips for developing a career in creative business. The program is hosted by Jeremiah Pitakwong, Editor of Baan Lae Suan Magazine.

Suppapong Sonsang

In the previous video, we presented a lesson on the Milking Stool by distinguished designer/carpenter Phisanu Numsiriyothin. In this episode, Suppapong Sonsang shows the steps in transforming homegrown timber into a beautiful bench seat. 

Source: 
https://www.baanlaesuan.com/online-program/classroom/215124.html
https://www.baanlaesuan.com/181474/design/design-update/people/jird

Singapore’s Largest Forest Town in the Making

Singapore’s Largest Forest Town in the Making

SINGAPORE / An eco-smart city promising 42,000 new homes is poised to become the largest evergreen forest town in Singapore with the move-in date set for 2023.

Tengah the Forest Town

Designed to reduce CO2 gases that trap heat and drive extreme weather, the eco-friendly city plan features cutting-edge technologies, including water and electricity conservation features, plus an automated, enclosed waste collection system.

Revolving around the slogan “At home with nature”, the development project comprises five residential districts with plenty of gardens laid out for public enjoyment and recreation across 7 square kilometers of land. Plus, it’s a relatively short distance from water catchment areas and nature reserves.

The eco-city of Tengah, dubbed Singapore’s Forest Town, is located on what was formerly military training grounds and home to brick factories in the island’s western region.

Tengah the Forest Town

For many people, the massive project evokes fun memories of city-building video games, but this is a real-life future city master plan ever undertaken by the Singapore Housing and Development Board to create new homes, workplace and public spaces set amid safe and sustainable surroundings.

To reduce greenhouse gases, solar power and other forms of clean energy will be integrated with the comprehensive plan to keep the city cool and reduce the need for air conditioning.

Other low-impact measures in preparation include making the city center a car-free zone and the promotion of green commuting by providing safe bicycle track systems and easy access to public transportation, namely the MRT Jurong Regional Line and bus services.

Scheduled for opening in 2023, the Forest Town of Tengah will become the 24th residential project undertaken by HDB since World War II.

Tengah the Forest Town

Sources:

Singapore Housing & Development Board (HDB): https://www.hdb.gov.sg/cs/infoweb/about-us/history/hdb-towns-your-home/tengah

CNN: https://edition.cnn.com/style/article/singapore-tengah-eco-town/index.html#:~:text=Promising%2042%2C000%20new%20homes%20across,government%20since%20World%20War%20II.

Waste-Ed: https://www.facebook.com/GoWasteEd/photos/a.2678571425548059/5178235835581593/?type=3

Image: Housing & Development Board (HDB) 

Phisanu Numsiriyothin Master Woodworker Who Cares about Forests

Phisanu Numsiriyothin Master Woodworker Who Cares about Forests

A designer who’s passionate about all things made of wood, Phisanu Numsiriyothin has grown familiar with using woodworking tools at home since a very young age.

Let’s begin with building a cow milking stool. Learn from Phisanu Numsiriyothin, master woodworker and professional carpenter. / Lesson 1 Getting Started in Woodworking

Upon graduation with a degree in Visual Arts, he led a self-indulgent life for a time pushing himself beyond the limits only to find it had taken a toll on his body and mind. He soon learned that life didn’t get much better than spending the day in a woodworking studio. Life took a turn for the better after his exposure to works of outstanding artistry by big names such as George Nakashima, Sam Maloof, James Krenov, and master craftsman Saiyart Sema-ngern. Only then did his career in woodworking begin in earnest.

Phisanu Numsiriyothin / BaanLaeSuan Classroom / A Passion for Woodworking / Getting Started in Woodworking / master woodworker / professional carpenter

In a recent interview with room magazine, Phisanu said his belief in the value of woodworking came from experience that spanned more than a decade. “A designer may have considerable knowledge of chair making. But if he’s unfamiliar with splintering or tear-out, has never done wood planing or used joinery tools, then he’s only thinking of two parts of the entire process — design proportions, and graphic visuals or style. In the end, beautiful design is achieved, but it may not be the best choice for wood. Plus, ill-conceived design could result in a lot of waste that compounds the world’s garbage problem.”  

The world that he alludes briefly to is one in which a woodworker exists in harmony with natural woodlands. It’s a world where people harvest trees for timber responsibly and at the same time allow time for forests to thrive. Such an ideology can translate into a physically concrete form as is the case with “Rush Chair” by Phisanu in collaboration with the design duo, Jutamas Buranajade and Piti Amraranga, of o-d-a. They use small pieces trimmed off large trees to build the chair frame using traditional methods of wood joinery, while the seat is made of woven natural fibers dyed different shades of indigo.

Phisanu Numsiriyothin / BaanLaeSuan Classroom / A Passion for Woodworking / Getting Started in Woodworking / master woodworker / professional carpenter

If sustainable design refers to a piece of furniture that’s comfortable to sit on, easy to fix using parts sourced directly from nature, and capable of reducing negative impacts on the environment, then Rush Chair would fit that definition, a chair that’s eco-friendly in every sense of the word.

As Phisanu puts it, “If we design without focusing on just our needs and start paying attention to the environment,  the result will be very different. As for me, I focus not only on the production technique, but also on the wood being used, the tools needed to perform the task, and everything that combines to add value to woodwork.”

Rush Chair
Rush Chair

For the time being, Phisanu has relocated his fully equipped studio from Bangkok’s Buddha Puja area to Kuchinarai District in Kalasin. Here, he established a field workshop to make furniture from locally sourced materials. The villagers were available to work after the annual rice growing season had passed. So he persuaded them to join in making the Rush Chair based on design improved in conjunction with o-d-a. By making seat furniture from tree branches found in the area, Phisana subtly communicated the need to protect and preserve the environment among participating villagers. He has discovered the astounding connection between people and trees, and used it wisely promote nature conservation in the long term.

“I believe that between the chair and the trees, our home planet prefers more trees. They are crucial to the physical surroundings, far more important than my designing achievements. By realizing the importance of each and every tree, we are motivated to come up with good design and elaborate manufacturing process, and the resulting effect is worth a try.”

Phisanu Numsiriyothin / BaanLaeSuan Classroom / A Passion for Woodworking / Getting Started in Woodworking / master woodworker / professional carpenterPhisanu Numsiriyothin / BaanLaeSuan Classroom / A Passion for Woodworking / Getting Started in Woodworking / master woodworker / professional carpenter

Phisanu Numsiriyothin is one of subject matter experts being featured in an online curriculum titled, “A Passion for Woodworking”. It’s part of BaanLaeSuan Classroom, a collaboration with the Creative Economy Agency (Public Organization), or CEA. The program is designed for people interested in woodworking and those wanting to acquire basic carpentry skills through furniture making, plus ideas about using local materials and tips for developing a career in creative business. It’s hosted by Jeremiah Pitakwong, Editor of BaanLaeSuan Magazine.

Phisanu said: “A stool for milking dairy cows. It’s a basic stool, very basic and easy to build. It’s lightweight and portable. A first for anyone wanting to try his hand at woodworking. Plus it’s come a long way in terms of design history. It depends on the material we can find, or the purpose of use. This one isn’t made of wood sticks. I made it instead from a solid tree trunk. And this one from wood slabs. The method differs occasionally. Sometimes we use leftovers or cut wide planks to make legs. We’re talking about using one type of material.” 

Phisanu Numsiriyothin / BaanLaeSuan Classroom / A Passion for Woodworking / Getting Started in Woodworking / master woodworker / professional carpenter
Milking stool

 Let’s begin with building a cow milking stool. Learn from Phisanu Numsiriyothin, master woodworker and professional carpenter. Click this link to get started https://dai.ly/x7zc9y1

Modern Skinny House on a Narrow Lot

Modern Skinny House on a Narrow Lot

The homegrown architecture firm SAWADEESIGN applied innovative aircraft cabin ideas to give this narrow townhouse a complete makeover. The small family home sits sandwiched between two low-rise buildings in the heart of Tan Binh District. They named the project “303 House.”

Modern House / Modern Skinny House on a Narrow Lot in Ho Chi Minh City

Townhouse is a typical housing type omnipresent throughout urban Ho Chi Minh City, formerly Saigon. By law, places of residence with a frontage smaller than 3.0 meters are not permitted to have more than one floor.

So the only way to build is arrange all the usable spaces and functions on the same horizontal plane. The result is a renovation done right in every sense of the word.

Modern House / Modern Skinny House on a Narrow Lot in Ho Chi Minh City

From the outside looking in, the entire width of the house is only 2.9 meters. With the exterior walls installed, the inside space comes to just 2.7 meters wide.

Interestingly enough, well thought-out design turns an awkward narrow plot into a single-story home that’s simple with all useable spaces giving off good vibes. The bright and airy home occupies less than 90 square meters of land.

Modern House / Modern Skinny House on a Narrow Lot in Ho Chi Minh City

The design duo, Doan Si Nguyen and Vo Thanh Phat, decided against the most commonly used construction process. They proposed an alternative method aimed at reducing the amount of concrete used, an option that risked being rejected by investors from the get-go.

The house ceiling is made of rockwool tole about 150 mm thick. The coated tinplate is widely used in the storage industry and large warehouses for its excellent thermal insulation. Here, it’s used to make the interior living spaces comfortable day and night.

Modern House / Modern Skinny House on a Narrow Lot in Ho Chi Minh City

The contemporary home interior features mixed materials. Among them, grey plaster on the wall proves a perfect complement to gray epoxy paint on the floor.

Together, they provide desirable elements for a calm, peaceful home. Everywhere, furniture made of plywood is a great way to bring a natural look to the interior.

Modern House / Modern Skinny House on a Narrow Lot in Ho Chi Minh City

According to the architects, the secret to creating a healthy home lies in putting multiple layers of functional spaces in neat order to shield the interior from the busy street.

This is especially true in HCMC, where many homes are prone to suffer from the negative effects of outside noise and unrestricted growth of housing areas and commercial development.

Fascinatingly, aircraft cabin ideas came in handy for the townhouse built on an extremely long and narrow plot of land. It’s reminiscent to walking along an aisle between rows of seats on an aircraft. 

Modern House / Modern Skinny House on a Narrow Lot in Ho Chi Minh CityModern House / Modern Skinny House on a Narrow Lot in Ho Chi Minh City Modern House / Modern Skinny House on a Narrow Lot in Ho Chi Minh City

There’s a paved outdoor area in front of the house entrance that provides a place to socialize. Step inside, and you come into a corridor connecting to a living area, kitchen, and laundry room. Wall-mounted storage cabinets line one side of the aisle and beautifully organized functional spaces on the other.

Two bedrooms with a bathroom attached are tucked away further inside, plus a third at the rear of the house accessible by a small corridor with relaxing area. Where appropriate, clear roofing panels provide natural light for indoor plants, while openings in the wall keep the interior airy and comfortable without air conditioning.

Modern House / Modern Skinny House on a Narrow Lot in Ho Chi Minh CityModern House / Modern Skinny House on a Narrow Lot in Ho Chi Minh City Modern House / Modern Skinny House on a Narrow Lot in Ho Chi Minh CityModern House / Modern Skinny House on a Narrow Lot in Ho Chi Minh City

Not only is the house plan tailored to the specific needs of a family of three. It’s also a great way to live a green life in the midst of the city. Here, in many instances homeowners rent the space in front of their houses to small retailers and businesses. But the residents at 303 House don’t need that kind of income.

They prefer to keep the door closed and enjoy privacy in the comfort of their home. All things considered, it’s mission accomplished.

Modern House / Modern Skinny House on a Narrow Lot in Ho Chi Minh CityModern House / Modern Skinny House on a Narrow Lot in Ho Chi Minh City Modern House / Modern Skinny House on a Narrow Lot in Ho Chi Minh City

Design: SAWADEESIGN / https://www.sawadeesign.net
Lead Architects: Doan Si Nguyen and Vo Thanh Phat
Story: The Architects x Nawapat Dusdul
Photography: Quang Tran / http://quangdam.com

New Forest Park the Pride of Bangkok

New Forest Park the Pride of Bangkok

BANGKOK / As many probably already know, Fort Canning Park is one of Singapore’s largest public parks. It features nine historic gardens that are part of the “garden city” vision introduced in the mid-1990’s. Do you know that in the near future, upon completion of Phases 2 and 3 of the Benjakitti Park expansion project, Bangkok will join the ranks of ASEAN capitals with vast networks of parks to preserve local ecosystems. It represents an important step forward to increase the quality of life for many residents as well as visitors.

Bajakitti Forest Park
A graphic rendition of Benjakitti Forest Park, a future urban e cosystem in the heart of Bangkok.

Opened in 1994, Benjakitti Park underwent the first phase of renovations in 2016 on an area of 61 rai. Phases 2 and 3, which include an expansion and landscape improvements, are currently progressing on schedule. The new, updated Benjakitti Park extends over an area of 259 rai that originally was home to a tobacco manufacturing facility. Costing 652 million baht to build, the monumental forest park project is a joint enterprise involving the Finance Ministry Treasury Department, the Royal Thai Army, and the Arsom Silp Institute of the Arts, which is responsible for design.

Bajakitti Forest Park Bajakitti Forest Park Bajakitti Forest Park

The urban forest project will provide a new ecosystem that supports the quality of life in the city. It’s designed to give rise to a biological community that depends on an intricate network of water channels, which in turn is crucial to the growth of trees and shrubbery and habitats for many animal species.

Like a super absorbent sponge, the park’s unpaved grounds are capable of soaking up in excess of 128,000 cubic meters of storm water during the rainy season. Plus, it doubles as a treatment plant that produces as much as 1,600 cubic meters of treated water per day. The existing trees, 1,733 in all, have been preserved. To create a pristine forest landscape, they plan on adding a variety of native tree species, among them Lumpae (Sonneratia caseolaris), Lumpoon (Sonneratia ovate), Kheelek (Senna siamea), Sadao (Neem), Bodhi or sacred figs (Ficus religiosa), Banyan trees, Yangna (Dipterocarpus alatus), and Takhian (Hopea odorata). 

Bajakitti Forest Park
A graphic rendition of Benjakitti Forest Park, a future urban e cosystem in the heart of Bangkok.

Bajakitti Forest Park Bajakitti Forest Park

That’s not all. Currently plans are afoot to connect Benjakitti Forest Park with a trade show pavilion and three nearby museums; namely the old tobacco factory building, an urban forest life museum, and a museum in honor of Her Majesty Queen Sirikit the Queen Mother. There will also be demonstration rice paddy fields for kids, plus bike trails and a skywalk system connecting to Lumpini Park, a landmark public green space in Pathumwan District.

Bajakitti Forest Park Bajakitti Forest Park Bajakitti Forest Park

The forest park project will bring benefits to not only the city and its people, but also healthy habitats for many animals. It provides temporary refuge to migratory bird species, a place for physical activity, and room for our children to spend more time outdoors. Most importantly, it removes pollutants and gives us clean air to breathe.

Bajakitti Forest Park Bajakitti Forest Park Bajakitti Forest Park

Benjakitti Forest Park will be open to the public in phases, the first of which is scheduled for the 12th of August this year. Access to the entire project will open around February 2022.

Source: Facebook / Army PR Center
https://www.facebook.com/armyprcenter/videos/1302628316766472/
https://www.greennetworkthailand.com/สวนป่า-เบญจกิติ/

Images:  Facebook / Army PR Center

Plant Me on the Moon

Plant Me on the Moon

The coffee shop name got its inspiration from “Fly Me to the Moon”, one of Frank Sinatra’s all-time greatest hits. A brainchild of the Bangkok-based studio Embassy of Design Territory, the serene café serving coffee and refreshments is nestled among lush tropical gardens in the heart of the city’s Lad Phrao District.

Plant Me on the Moon , cafe in Bangkok Plant Me on the Moon , cafe in Bangkok

Drawing on his experience and a remarkable aptitude for organizing events, the designer transformed an ordinary co-creating office space into a coffee shop ensconced among the trees and shrubs. The café on the ground floor is characterized by a relaxing cozy atmosphere that gives off good vibes. Vertical gardens come in handy to fulfill a dream that one day humans will be able to grow them on the Moon.

Plant Me on the Moon , cafe in Bangkok Plant Me on the Moon , cafe in BangkokPlant Me on the Moon , cafe in Bangkok Plant Me on the Moon , cafe in Bangkok

Design ideas: The outside part of the shop is made of steel scaffolds with platforms or shelves, upon which gardens of luxuriant foliage thrive. The café interior built of plywood affords ample space, while exterior glass walls protect it from the elements, let natural light shine through and increase aesthetic appeal. Wood furniture, vintage décor and garden plants have positive effects on the atmosphere and good mental health. There’s a picture of Leon: The Professional, a 1994 action thriller film, starkly juxtaposed with lush green surroundings. If you’re shopping for plant containers, there are plenty of them to buy.

Plant Me on the Moon , cafe in Bangkok

Why we love it: Like an oasis tucked away in a city neighborhood, “Plant Me on the Moon” is a perfect rendezvous to share good times with friends and loved ones. The atmosphere is just right for life, and coffee smells like fresh ground heaven, plus a collection of soothing garden music. Drop in for a nice cup of coffee, sit back, relax and enjoy the calm and peaceful greenhouse view!

Plant Me on the Moon , cafe in Bangkok Plant Me on the Moon , cafe in Bangkok

Address: 17 LadPhrao 93 off Lad Phrao Road,
Khlong Chaokhunsing, Wang Thonglang, Bangkok 10310
Open Daily 8.30 am – 8.00 pm
https://www.facebook.com/plantmeonthemoon/

 

Story: BRL
Photographs: Anupong Chaisukkasem

 

Country Villa Breathes in the Energy of Nature

Country Villa Breathes in the Energy of Nature

EN / MM

An intimate country hideaway affords a view of sugarcane fields and the lush forests of Khaoyai National Park. It sits ensconced in the misty morning mountain landscape that “Pod” Thanachai Ujjin, lead singer/song writer of the Moderndog band, calls home. His favorite hangout is a platform on the outside of the house, where he likes to sit under moonlight at 2 in the morning. Precisely, nature is on his doorstep.

Characteristic of modern tropical architecture, the house is spacious, light and breezy. The homeowner likens it to the calm and peaceful Thai temple pavilion. The brainchild of Nattapak Phatanapromchai of Erix Design Concepts, the minimalist home is aptly named “Villa Sati”, literally “House of Consciousness”, to communicate the state of being awake and aware of one’s surroundings.

Pod Moderndog Thanachai Ujjin country hideaway Khaoyai National Park Country Villa

Touched by moonlight and the starry sky, it has a roofed platform along the outside of the house that’s perfect for walking meditation, which the artist and his Mom often do together as family. Sharing his little piece of paradise, Pod said: “After moving out here, I feel as if there were more hours in the day. I rise early to go jogging, read, listen to music, and write songs.”

Pod Moderndog Thanachai Ujjin country hideaway Khaoyai National Park Country Villa

Their country retreat is made for a simple and peaceful life. Here, the artist and his Mom have plenty of time for their favorite pastimes – art making. The house plan is well thought out. Gable roof design proves a perfect complement to the platforms along the outside, while gorgeous open floorplans increase natural light and bring the outdoors into the home.

Pod Moderndog Thanachai Ujjin country hideaway Khaoyai National Park Country VillaPod Moderndog Thanachai Ujjin country hideaway Khaoyai National Park Country Villa

Come in through the front door, and you find the stand-alone Butterfly Stool, a 1954 icon of Japanese industrial design by Sori Yanagi. The bedroom that looks out over the field is on the right. Straight ahead is the kitchenette that connects to a living area that doubles as multipurpose room. Nearby, a set of stairs with dark clapboard siding leads to the attic that the artist has turned into a bedroom. The farthest end of the house is open to let southeasterly winds enter, a great way to ventilate the entire home. From here, the rolling sugarcane fields and mountains beyond can be seen in full view.

Pod Moderndog Thanachai Ujjin country hideaway Khaoyai National Park Country Villa Pod Moderndog Thanachai Ujjin country hideaway Khaoyai National Park Country VillaPod Moderndog Thanachai Ujjin country hideaway Khaoyai National Park Country Villa

Floating furniture is an easy hack to establish zones in open spaces and create traffic flow in the room. Modular storage cabinets from USM have the most prominent position alongside wall-mounted abstract art by Tae Pavit and a few painted pictures by Pod’s Mom.

Pod Moderndog Thanachai Ujjin country hideaway Khaoyai National Park Country Villa Pod Moderndog Thanachai Ujjin country hideaway Khaoyai National Park Country VillaPod Moderndog Thanachai Ujjin country hideaway Khaoyai National Park Country Villa

Commenting on design details, architect Nattapak Phatanapromchai said the platforms along the outside of the house afford beautiful panoramic views of the lush mountain landscape. Large openings in the walls allow fresh air to enter, creating air flow and bringing down ambient temperature to the point there’s no need for air conditioning.

Pod Moderndog Thanachai Ujjin country hideaway Khaoyai National Park Country Villa Pod Moderndog Thanachai Ujjin country hideaway Khaoyai National Park Country VillaPod Moderndog Thanachai Ujjin country hideaway Khaoyai National Park Country Villa

Meantime, the gable roof with long overhangs protects the platforms along the outside from the elements. The architect did away with the fascia, wooden boards covering the ends of rafters, to highlight the framework supporting the roof as was the case with the Thai style of residential architecture. Roof shingles are reminiscent of ancient tiles made beautiful by special paint for a real custom effect, while cement board deck or sheathing is installed underneath to protect against leaks.  

Pod Moderndog Thanachai Ujjin country hideaway Khaoyai National Park Country Villa Pod Moderndog Thanachai Ujjin country hideaway Khaoyai National Park Country VillaPod Moderndog Thanachai Ujjin country hideaway Khaoyai National Park Country Villa

House framing for the most part consists of wood, while framed glass wall systems stand tall from the threshold to the tie beam supporting the roof. The secret to a neat and tidy house plan lies in the side posts of every doorway and glass wall frame aligning with gable-end studs both when the door is open and shut. The result is a beautiful country house with clean design in the midst of scenic surroundings.

Pod Moderndog Thanachai Ujjin country hideaway Khaoyai National Park Country VillaPod Moderndog Thanachai Ujjin country hideaway Khaoyai National Park Country Villa

The house superstructure is built of Ta-khian timber, scientific name: Hopea odorata, a species of large trees native to Southeast Asia. Elevated 1.80 meters above ground level, the floorboard rests on steel reinforced concrete framing that’s a load-bearing foundation. The stilt house design that’s ubiquitous in tropical climates provides ventilation under the floor, a brilliant way to keep the home cool all year round. By and large, it’s a perfect example of traditional Thai house design, one that’s easy to look at and comfortable to live in.

Pod Moderndog Thanachai Ujjin country hideaway Khaoyai National Park Country Villa

The homeowner wrapped it up nicely. “I like the relative smallness of the house and surrounding open spaces. They’ve had a significant impact on human minds. For me, it gives vitality and enthusiasm. It fills my life with laughter and inspires exciting new ideas. It just so happens. Once I have an idea that I think has real potential, the rest is easy. Lyrics for a number of songs were written right here in this humble abode. The wide open spaces of the countryside are hugely rewarding for me as an artist.”

Story: Samutcha Viraporn
Photographs: Soopakorn Srisakul

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