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Hippo Farm Bioclimatic Dormitory; A Place to Reconnect with Nature

Hippo Farm Bioclimatic Dormitory; A Place to Reconnect with Nature

DONG NAI PROVINCE, VIETNAM / The Ho Chi Minh City-based design firm T3 ARCHITECTS has built a bioclimatic dormitory that’s part of a green classroom program in Vietnam. It’s made of locally sourced building materials, thereby reducing negative impacts on the climate and natural environment.

Hippo Farm Bioclimatic Dormitory; A Place to Reconnect with NatureHippo Farm Bioclimatic Dormitory; A Place to Reconnect with Nature

Aptly called “The Hippo Farm”, the 218-sq-m building is designed for students and families looking to just be surrounded by bountiful nature, gain experience with permaculture, go horseback riding, and learn more about sustainable construction.
 
Basically, it’s about getting involved in activities that reconnect with the true essence of education. Plus, it furthers the progress of team spirit and the opportunity for friends and family to share happy moments amid natural surroundings.
 
By design, the Hippo Farm is bioclimatic, a performance-based approach that pays particular attention to the relationship between living organisms and the weather conditions prevailing in an area.
 
To create a comfortable microclimate, T3 ARCHITECTS, or T3, first determined how the location and orientation of the site would affect the building’s energy profile. In so doing, the design team conducted a careful investigation of wind direction both during the dry season (to get the maximum benefits of natural air flow), and the rainy season (to protect the façade from water infiltration).
 
 

Hippo Farm Bioclimatic Dormitory; A Place to Reconnect with NatureHippo Farm Bioclimatic Dormitory; A Place to Reconnect with Nature Hippo Farm Bioclimatic Dormitory; A Place to Reconnect with Nature

Next, they decided to elevate the building site above flood level by covering it with soil and debris from old horse stables that had fallen into disrepair and subsequently knocked down. This improvement in the landscape had beneficial effects on wildlife and provided the natural home for insects that are useful at the other end of the food chain.
 
Reusing existing materials is part of a frugal approach to do more with less. The new building has a simple steel structure tailor-made near the site. The walls are built of local bricks covered with lime plastering mixed with red sand occurring naturally in the area. Roof insulation is made of Vietnamese rice husk mixed with diatomaceous earth, which helps protect against insects.
 
Formed from hard materials including silica and lignin, rice husk is humidity resistant, which makes it a suitable building material for Tropical climate. Plus, it’s inexpensive and biodegradable. The doors and windows are crafted of solid wood indigenous to Vietnam combined with woven bamboo paneling. Both are easily obtained and able to build on a budget. They are water repellent and serve as engine that drives natural ventilation. 
 
 

Hippo Farm Bioclimatic Dormitory; A Place to Reconnect with Nature Hippo Farm Bioclimatic Dormitory; A Place to Reconnect with NatureHippo Farm Bioclimatic Dormitory; A Place to Reconnect with Nature

To save water, dry toilet systems are used. The toilet seat is made of OSB, a type of engineered wood, with a stainless steel toilet tank underneath and a lid designed for easy operation. Without using water in the toilet systems, waste matter can be added to soil to help build and improve the upper layer of earth in which plants grow. The sink or washbasin is controlled by a push button to teach kids about the importance of water conservation.
 
Handrails and pergolas are made of Melaleuca wood indigenous to southern Vietnam. It stands up extremely well to water. Solar powered water heaters are installed on the roof facing south where sunlight exposure is the highest. The surrounding landscape showcases the gorgeous range of native perennials that have evolved naturally in the region. They provide excellent shade for the building and require very low maintenance. All things considered, it’s a creative design that values frugality and simplicity emblematic of the Tropical countryside.

Hippo Farm Bioclimatic Dormitory; A Place to Reconnect with NatureHippo Farm Bioclimatic Dormitory; A Place to Reconnect with NatureHippo Farm Bioclimatic Dormitory; A Place to Reconnect with Nature

Design: T3 ARCHITECTS | http://www.t3architects.com
Lead Architects: Charles GALLAVARDIN, Tereza GALLAVARDIN and Rafael LIRA
Design Team: Ta Quang Hai (Architect) and Huy NGUYEN (Interior Designer)
Contractor: Harmonie
Story: T3 ARCHITECTS / Living ASEAN
Photo: Herve GOUBAND (ALISA Production) | http://alisa-production.com

Grandpa’s New House at the Water’s Edge

Grandpa’s New House at the Water’s Edge

RATCHABURI / Because memories are made here, Puchong Satirapipatkul of the design firm OTATO Architect built a house for his grandfather Kumnung Yindeesuk. The new home nestles in a coconut grove overlooking Nong Salid Canal that connects to Damnoen Saduak, the bustling little town famous for its Floating Market.

Single-Storey House

From the beginning, the orchard land was in a clutter of untidiness while the old house was more than 30 years old and impossible to repair. The only way forward was a complete teardown to make room for a new home. The old house provided vintage recycled building materials, which gave Puchong the means to avoid a large cost overrun. Ensconced in a grove of coconut trees, jackfruits, and tamarinds, the single-story house plan is well suited to a 100-sq-wah lot. Plus, it offers a warm, comfortable environment while minimizing costs. To keep within a 700,000-baht budget, the architect used locally sourced building materials and oversaw construction work himself.

Single-Storey House Single-Storey House

To enhance views of the garden, Puchong chose a U-shaped house plan that’s made up of four blocks. Where appropriate, tall well-positioned windows create a stylish look and spacious feel. The result was a pared down tropical home for cool minimalist living. To merge into the landscape, he picked low pitch gable roof systems that blend harmoniously with traditional architecture in the area. Open floor plans maximize space and provide excellent flow from room to room. The front entry and south-facing walls that receive the afternoon sun are built of opaque materials to soak up the day’s heat. For a more comfortable living environment, north-facing walls are open to take in fresh air and beautiful views of the canal.

Single-Storey House Single-Storey House

The south-facing block contains a pantry, work station, and clothes storage closet. For indoor thermal comfort, the north-facing block is protected by an array of vertical fins. Not far away, a viewing platform supported on girders extends from the house to the water’s edge. The vertical louvre fins double as a privacy screen for the bedroom and provide light and breeze control. Together, they make the sitting room, dining room, and small balconies comfortable during daylight hours.

Single-Storey HouseSingle-Storey House Single-Storey House

“Adjacent to the U-shaped house plan lies a raised passageway that leads out to a body of water. Functional spaces are carefully thought out. Private residential areas are on the right side, while semi-outdoor spaces for houseguests are on the left,” Puchong explained.

Single-Storey House Single-Storey HouseSingle-Storey House

“Among other things, main functional spaces include a living room, dining room, bathroom, and bedroom neatly fitted into a small space. All of them have undisturbed views of the canal. High ceilings paired with tall windows make the house feel bigger, light and airy. To get work done fast, only standard building materials were used. They included ceiling panels, roof tiles, and glass in prefab sizes such as 1.20, 1.60, and 2.40 m. This made it easy for local builders to build, easy to maintain. Plus, it saves money, and reduces waste.”

Single-Storey House

“Using vertical louvre fins is a technique that gives the house its character. They are architectural features that blend beautifully with the overall design. This is evident in the way every roof rafter is positioned to coincide with the top end of the vertical fin. Although in different sizes, the vertical fins are placed at regular intervals, resulting in a clean and simple exterior.” 

Single-Storey House

Embraced by nature, the house is well planned every step of the way. All elements are arranged in such a way that best accomplishes a particular purpose. More than anything else, it’s about living in peaceful harmony with the land, the water, the trees, even the fireflies. For Puchong, building a retirement home for his beloved Grandpa is the absolutely right thing to do.

Single-Storey House

Story: Patsiri Chotpongsun
Photography: Soopakorn Srisakul

 

 

Quiet Interaction of Nature and Architecture

Quiet Interaction of Nature and Architecture

BANGKOK / Attaporn Kobkongsanti, his wife Romanee, and their young son Phumi have moved into their new house, which took six years to design and build. Now it shows a perfect picture, lofty white walls rising above its inspired design and meticulous construction.

“As an architect myself, I imagined a courtyard here. Having worked with Boonlert, I felt our styles were really in sync, and after a few iterations we settled on our fourth design, which is what you see here!” Pok, who is the owner not only of the house, but also TROP Landscape Architects, is referring to Boonlert Hemvijitraphan of Boon Design, his co-designer.

trop

Boonlert adds, “The relationship between the house and nature is always at the core of our design work. The owner’s imagination is what makes this one unique. We began with a set of high walls with the separate spaces between them assigned to different uses. We call this concept ‘series of wall.”

TROP Landscape Architects,

To the architects, “series of wall” is expressed with four very tall walls set in parallel that establish the frame of this 3-storey house. The walls are set between 2.5 and 5 meters apart, protruding out beyond the main body of the house, with varied height and length according to functionality of the spaces between. Floor 1 holds living room, dining area, and kitchen. Husband and wife have a workroom on the 2nd floor, and bedrooms are on the 3rd.

The personalities of the in-house gardens differ according to position. At the east entrance we see a mixture of kitchen vegetable and decorative garden they call the “moon garden,” since a moonrise is especially gorgeous from there. Special attention was paid to its beauty, as it is the first garden we see when getting out of the car and the last before leaving. 

Next we encounter a triangular courtyard, inserted in the living room! This is an architectural artifice to bring light into a darker area. It opens the living room right out on the swimming pool and at the same time welcomes us into the room, creating an intriguing space facing both inward and outward.

Closing off areas between walls before assigning them functions as rooms gave the look of, as the architects put it, “putting people in the in-between spaces.” Areas of use are rectangular, enclosed lengthwise between the walls. The front and rear of the house are all floor-to-ceiling clear glass, for a free, airy feeling everywhere, the natural world outside shining through into the home. The walls are thick, blocking the sun’s heat from the north and south. The glass sides bring in the sun’s natural light as it moves from east to west, keeping the house bright and cheerful all day.

TROP Landscape Architects, TROP Landscape Architects,

The walls also facilitate inner courtyards that are part and parcel of the livable space and bring the outside garden in, using the owner’s unique talents and experience to incorporate landscape architecture into the building itself.

“This wasn’t easy,” said Pok. “We wanted it all, here, there, everywhere, but when you do it you always worry it might be too much! We went back and forth, and in end we chose the most orderly form.”

Attaporn Kobkongsanti Attaporn KobkongsantiAttaporn Kobkongsanti

In the kitchen there’s yet another large courtyard. This one helps draw light and clean air into the various rooms from the topmost down to the ground floor, and connects with a forest garden behind the house to the west. Between house and fence is a copse of trees that filters the afternoon sun, a space used just to relax, or perhaps for a party.

The L-shaped swimming pool is landscaped in with a neat wooden porch that fits perfectly with the tall trees Pok has freely planted all about. This garden also connects to the living room through a large clear glass door, creating even more unity between indoors and outdoors.

Attaporn KobkongsantiAttaporn Kobkongsanti Attaporn Kobkongsanti

The house glass reflects the darker forested area in a wavy green. Our landscape architect compares it to an abstract painting by nature itself, saying it took away any need for hanging pictures on the walls, which are bare, like a white canvas, waiting for nature as the single artist to brush it with light.

TROP Landscape Architects,

Story: Korakot Lordkam
Photography: Soopakorn, Nantiya

For the design duo Jutamas Buranajade and Piti Amraranga, the power of interest drives learning that culminates in in-depth knowledge of the technique, design and function.

For the design duo Jutamas Buranajade and Piti Amraranga, the power of interest drives learning that culminates in in-depth knowledge of the technique, design and function.

Jutamas Buranajade and Piti Amraranga are designer laureates and founders of the studio “o-d-a”, which is short for “Object Design Alliance”. They’re widely regarded for their original and unique creativeness.

Jutamas, who specializes in product design, is a graduate of Silpakorn University, while Piti did his graphic design degree at the Faculty of Decorative Arts, the same alma mater.

For the design duo, their career is a continuous journey to experience every aspect of art and design. Piti started out as a complete novice in the field of woodworking. But it’s the power of interest that’s led to more effective learning and eventually culminated in in-depth knowledge in the technique, design and function.

o-d-a A PASSION FOR WOODWORKING / LESSON 3 THE MAKING OF A WOODEN STOOL o-d-a A PASSION FOR WOODWORKING / LESSON 3 THE MAKING OF A WOODEN STOOL

Over the years they’ve learned the trade from various master craftsmen including Phisanu Numsiriyothin, who clearly had a good influence on them, Their chief asset lies in the use of the imagination and original ideas that keep everything simple yet attractive.

o-d-a A PASSION FOR WOODWORKING / LESSON 3 THE MAKING OF A WOODEN STOOL o-d-a A PASSION FOR WOODWORKING / LESSON 3 THE MAKING OF A WOODEN STOOL

It’s a subtle approach to keeping a balance between the processing of raw materials and industrial manufacture without sacrificing quality and uniqueness. Along this line of thinking, Jutamas and Piti proudly present the Rush Chair, a collection of woven rush chairs and stools made from green wood.

o-d-a A PASSION FOR WOODWORKING / LESSON 3 THE MAKING OF A WOODEN STOOL o-d-a A PASSION FOR WOODWORKING / LESSON 3 THE MAKING OF A WOODEN STOOL o-d-a A PASSION FOR WOODWORKING / LESSON 3 THE MAKING OF A WOODEN STOOL

It’s a design that speaks for the trees, thereby saving them from harm and destruction. Precisely, if a seat can be made out of wooden sticks, then there’s no need to cut down any tree, a win-win situation for both humans and forests.

As Piti put it, “For the most part, designers have a good knowledge of lumber yard timber that’s been sawn into planks or partially prepared for construction. But we think it’s time to change the way we do things. The making of furniture from wooden sticks presents several challenges that must be overcome, ranging from debarking to reducing moisture content in wood.”

o-d-a A PASSION FOR WOODWORKING / LESSON 3 THE MAKING OF A WOODEN STOOL o-d-a A PASSION FOR WOODWORKING / LESSON 3 THE MAKING OF A WOODEN STOOL o-d-a A PASSION FOR WOODWORKING / LESSON 3 THE MAKING OF A WOODEN STOOL

 The stick chair with woven seat made of hyacinth fiber from Ayutthaya comes in handy as the prototype of the Rush Chair series. It’s become the inspiration for anyone wanting to try their hand at simple furniture making. Plus, it requires only a few hand tools, while the wooden sticks and rush used in seat weaving vary widely from one area to another. Together, they bring the power of storytelling that adds value to local products.

o-d-a A PASSION FOR WOODWORKING / LESSON 3 THE MAKING OF A WOODEN STOOL

He said, “We view easy yet stylish furniture making with optimism. Anyone can do his or her own DYI furniture project. It’s a way to self-reliance and taking care of the surroundings. It’s different from commercial furniture, which requires a lot of energy and resources to manufacture. As for Rush Chair, if you make it, you can fix it. One day when it’s not repairable, you can discard it without harming the environment because everything about it is biodegradable.”

o-d-a A PASSION FOR WOODWORKING / LESSON 3 THE MAKING OF A WOODEN STOOL

Jutamas Buranajade and Piti Amraranga of the o-d-a studio are among subject matter experts being featured in an online course of study titled “A Passion for Woodworking.” It’s part of BaanLaeSuan Classroom,  a collaboration with CEA, or the Creative Economy Agency (Public Organization). The program is designed for people interested in woodworking and those looking to acquire basic carpentry skills through furniture making using basic tools and community resources, plus plenty of tips for developing a career in creative business. The show is hosted by Jeremiah Pitakwong, Editor of BaanLaeSuan Magazine. Start learning today at LivingASEAN.com. 

o-d-a A PASSION FOR WOODWORKING / LESSON 3 THE MAKING OF A WOODEN STOOL o-d-a A PASSION FOR WOODWORKING / LESSON 3 THE MAKING OF A WOODEN STOOL

Source: 
https://www.baanlaesuan.com/online-program/classroom/215127.html
https://www.baanlaesuan.com/78250/design/design-update/product/rush-chair
https://www.baanlaesuan.com/69289/baanlaesuan-fair/o-d-a

Renovation Adds Sunny Personality to “Nobita House”

Renovation Adds Sunny Personality to “Nobita House”

BANGKOK / Here’s the story of a home renovation done right. Cherishing memories of the good old days, Chatchawan and Punjama Lertbutsayanukul recently had grandma and grandpa’s house restored to its former glory. They sought advice from Jun Sekino of Jun Sekino A+D, who turned it into a beautifully crafted home with added personality and character.

Sharing his renovation ideas, Jun Sekino said: “After having talked with the homeowners, we were determined to keep the front-gable house plan very much intact. Several inspection visits in the ensuing days also gave me some ideas to do it right. It was like a journey back in time to preserve all its 1940’s splendor.”

Here’s the story of a home renovation done right. Cherishing memories of the good old days, Chatchawan and Punjama Lertbutsayanukul recently had grandma and grandpa’s house restored to its former glory. They sought advice from Jun Sekino of Jun Sekino A+D, who turned it into a beautifully crafted home with added personality and character.Here’s the story of a home renovation done right. Cherishing memories of the good old days, Chatchawan and Punjama Lertbutsayanukul recently had grandma and grandpa’s house restored to its former glory. They sought advice from Jun Sekino of Jun Sekino A+D, who turned it into a beautifully crafted home with added personality and character.
The old house before renovation.

The 80-year-old house soon transformed into a new home that’s more warm and inviting. It’s aptly named “Nobita House” after the much-loved, fictional boy character in the 1970’s cartoon series “Doraemon”. In the fewest possible words, it’s about rebuilding for a better future.

 

Restoring the old house to a good state of repair, the architect made sure the original framework was not damaged or impaired in any way. Thanks to collaboration with a team of structural engineers, the carport was reinforced to make it capable of accommodating two vehicles side by side. The front façade was built of reclaimed timber from the old house installed vertically with protective finishes over the top to protect it from the elements.

The gable roof was improved using new material and sloping at an angle that’s proper under the circumstances. To make room for a higher ceiling, the second floor was built 1.50 meters taller than the original plan. On the ground floor, suspended panels were removed to reveal awesome ceilings with exposed wood beams. At the same time, wood windows and extra units of construction were added on to increase the floor space from 100 to 300 square meters.

 

Where appropriate, a system of micropiles was erected to carry an additional load. The covered shelter in front of the entrance was enlarged, while the side of the house reserved for shoe storage connected conveniently to the carport. Meantime, fully open layouts translate into better natural light and ample space for social cohesiveness. On one side, the exterior glass wall looks out over a backyard garden. On another lies a corridor leading to a small courtyard at the rear.

Here’s the story of a home renovation done right. Cherishing memories of the good old days, Chatchawan and Punjama Lertbutsayanukul recently had grandma and grandpa’s house restored to its former glory. They sought advice from Jun Sekino of Jun Sekino A+D, who turned it into a beautifully crafted home with added personality and character. Here’s the story of a home renovation done right. Cherishing memories of the good old days, Chatchawan and Punjama Lertbutsayanukul recently had grandma and grandpa’s house restored to its former glory. They sought advice from Jun Sekino of Jun Sekino A+D, who turned it into a beautifully crafted home with added personality and character. Here’s the story of a home renovation done right. Cherishing memories of the good old days, Chatchawan and Punjama Lertbutsayanukul recently had grandma and grandpa’s house restored to its former glory. They sought advice from Jun Sekino of Jun Sekino A+D, who turned it into a beautifully crafted home with added personality and character.

Thanks to open floor plans, the interior  living spaces are easy on the eye. White walls with stained wood trim paired with natural light streaming in through the overhead transom create the illusion of a larger space. Nearby, white screens and Terrazzo floors combine to add vintage touches to home décor. Meanwhile, structural components made of steel, if any, are painted white to blend harmoniously with light backgrounds.

Here’s the story of a home renovation done right. Cherishing memories of the good old days, Chatchawan and Punjama Lertbutsayanukul recently had grandma and grandpa’s house restored to its former glory. They sought advice from Jun Sekino of Jun Sekino A+D, who turned it into a beautifully crafted home with added personality and character. Here’s the story of a home renovation done right. Cherishing memories of the good old days, Chatchawan and Punjama Lertbutsayanukul recently had grandma and grandpa’s house restored to its former glory. They sought advice from Jun Sekino of Jun Sekino A+D, who turned it into a beautifully crafted home with added personality and character.

The second floor contains workspace with wood windows that evoke memories of years past. Wall paneling is flush with adjoining post and beam construction. The door frame with overhead transom is glazed using patterned glass. Not far away lies the restful master bedroom that’s furnished in a simple style. The old living quarters for house workers accessible by a mosaic walkway remain intact. It’s separated from a nearby outdoor laundry room by steel railing along the edge.

Here’s the story of a home renovation done right. Cherishing memories of the good old days, Chatchawan and Punjama Lertbutsayanukul recently had grandma and grandpa’s house restored to its former glory. They sought advice from Jun Sekino of Jun Sekino A+D, who turned it into a beautifully crafted home with added personality and character.Here’s the story of a home renovation done right. Cherishing memories of the good old days, Chatchawan and Punjama Lertbutsayanukul recently had grandma and grandpa’s house restored to its former glory. They sought advice from Jun Sekino of Jun Sekino A+D, who turned it into a beautifully crafted home with added personality and character.Here’s the story of a home renovation done right. Cherishing memories of the good old days, Chatchawan and Punjama Lertbutsayanukul recently had grandma and grandpa’s house restored to its former glory. They sought advice from Jun Sekino of Jun Sekino A+D, who turned it into a beautifully crafted home with added personality and character.

There are tall buildings nearby, while the house ground level is lower than the street. To effectively drain rainwater from the yard, decorative landscaping gravel is used. This is where garden designer Premrudee Cheewakoseth comes into play and where possible turns the ground into beautiful Japanese rock gardens.

Here’s the story of a home renovation done right. Cherishing memories of the good old days, Chatchawan and Punjama Lertbutsayanukul recently had grandma and grandpa’s house restored to its former glory. They sought advice from Jun Sekino of Jun Sekino A+D, who turned it into a beautifully crafted home with added personality and character.

Trees that are planted for shade include Jackfruit and bamboo, while Mini Mondo Grass or Sneak Beard provides a lush ground covering. To avoid looking too Japanese, small terraces with garden path are put in. Overall, the house boasts certain appeal similar to that of the house of “Nobita”, the much-loved, fictional boy character in the famous cartoon series “Doraemon”.

Here’s the story of a home renovation done right. Cherishing memories of the good old days, Chatchawan and Punjama Lertbutsayanukul recently had grandma and grandpa’s house restored to its former glory. They sought advice from Jun Sekino of Jun Sekino A+D, who turned it into a beautifully crafted home with added personality and character.

Design: Jun Sekino A+D
Landscape design: D.garden design by Premrudee Cheewakoseth
Owners: Chatchawan and Punjama Lertbutsayanukul
Story: Samutcha Viraporn
Photographs: Soopakorn Srisakul
Style: Suanpuk Stylist

Kampong House the Allure of Indonesia’s Urban Village Life

Kampong House the Allure of Indonesia’s Urban Village Life

CIMAHI, WEST JAVA / For an Indonesian family, life in an urban kampong is a beautiful journey. Aquino Krishadi and Elis Rosmiati lived for some time in a medium-density urban kampong, which is Indonesian for village. The positive feeling that they cherish is brought with them as they move into a new home in Cimahi, roughly ten minutes’ drive from Bandung Metropolis in West Java.

Kampong House

 

Their new house is designed by Ismail Solehudin of Ismail Solehudin Architecture. Reflecting the Indonesian village experience, the siding materials that enclose and divide interior living spaces are made of rigid PVC sheets mixed with brick masonry. It’s a creative way to build, plus it provides excellent toughness and good moisture resistance.

Made for living green in a small space, the new dwelling is aptly named “Kampong in House” for the character and real certain appeal of village life that gave them the inspiration.

 

 

Sharing hispoints of view, Ismail Solehudin said that the design was based on the client experience from having lived in an urban village, plus their interest in a sustainable way of living, albeit in a small space. In so doing, hetranslated these ideas into a coherent distribution of masses and expertly crafted houseplan that divides the interior and exterior spaces.

 

Kampong House

The front of the house features an eclectic mix of items and decorations ubiquitous among urban villages across Indonesia. They include different textures and materials that come together in an untidy way. Among them are ornaments such as window box planters, skylights, gardenareas and unfilled spaces in the wall that drive natural ventilation.

 

Commenting on a hybrid of brickwork and PVC sheets, Ismail said that PVC is strong and durable, which explains why it’sone of the most widely used thermoplastic polymers worldwide. Here, it’s used on the façade to protect against damage from too much sun and rain. Meantime, exposed brick walls provide great opportunities to experiment with various textures and patterns. The break in the wall allows fresh air to enter and circulate in the interior, a perfect solution for houses in a tropical climate. 

 

Step inside, and you come to anopen area with green space that’s an essential room in the house. It conveniently connects to a plant-filled living room, kitchen, and a large backyard garden. In all places, unfilled spaces in the wall and green areascreate microclimatesthat differ from those in the surrounding areas. Plus, they allow natural light and improve air circulation at the same time.

Kampong HouseKampong HouseKampong HouseKampong House

Cocooned in a comforting way, bedrooms are slightly hidden from view reachable via an interior corridor lined with functions that serve practical purposes, among them a bar table and a few book shelves.

 

All things considered, it’s a designthat promotes interactions among family members without intruding into their lives. It turns expertly crafted design into a home where living green isn’t just helping the environment or better quality of life. It’s also a way to bring you back in time and experience the Indonesian way of life as it’s always been.

Kampong House Kampong House

The House Plan & Section

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Story: Living ASEAN
Design: Ismail Solehudin Architecture
Photography: Mario Wibowo

SCOPE Promsri Condominium; Feeling Good Living Better World Class Real Estate in the Heart of Sukhumvit

SCOPE Promsri Condominium; Feeling Good Living Better World Class Real Estate in the Heart of Sukhumvit

BANGKOK / Designed to improve the quality of life, SCOPE Promsri sits on a prime residential lot in the heart of Sukhumvit, one of Bangkok’s vibrant cosmopolitan areas. Among its most outstanding features is the integration of the high-end contemporary furniture brand Ligne Roset of France with the overall design of every room and common area. A nexus between well thought-out design, best appliances brands and urban lifestyle conveniences, the 1.35-billion-Baht eight-story condo comes complete with a security system that exceeds standards for residential property management.

SCOPE Promsri

SCOPE Promsri is conveniently situated on Soi Promsri, a prime street that connects with three famous city thoroughfares; namely Soi Prompong (Sukhumvit 39), Soi Klang (Sukhumvit 49), and Soi Thonglor (Sukhunvit 55). The intention is to become a premium residential project capable of providing its residents with a world class service.

SCOPE Promsri

What makes SCOPE Promsri exceptionally good is the overall interior design paired with matching contemporary furniture by Ligne Roset, a high end brand that has been around for more than 160 years. Founded in 1860, Ligne Roset grew from humble beginnings and transformed itself into a successful furnishings outfit with branches across the globe. Over time, modern luxury furniture and decorative accessories have earned the company a reputation as experts in design and innovative manufacturing processes. The secret to its success lies in strict quality control that culminates in unique products that are not only handsome and comfortable, but also a profusion of elegance and value characteristic of French design.

SCOPE Promsri

Yongyuth Chaipromprasith is creative expert in real estate development and CEO of the SCOPE Co, Ltd, which specializes in homes at the international premium level. He said: “We commit ourselves to providing quality and innovative design that has been our signature from day one. Every project that we’ve accomplished are the product of collaborations between us and other experts in the field, including world famous brands. When it comes to home furnishings, it’s not about selecting products from catalogs. Rather, it’s an act of working with others who have comprehensive knowledge and skill in a bid to create products that are evidence of quality and best express our ideas.”

SCOPE Promsri

By this is meant that SCOPE Promsri places great emphasis on the individual’s privacy and freedom from being disturbed by others. Hence, there are only two business units, compared to 146 residential condominium units on the premises. First and foremost, it’s designed to raise the quality of life and improve safety for the project’s residents. This is evident in the installation of water sprinklers in the ceiling of every room, despite it not being required by law governing eight-story buildings.

That’s not all. At SCOPE Promsri every condominium comes complete with modern conveniences and household appliances that comply with standards. They include electrical kitchen appliances by the MIELE brand of Germany, plus built-in combinations consisting of a microwave oven, induction cook top, kitchen exhaust fan, and built-in Liebherr brand refrigerator, as well as wall-mounted washlets by Kohler, Germany.

SCOPE Promsri

Apart from the full complement of world class equipment, every condo unit receives a great deal on decoration known as “Promsri Edition Fully Furnished Package”, an 890,000-Baht value that includes, among other things, a Prado sofa by Christian Werner. Customers are allowed to choose more than one color for the sofa. Plus, there’s a special edition table code named “Promsri Table”, which is manufactured exclusively by Ligne Roset for this project only. And that’s not all. The list also includes a built-in console that comes with a 75-inch TV set, bed with headboard decorating ideas and mattress by Simmons, the world class brand that’s used by six star hotels across the globe.

SCOPE Promsri

Strictly speaking, the Promsri Edition is more than just a list of household equipment or furniture. Rather, it opens the door to a new lifestyle evolving around feeling good and living better ideas. It’s about nurturing quality thoughts that culminate in good design for homes at the international premium level.

Yongyuth added: “SCOPE Promsri has invested a lot of money to create a good first impression with the project’s exterior design. But the quality that pleases the aesthetic senses alone isn’t enough. That’s why we also place great emphasis on long term durability and ease of maintenance. This is evident in the use of reflective glass acoustic film that not only protects resident privacy, but also reduces heat transfer from outside, thereby saving on energy consumption. Plus, it doubles as sound barrier that reduces street noise by as much as 30%, a feature that’s further enhanced by motorized blackout blinds for added indoor thermal comfort. It’s designed to achieve total darkness in the room, especially for customers in the young international premium group who requires the highest quality of rest. This is particularly important for the so-called work-hard, high-income group.”

“SCOPE gives good living conditions the highest priority. For this reason, it provides a variety of services including safe transport of food items and cleaning service. It’s a luxury condo that not only allows pets, but also is truly pet friendly. By enforcing carefully thought-out rules and regulations, it ensures that pet owners and non-pet owners can live together in harmony.”

SCOPE PromsriSCOPE Promsri SCOPE Promsri

SCOPE Promsri condos complete with the “Promsri Edition Fully Furnished Package” are on sale now for 6.3 million Baht apiece. The scheduled finish date is around November 2022. Unit reservation has begun as of 12 March 2021. Register now at www.scopepromsri.com

SCOPE Promsri

The Elephant World of Surin; Architecture Dedicated to the Asian Pachyderm and the Kuy People

The Elephant World of Surin; Architecture Dedicated to the Asian Pachyderm and the Kuy People

SURIN / This small province about 6 hours’ drive from Bangkok is home to the Elephant World, an architectural landmark dedicated to preserving the warm, good-natured Asian pachyderm. The project extends across 3,000 Rai of land (roughly 1,200 acres) that’s part of the Dong Phu Din National Forest Reserve, one of Surin’s natural attractions.

The Elephant World of Surin

The province is often taken as synonymous with the richness of culture of the Kuy people and the thing they know best – tending the elephant. It’s the way of life that originated in the distant past, one that’s deep-rooted in their thought, behavior and tradition.

Modern day Kuy ethnic communities (also known as Suay) concentrate in the lower region of Thailand’s Northeast, mostly in Surin, while smaller populations can be found in southern Laos, and norther Cambodia.

Located at Baan Ta Klang, Tambon Krapho, Tha Toom District, the Elephant World began in 2001 in a bid to bring vagabond elephants back to their traditional home. It’s the responsibility of the Provincial Administrative Organization of Surin. The project site sits surrounded by ethnic Kuy communities whose way of life has been concerned with the welfare, training and husbandry of elephants since time immemorial. Here, the peaceful Asian pachyderm is treated like family.

The Elephant World of Surin The Elephant World of SurinThe Elephant World of Surin

The Elephant World’s main attraction, the Outdoor Museum, is designed by architect laureate Asst. Prof. Boonserm Premthada of the Bangkok Project Studio. Apart from historical perspective, it provides a particular way of viewing lifelong friendships between humans and elephants.

Continuous vertical structures that enclose and divide exhibition areas are made of more than 480,000 bricks kilned the old-fashioned way. Sculptures set up at intervals tell stories of the role of elephants in ancient times. Together, they merge into stunning walled city vernacular that was the zeitgeist of the past eras.

The Elephant World of Surin The Elephant World of Surin

Currently under construction is the Cultural Center and Elephant Show Court with tiers of seats for spectators and a central space for the presentation of dramatic events. The open structures are supported by concrete poles, while roof framing is crafted of steel with wood slat coverings to allow natural light and good ventilation.

The Elephant World of Surin

A key element that’s easily recognized from a distance is the Lookout Tower that rises as high as a five-story building. 360-degree views can be seen as if from above from here.

The Elephant World of Surin The Elephant World of SurinThe Elephant World of SurinThe Elephant World of SurinThe Elephant World of Surin

Besides the three landmarks mentioned above, the Elephant World also features other interesting attractions. They include the Building of Majestic Elephants, the Elephant Training School, Kuy villages, 3D movie theatre, as well as shops and restaurants. If cultural tourism is your thing, stop by the Elephant World next time you visit Surin. For information, call 0-4414-5050; 0-4451-1975; or visit http://elephantworldsurin.com.

Story and photographs: Nawapat Dusdul

 

Sneak Preview of the BaanLaeSuan Fair Select 2021; A Show on the Theme of “Open Culture”

Sneak Preview of the BaanLaeSuan Fair Select 2021; A Show on the Theme of “Open Culture”

Happening now… The BaanLaeSuan Fair Select 2021. It’s an opportunity not to be missed whether you’re a savvy shopper, pet lover, green thumb, design aficionado, or just looking for a hangout to keep in touch. The show on the theme of “Open Culture” is happening from 17 to 21 March at the Bangkok International Trade and Exhibition Center, or BITEC Bang-Na. Essentially, it’s about keeping an open mind, caring and sharing good designs vital for the betterment of society.

Register here to attend: https://amarinfair.com/go/1922

“Open Culture” is a design trend that’s aimed primarily at achieving a better quality of life. It’s concerned with things we do every day, from creating a design that’s friendly to the environment, to implementing green and sustainable initiatives that can ignite innovation. It opens the door to new possibilities where designers and people in the community work together to arrive at a solution that can ultimately benefit the people and society at large. Here are some of the highlights from this year’s BaanLaeSuan Fair Select.

BaanLaeSuan Fair Select 2021

“Open Books”, BaanLaeSuan Printing and Publishing Zone

The BaanLaeSuan Printing and Publishing Zone features prominently as a large bookstore in the exhibition. Be spoilt for choice when it comes to an enormous richness of publications on homes and gardens, plus new releases issued for viewing and great photography locations. There are plenty of ideas and inspirations for do-it-yourself projects, from growing roses to building your own nursery, to creating multifunctional spaces at home and post-retirement agricultural activity.

BaanLaeSuan Fair Select 2021

Whilst there, stop to browse around the bookstore, or take a moment to enjoy a good read sipping coffee at a café ensconced among beautiful roses. That’s not all. BaanLaeSuan Classroom is also giving classes on popular subjects, including how to grow cactuses from seeds and preparing garden soil for growing roses. If roses are your thing, drop by one of these classes at Hall 101.

BaanLaeSuan Fair Select 2021

“Open Culture”, The Main Entryway

Here’s the main entrance to the show on the theme of “Open Culture”. Elsewhere, different exhibition zones are marked by different archways. Each of them is designed to be easily recognized and communicate the idea about what’s on display. If you’re looking for plants and decorative items for the garden, look for Hall 98 whose entrance is aptly adorned with healthy green foliage.

BaanLaeSuan Fair Select 2021

“Open Playground”, BaanLaeSuan Pets Zone

The BaanLaeSuan Pets Zone is a playground for pet lovers. It’s an area for your pet cats and dogs to play in. Whilst there, take a moment to attend workshops organized by BaanLaeSuan Classroom. They include lessons in hand embroidery by Leerapat Kasantikul, and practical exhibitions of how collars, leashes and toy balls for cats and dogs are made. It’s also a place to shop snacks and household articles, plus cat, dog and puppy toys. Carefully selected retailers in are on hand to please every pet person. Feeling tired? Sit down for beautiful relaxing music and give your canine or feline friends a treat. It’s happening at Hall 99.

BaanLaeSuan Fair Select 2021BaanLaeSuan Fair Select 2021BaanLaeSuan Fair Select 2021

“Open Garden”, the Garden of Ideas

The Garden of Ideas Zone at BaanLaeSuan Fair Select has typically focused on the defining spirit or mood of a particular period. This time around, we feel the whole world is concerned about the future the environment and there’s an intense longing for a return to nature. That said, the concept of “Natural Climate” comes in handy to convey ideas about natural growth. Because plants grow differently depending on the surroundings and trends at any given time, we think it appropriate to present four different types of landscaping in the exhibition. Meantime, BaanLaeSuan Classroom is also giving classes on picture painting with watercolors using materials from nature. Stop by for ideas for growing:

1. Desert Plants
2. Edible Gardens
3. Wetland Plants
4. Exotic Plants

BaanLaeSuan Fair Select 2021 BaanLaeSuan Fair Select 2021BaanLaeSuan Fair Select 2021

“Open Space”, room Magazine Showcase

Discover, connect, and keep yourself updated of developments in design, space utilization, furniture, and home decorations the moment you come in through the main entryway at Hall 101. Here, the concept of “Open Space” is featured prominently to call your attention to how spaces can be made to serve a variety of functions, from a rest area to common area and workspace that makes a good first impression. The semi-outdoor design gives a sense of openness and connectivity reminiscent of a home and corridor restaurant that’s comfortable, exotic and warm.

The room Magazine Showcase is the coming together of a bookstore, café, and music, plus an exhibition on the concept of Betterism, which essentially is about good design for better society. Here, custom products by groups of individuals as well as private and government sectors are on display. They include bamboo furniture that’s the product of a collaboration between BaanLaeSuan and Mae Jaem Model Plus, a social enterprise. In essence, it’s about increasing production at community levels.

BaanLaeSuan Fair Select 2021

Chang Green Oasis

Tired from too much walking? Why not sit down and relax at Chang Green Oasis? Decorated with gorgeous greenery, it’s a rest area designed to accommodate exhibition goers. You will love live music. Plus, there are plenty of refreshing drinks to satisfy every thirst, including Asian Blend coffee. Give it a try.

Story:  Sarayut Sreetip-ard, Special Activity, BaanLaeSuan Magazine
Photo: Soopakorn Srisakul, Nuntiya

Suppapong Sonsang; A Furniture Designer Who Grows Forests to Fulfill His Timber Needs

Suppapong Sonsang; A Furniture Designer Who Grows Forests to Fulfill His Timber Needs

Some ten years ago, Suppapong Sonsang rose to fame as a laureate of the Designer of the Year award. Apparently content with living a green lifestyle, he kind of vanished from the limelight and got into a different field, something more upstream.

He brought 70 rai of destroyed forest land back to life in a bid to generate enough timber supplies for Jird Design Gallery, his very own furniture brand. Committed to sustainable growth, he viewed the mammoth undertakings as crucial for the future of his career as designer.

Lesson 2 Understanding Wood / Learn from Suppapong Sonsang, a furniture designer of Jird Design Gallery.

In a recent meet-up with room Magazine, he said: “The design profession is dependent upon purchase orders and customer hiring contracts. To do a good job or run a business well, skill alone isn’t enough. You also need a readiness to accomplish the task, reliable resources, even luck, et cetera. So I set out to find a green route for business to continue to perform for a long time; meanwhile, relying less on hiring contracts and more on selling direct to end-users. I viewed the practice of growing and caring for timber forests as a basic occupation with some hope for the future.” 

Suppapong Sonsang

Suppapong started his first new growth forest at Kamphaeng Phet Province in lower northern Thailand and gradually expanded to Nong Pho, Ratchaburi. The latter has since served as his headquarters with storage facilities for partly prepared timber and logs. There’s a sawmill with 4-5 types of machinery, where logs are cut, sawn into lumber and packaged ready for delivery. As business grew, he converted his humble abode in the forest into a showroom.

As he put it, “Timber is a valuable resource. So I focus on planting only trees that have economic importance. Little by little, I searched for knowledge and experimented with various methods in a bid to achieve the desirable outcome. Eventually, I obtained not only the resources needed for furniture making, but also a workplace with the atmosphere of a nature reserve. Before anything else, it’s about the better quality of life.” 

Suppapong Sonsang

Suppapong’s forests are home to valuable ecosystems. Apart from hardwood trees that are grown for timber, he also set aside some areas for planting crops. His work on the farm encompasses three aspects of product manufacturing, including design, human resources, and forest resources management.

Sharing his work experience, Suppapong said: “I’m responsible for design while others are busy taking care of things, ranging from caring for the forest floor and planting new trees, to grafting branches and growing plants from seeds in nurseries. Everyone deserves a good quality of life. For people in the community who’re working with us, it’s an opportunity to learn new skills in carpentry and agriculture. The knowledge that they gain as apprentices will be an asset beneficial to their future career.

Suppapong Sonsang

“Meantime, the forests that we grow ensure that our furniture business will be adequately resourced for a long time to come, in other words until death do us part. It will be another 20 to 30 years down the road before some of the trees become fully grown and ready for harvesting. That said, it’s a guarantee that our community will still have timber supply lasting us a hundred years, or after old growth forests have been depleted.”

“While others invest in big manufacturing facilities and expensive machines, we put our money in land that we need to grow forests for timber. Oftentimes, people asked why we chose land covered with trees and undergrowth instead of beautiful pieces of property elsewhere. Well, it may be of little value to them. But it’s a great asset both for us and for the community 20 years down the road. We will have access to timber that our business needs. To begin with, it’s about growing healthy forest ecosystems. That means you need the initial capital, and patience. You have to give it all your energy to succeed. Been there, survived that. And now the rest is easy,” said Suppapong laughing.

Suppapong Sonsang

“From then until now, little went as planned. Success came from resilience and the ability to adapt to new challenges. The workers that we hired from the community had no carpentry skill. So we started training them while the trees still had a long way to grow and mature. We believe that by the time our forests are ready for harvesting, our helping hands will have become well versed in woodworking. In the meantime, we just have to keep up with design trends. Together, they constitute parallel paths to future growth.”  

Suppapong Sonsang

Above, a bench seat from the KOOPREE collection by Suppapong Sonsang is made of timber from KrathinThepa (scientific name: Acacia mangium) a species of fast growing tree in the pea family Fabaceae. Harvested at 7 years of age, the tree provides an alternative to hardwood commonly used in furniture making.

Suppapong Sonsang of Jird Design Gallery is one of subject matter experts being featured in an online curriculum titled, “A Passion for Woodworking”. It’s part of Baan Lae Suan Classroom, a collaboration with the Creative Economy Agency (Public Organization), or CEA. The program is designed for people interested in woodworking and those looking to acquire basic carpentry skills through furniture making using basic tools and community resources. Plus, it provides tips for developing a career in creative business. The program is hosted by Jeremiah Pitakwong, Editor of Baan Lae Suan Magazine.

Suppapong Sonsang

In the previous video, we presented a lesson on the Milking Stool by distinguished designer/carpenter Phisanu Numsiriyothin. In this episode, Suppapong Sonsang shows the steps in transforming homegrown timber into a beautiful bench seat. 

Source: 
https://www.baanlaesuan.com/online-program/classroom/215124.html
https://www.baanlaesuan.com/181474/design/design-update/people/jird

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