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ASEAN Art Plays Vital Social Media Roles

ASEAN Art Plays Vital Social Media Roles

The art of the ASEAN is shining with excitement at the Bangkok Art Biennale 2018. Besides encouraging creative thinking through their works, artists from around the Region see their expressions as a tool to communicate their enthusiasm, raise their concerns, and get people to think about various social and environmental issues. Their thought-provoking visuals and other artistic designs reflect how art is playing a vital role within the community much like social media is used to connect with people and foster new ideas. Our Living ASEAN team has explored the works of visual art on display and filed this report. Check it out!

/// THAILAND ///
Story: Singhanart Nakpongphun /// Photography: Rithirong Chanthongsuk, Anupong Chaisukkasem, Singhanart Nakpongphun, Woradon Chansiri

The Association of Southeast Asian Nations, ASEAN for short, is a regional organization committed to promoting cooperation and facilitating economic and sociocultural integration among its ten member states, which include Myanmar, Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam, Brunei, Malaysia, Singapore, the Philippines, and Indonesia. The ASEAN population is estimated at 635 million.

Country: Cambodia
Title: National Road No. 5
Artist: Lim Sokchanlina
Venue: The Bangkok Art and Culture Center (BACC), 7th Floor

Lim Sokchanlina is a photographer and founder of the artist group “Stiev Selepak” that’s known for works in various disciplines ranging from photography to installation to performance art. His expressions often reflect with gloominess on socio-economic conditions in Cambodia. Worthy of attention is the work of visual art titled “Sa Sa Bassac Art Project”, which he recently exhibited at the Sydney Biennial, Australia. He also debuted his latest work titled “Sunshower: Contemporary Art from Southeast Asia from the 1980s to Now” at the Mori Art Museum in Tokyo in 2017.

“National Road No. 5”, his exhibit at the Bangkok Art Biennale 2018, tells stories of overwhelming distress after people’s homes have been torn down to make room for the development of a project along the Thai-Cambodian border. Timber that’s eroded by being exposed to the weather tells an unforgettable tale of heartbreak after people’s lives have been altered by the expansion process of a capitalist economy.

A sculptural installation titled “Rekayasa Genetika” (REGEN) by Heri Dono. Press the button to get the message.
A sculptural installation titled “Rekayasa Genetika” (REGEN) by Heri Dono.
A work of visual art titled “Flying Angels” on show at the East Asiatic Building
A work of visual art titled “Flying Angels” on show at the East Asiatic Building

Country: Indonesia
Titles: “Rekayasa Genetika” (REGEN), and “Flying Angels”
Artist: Heri Dono
Venues: The Bangkok Art and Culture Center (BACC), 7th Floor; the East Asiatic Building; and the Hotel Peninsula

“Rekayasa Genetika” (REGEN) is sculptural installation by Indonesian artist Heri Dono. Surprising in a way that’s unique to his artistic ability, the exhibit is appreciated for its beauty of non-verbal expression and strong emotional power. The human like sculptures showing the effect of mutation get their inspiration from Indonesia’s shadow puppetry known as Wayang. The sculptural works are made of a variety of objets trouves ranging from fiberglass and wood to electronic gadgets and electric fans. Art lovers can interact with the exhibits by pressing the button provided. Besides the mutants, Heri also debuts “Flying Angels” at the East Asiatic Building for the duration of Bangkok Art Biennale 2018. Meantime, another squadron of “Flying Angels” are on view at the Hotel Peninsula Bangkok.

Country: Myanmar
Title: The Check Point
Artist: Nge Lay
Venues: The Bangkok Art and Culture Center (BACC), 7th Floor

The Check Point by Myanmar artist Nge Lay sends a tactful reminder that says, “Everyone must come through that door.” It reflects a situation in which people experience a clash of opposing needs or wishes in daily living. A graduate of the Yangon University of Culture, the artist pursued a career in ornaments and accessories design until 2003 when she made the switch to live performance art and photography. Her works of visual art oftentimes touch on the perception of social and historical circumstances and the prospects of Myanmar’s politics. Since 2009, she has exhibited at various art scenes including the Singapore Biennale 2013 and the 8th Asia-Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art.

The artist’s entry in the Bangkok Art Biennale 2018 is a bloggable installation that calls attention to gender inequality. Through it, she deals with the subject of different treatment or perceptions of individuals due to their gender. The most important point at issue is whether it be good or bad, rich or poor, saint or sinner, everyone is born into the world through that door. Yet, the idea that men and women are not equal remains a major barrier to human development. Aptly named “The Check Point”, the installation tells their stories of what seems like the eternal conflict between the sexes. The artwork that resembles a woman’s outer garment consists of eight types of Longyi or sheets of cloth worn by people from various ethnic groups across Myanmar. As the artist puts it: “The work is a combination of different feelings, satisfaction and dissatisfaction, pride and sadness that comes with being a woman. I want to send a message that the door through which we are born into the world should not be regarded as unclean. Hence, the weaker sex should not be oppressed nor treated badly by people in power. A part from motherhood, they represent cultural values, the beauty of nature, and healthy pride in a country.”

Country: The Philippines
Title: The Settlement
Artist: Mark Justiniani
Venues: The Bangkok Art and Culture Center (BACC), 1st Floor

“The Settlement” is a small room that stretches into infinity. Its outer covering is made of timber and old galvanized sheets. Step into the world of Mark Justiniani, and you come before an amazing installation. The visual artist uses mirrors to create an illusion that shows smaller and smaller reflections that appear to recede into endless space and time. In so doing, Justiniani combines his artistic skill with a high degree of knowledge to relive an experience and feelings from the history of the Philippines. He gets his inspiration from stories of national heroes, such as Jose Rizal, Andres Bonifacio, and their struggle to free the island country form colonialism. Justiniani sees understanding of past events as a means to recuperate from unpleasant memories. Illusions come in handy to stimulate a passion for learning and happiness. For those wanting to escape from confused and noisy disturbances, “The Settlement” is a place to be. (Viewers are required to take off their shoes to enter the exhibit.)

Justiniani is among the artists who took part in social movements in the Philippines from the 1980s to the 1990s. Through the years he has earned affection and esteem for contributing to positive change. He won the Thirteen Artists Award from the Cultural Center of the Philippines in 1994. Since then, he has exhibited at major art events worldwide, among them the Asia-Pacific Triennial, the Yokohama Triennial, the Asia Society in New York, the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco, and the National Art Gallery of Singapore.
Country: Malaysia
Title: We die if we don’t dream.
Artist: Sherman Ong
Venue: The Bangkok Art and Culture Center (BACC), 7th Floor

Winner of the 2010 ICON de Martell Cordon Bleu Photography Award, Malaysian artist Sherman Ong has worked in motion pictures and photography in Singapore. She is passionate about the circumstances affecting the relationships between humans and the environment as well as change that’s taking place in modern-day Southeast Asia. Sherman is widely known for her work titled “NUSANTARA: The seas will sing and the wind will carry us” that chronicles long journeys by sea through the Region from past to present. It tells stories in a non-verbal way of movement of people from one area to another as well as cultural assimilation that has come to characterize the social landscape. Over time, as people came in contact with one another, the individuals or groups of different ethnic heritage are absorbed into and become a part of the culture of a society. For the Bangkok Art Biennale, Sherman Ong debuts “We die if we don’t dream” (2018), a thought provoking exhibit about the experience, ideas, and memories of Afghan people in Malaysia.

The Adventure of Sinxay

Country: Laos
Title: The Adventure of Sinxay
Artists: The Thai-Lao Group Hooptam
Venue: BAB Box @ One Bangkok

“The Adventure of Sinxay” is a full-size wall painting in vivacious colors by the Thai-Lao group Hooptam. The painted picture is the result of a confluence of ideas between Songwit Pimpakun, Tanupon En-on, Home-Sawan Umansap of Thailand and two artists from the Lao PDR Tiane Vilayphonechith and Amphonesouk Phaysourine. The amazing work of visual art gets its inspiration from oral literary works about the basic goodness of mankind and courageous character. It tells a story in a powerfully irresistible way about a young man who goes on a long journey to rescue his relative abducted by a giant. Along the way, the story of imaginary persons and events makes reference to the basic teachings of the Buddha, the beliefs associated with the local people, and the mottos that guide them through pain and suffering. For the Bangkok Art Biennale 2018, the artist group gives a different interpretation to the classic story so as to fit in with modern-day circumstances. The leading character begins his journey from the Laotian capital Vientiane, crosses the Mekong River into Thailand, and soon heads for Bangkok. On the way, he confronts many obstacles, among them devils and evil spirits as well as an army of soldiers. Overall, it’s a confusing world dominated by technological advances and online social media.

 

Country: Vietnam
Title: Jrai Dew: A radicle room
Artist: Art Labor
Venue: O. P. Place, 3rd Floor

Artists from Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam came together in 2012 in a bid to find ways of presenting their ideas through non-formal visual art forms. The result was a series of artistic expressions from a unique cultural point of view. The group consisted of artist Thao Nguyen Phan, curator Truong Cong Tung, and author Arlette Quynh-Anh Tran. Together, they experimented with new ideas that went beyond the limits and ventured out into unfamiliar territories. In the process, they discovered “Jrai Dew”, a belief traditional to an ethnic group called Jarai who inhabits remote areas in the highlands of central Vietnam. According to an explanation by Art Labor, the Jarai people believe that humans are an inextricable part of the cycle of nature, a process in which everything is continuously cycled in various forms of the environment. After death, everything begins again like tiny drops of water that form in the cold of night and evaporate when temperatures rise. Likewise, people and the forest in which they live go through a never-ending cycle of change. As the gems of morning disappear, they signal the opening of new opportunities for other things to grow. For the Bangkok Art Biennale 2018, Art Labor debuts “Jrai Dew: A radicle room”, a unique installation that took three years in the making. It’s designed to communicate such a thought provoking idea from the highlands of central Vietnam to its audiences beyond borders.

 

Country: Singapore
Title: A Parade for the Paraders
Artist: Kray Chen
Venue: The Bangkok Art and Culture Center (BACC), 7th Floor

“A Parade for the Paraders” is a triple-screen piece of video art by former members of the Singapore Military Marching Band. The musicians come together to play “Steamroller” in a lively and animated fashion that has made the soldier jogging song more interesting and exciting. The band members are seen without full dress regalia as they march past a deserted school. The relaxed and unconcerned parade may be an unfamiliar sight to see, but the music and the formation are a serious matter. Kray Chen, formerly a member of the marching band, explained that his video art presented a contrast between playfulness and serious performances. The real military marching band spent many hours practicing to achieve perfection before they could play as part of National Day Parades on August 9. His band did not. A harsh reality of life that few people knew was that military marching music was taken so seriously that under normal circumstances, its members weren’t even allowed to perform live in public.

Country: Thailand
Title: The Outlaw’s Flag
Artist: Jakkai Siributr
Venue: The Bangkok Art and Culture Center (BACC), 7th Floor Ambulatory

“The Outlaw’s Flag” by Thai artist Jakkai Siribut is an installation that calls attention to the plight of the Rohingya refugees. Like a very exciting contest, the work of visual art consists of 15 flags that no one knows to what country or people they belong. The only known truth is that the humanitarian crisis caused by violence and discrimination in Myanmar has sent hundreds of thousands of refugees fleeing into neighboring countries. The imaginary flags on display send a message of hope for the future of the Rohingya and urge countries in the region to cooperate in a bid to end terror and suffering that the refugees are facing. The artist is regarded with respect and warm approval for drawing attention to pressing socio-political issues, most notably the challenges faced by the followers of Buddhism in Thailand. He sees the tendency to consider material possessions more important than spiritual values as having a detrimental effect on the Thai way of life. A versatile artist, Jakkai is skillful in using textiles, embroidery techniques, photography and video art in creating beautiful installations that get people to think about the problems that need to be dealt with. He has exhibited at various art destinations in America, Europe, and Asia, most notably the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco, the Asian Civilizations Museum in Singapore, and the Vebih Koc Foundation in Istanbul.

5 Events and Festivals Worth Waiting for

5 Events and Festivals Worth Waiting for

Southeast Asia is renowned for many joyful and exuberant festivities. For the remainder of 2018, it’s worth checking out these highly visible public and social occasions.

/// ASEAN ///

 

Living ASEAN has put together five favorite hangouts for you to pick, from art and culture to festivals and go-to party destinations. If you’re ready, let the journey begin.

Bangkok Art Biennale 2018

Bangkok, Thailand / October 19, 2018 – February 3, 2019

Bangkok Art Biennale 2018 is Thailand’s first international art show featuring works by renowned artists from across the globe including Yayoi Kusama, Marina Abramovic, Yoshitomo Nara, Elmgreen & Dragset, Choi Jeong Hwa, Wisut Ponnimit, Kawita Vatanajyankur, and Lee Bul. The four-month festival will see many exhibitions being held at thriving art scenes across the capital from Buddhist temples to historic places along the River Chao Phrya, even the busy commercial district on Sukhumvit Road. Precisely, it’s aimed at making Bangkok a world art destination.  

For more information: http://www.bkkartbiennale.com/

http://www.baanlaesuan.com/tag/bangkok-art-biennale-2018/


 

Bagan Hot Air Balloon Season

Bagan, Myanmar / October 20, 2018 – April 10, 2019

Imagine you could fly. The hot air balloon ride promises to be an inspiring experience in Bagan. It’s an interesting way to see the ancient city as you drift over the vast archeological site in that’s home to more than 2,000 Buddhist shrines in central Myanmar. The balloon season starts October 20 and lasts until next April. Because only 22 balloons are allowed each day, it’s good to make reservations in advance so that you don’t miss out on early morning flights. Take in the view over a cradle of civilization that began in the early eleventh century. The Old Bagan landscape is gorgeous at sunrise.

Photographs: https://myanmarvels.com


 

Ubud Writers and Readers Festival

Bali, Indonesia / October 24-28

There’s more to the Indonesian archipelago than volcanic mountains, beaches and coral reefs. Nestled in the uplands of Bali, Ubud is a town with a quiet beauty that’s widely known for traditional crafts and performing arts. Every year writers, thinkers, as well as visual and performing artists converge on the town to participate in the Ubud Writers and Readers Festival, which is scheduled for October 24-28. The event in now into its 15th year.

 


 

Cambodian Water Festival – Bon Om Touk

Phnom Penh and Siem Reap, Cambodia / November 21-23

The Cambodian Water Festival or Bon Om Touk is celebrated on November 21-23, which coincides with the end of the rainy season based on the lunar calendar. The occasion symbolizes the abundant life that rivers bring. Cities and towns across the country join in the season of festivity, but the biggest celebration takes place in the capital. The water festival culminates in a boat race on the River Tonle Sap that runs through Phnom Penh and Siem Reap. The rowing boats are a legacy from old-time naval warfare and represent the passing of knowledge from past to present generations.

Photographs: http://global-children.org


 

Zoukout Beach Festival

Siloso Beach, Singapore / December 1

In a mood for partying? Come December 1 Singapore’s Siloso Beach will play host to the largest dusk-to-dawn beach festival with plenty of water activities. The event is much sought after by electronic music fans looking forward to dancing the night away. The fun event organized by Zouk nightclub is now in its 18th year. This year’s festival features the music band Dimitri Vegas and Like Mike, number 2 on DJ Mag’s Top 100 list. Partying starts at nightfall and continues until the morning after. So dance till you drop!

 

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LOY KRATHONG AND WATER FESTIVALS AROUND THE REGION
Sirimongkol: A Spiritual Art Exhibition By Pomme Chan

Sirimongkol: A Spiritual Art Exhibition By Pomme Chan

Bid farewell to 2016 and ring in the New Year with Sirimongkol, an exhibition of works by celebrated illustrator Pomme Chan. The artist got her inspirations from the twelve signs of the Zodiac, which in the Chinese belief system are thought to have profound influences on us humans. The event is on from now until February 12, 2107 at the Jam Factory.

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The spiritual art exhibition is appropriately named “Sirimongkol,” which is Thai for good omens or positive energies believed to foretell the future. Pomme Chan’s masterpieces depict the twelve signs representing the constellations that form the imaginary belt of the heavens. To make it easy to appreciate, the exhibition comes in four parts.

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The first part consists of illustrated works on canvas depicting the 12 animal signs of the Chinese Zodiac. Each sign comes accompanied by floral and botanical ornaments that speak to basic character, preferences, strengths, and weaknesses of individuals.

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The second part is quite a striking collection. Using hand-drawn techniques on paper, the artist lets red and gold play a prominent role in her contemporary interpretation of the Zodiac signs. Sharp geometric shapes blends well with curves and brush strokes from Chinese calligraphy and other symbols of wealth, success, luck, and power.

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The third part is three-dimensional showcasing a futuristic spirit house. The 3D shrine is crafted of clear acrylic sheets illuminated by LED lighting, a collaborative effort between Pomme Chan and interior designer Pruitsatorn Sakulthai. Finally, the fourth part comprises illustrated works printed on 10 porcelain plates and mounted on frames to focus on the meaning of “Sirimongkol” as we know it. May 2017 bring happiness and prosperity to you all.

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Exhibition period: Now – February 12, 2017.
Location: The Jam Factory

For more information, visit www.facebook.com/thejamfactorybangkok

About the artist

Pomme Chan is a Thai illustrator based in London. Her feminine style and detailed illustrated works are recognized worldwide. She has been working with various leading brands and magazines, including Marc Jacobs, Nike, Adidas, Volkswagens, and The New York Times. She is moving back in Thailand, where she has a studio of her own.

10 Most Incredible Airbnb Accommodations in the ASEAN

10 Most Incredible Airbnb Accommodations in the ASEAN

Airbnb.com is not only Bed & Breakfast budget room. Take a peek with us and book a night (or more) in these wonderful Airbnb accommodations for an unforgettable once-in-a-lifetime experience. Enjoy your holidays!

Photos: www.airbnb.com


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– Bamboo Eco Cottage in a Paddy Field / Indonesia –

Only five minutes away from central Ubud stands a woven bamboo house, where nature lovers can fully enjoy a night next to a rice paddy field. The room comes with an outdoor living area and an open-roof bathroom. This is truly a secluded home to relax away from the hustle and bustle of big cities.
https://www.airbnb.com/rooms/744971



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– Stunning Bamboo House by the River / Indonesia –

The title says it all. This Airbnb’s top-picked property is the most favorite among celebrities from around the world. Nestled on the bank of the Ayung River, the whole-bamboo house offers three double-bed bedrooms with en-suite baths, kitchen, lounge, plunge pool, a workspace on the fourth floor. What more could one ask for a perfect luxurious vacation in Bali?
https://www.airbnb.com/rooms/798483


 

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– Superb Property for Movie Shoot or Corporate Event / Singapore –

It’s not common to see a house in Singapore. However, among skyscrapers and high-rise condominiums, there is this large colonial-accent house with a 1-hectare park and a swimming pool available for rent. With a capacity of up to 50 guests, you can even throw an exclusive gala new year here (as long as you keep the noise down as the host requested.)
https://www.airbnb.com/rooms/9815599


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– House with a Pool on the Mekong / Laos –

The French-Laos colonial house offers a beautiful view of the serene Mekong River and the smaller Nam Dong River. The design is simple yet elegant. It features three large bedrooms with en-suite baths, a living room and terraces. Its private infinity pool parallel to the Mekong River is a nice spot to watch the sunrise and sunset with Mekong as a background.
https://www.airbnb.com/rooms/3939934


 

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– Kiridara Villa Ban Visoun / Laos –

The lovely villa is a part of Kiridara Hotel in Luang Prabang, which ensures you a superior hospitality. The 2-bedroom villa is of contemporary Lao style. With historical sites and a local village nearby, guests have a chance to experience the authentic local way of life.
https://www.airbnb.com/rooms/6941851



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– Studio P I L A; Loft, Comfy Designer’s Home / Thailand –

This loft townhouse in Bangkok also doubles as a studio of a fashion designer. So, a pleasant stay with a trendy and chic host is guaranteed. The hose offers a second floor on the 4-storey building for guests, while the first floor is a reception area and the designer himself lives on the third floor.
https://www.airbnb.com/rooms/16156713


 

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– The Mustang Nero / Room No.4 the Horse / Thailand –

This could be one of the most exotic rooms to stay in Bangkok. The building itself is a renovated shop-house. The host cleverly turned The Horse room into a raw, rustic accommodation with a big tree in the middle of it, vintage furnishings and artsy taxidermies. It may not suit guests with fainted hearts, but it is surely impressive.
https://www.airbnb.com/rooms/5964843?s=AP3-gjiJ


 

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– The Naked House / Thailand –

The stilt-floor plan house on Samui Island takes advantage of the location for a full panoramic ocean view and fresh natural air. The house takes up to 11 people and also has a saltwater lap pool surrounded by nature. According to a guest’s comment, the real building looks even better than the photos. To prove the statement, book the place and see it for yourself.
https://www.airbnb.com/rooms/3251026?s=u5f8pJAd


 

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– Tropical Paradise Tree House – Famous Homestay / Vietnam –

Supported by only one pillar, just like the historical One Pillar Pagoda, this unique homestay in Hanoi is a tree house where you can actually sleep in. The house is elevated 4 meters from the ground. Contrary to its out worldly tribal-like decoration, the place is equipped with wi-fi and air-conditioning machine for guests’ convenience.
https://www.airbnb.com/rooms/13470326?s=0AaPdxBC


 

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– Charming Villa in Hoi An / Vietnam –

Travel back in time through a stay in this ancient house. The traditional Chinese-influenced wooden house features two spacious bedrooms with en-suite bathroom, one master bedroom, one living room and a swimming pool. With an open-air layout, guests stay close to nature the same way people do in the old days.
https://www.airbnb.com/rooms/1194406?s=RPHQC3ui

 

 

the play: space drawing By Paramodel

the play: space drawing By Paramodel

the play: space drawing By Paramodel /// A Site-Specific Exhibition /// Thong Lor Art Space

/// Thailand ///
Story: Bundaree D. /// Information: The Japan Foundation, Bangkok

/// Photos:Paramodel, Nattapoom Pongyen

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001 paramodelic – graffiti 2012 Tokyo Station Gallery [ Tokyo ] ©paramodel / photo: paramodel
An art exhibition of a unique kind is going on right now from November 26 to December 25 at the Thong Lor Art Space (open everyday from 2pm.-9pm. except Tuesdays and Wednesdays). Organized by The Japan Foundation, Bangkok and Thong Lor Art Space. the site-specific art show will set your imagination on fire.

On view are bewitchingly beautiful works of art by a duo of Japanese artists, known as Paramodel. Showing a slice of their imaginative paradise, the pair plays with their artistic media in a way so fascinating that it is a class of its own. Based on a site-specific concept, the exhibition is so rare it seems paradoxical in the eye of the world.

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002 How to make a paramodel. 2012 APT7 Queensland Art Gallery / Gallery of Modern Art [ Brisbane / Australia ] ©paramodel / photo: paramodel
Paramodel has won critical acclaim regionally and internationally. The duo is putting their works of art on display for the first time in Thailand this year. Their works encompass a variety of genres, from photography to sculptures to paintings to videos, most of which involve large-scale installations and unique space utilizations, hence the term site-specific. The duo’s artistic works are known for depicting scenes and various polarities that exist in everyday life. Their signature lies in using familiar media, which they call “toys,” to communicate ideas through artistic compositions. The materials include blue plastic pipes, miniature vehicles, plastic models, and motifs. With these objects and decorative hacks, they create blueprints of paradise whilst underscoring life’s paradoxes. Some of their creations come in three-dimensional graffiti, diorama, drawing, mural, and landscape.

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One of the Paramodel duo, Yasuhiko Hayashi will stay in Bangkok for a month, during which he will demonstrate the three-dimensional space concept at the Thonglor Art Space using ordinary media, such as industrial pipes and “Plarails” or pieces of plastic railing.

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Their signature materials; namely, pipes and plarails, are intended to create visual impacts, the first thing we look toward in any kind of artistic compositions. For some, Paramodel’s work may look like a construction site. For others, it may symbolize scenes of a paradoxical paradise, or visualizations of our complex social behaviors and relationships with one another. Some may find it interesting in the lead-up to for the Holiday Season. In the shortest word possible, it’s time you set your imagination free. Mark your calendar!

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For more information: https://www.facebook.com/events/1708509662800769/permalink/1717320201919715/

https://www.facebook.com/jfbangkok/

https://www.facebook.com/Thonglorartspace/

“Silver Fermentation” and “Glided Blue”:  Dual Art Exhibitions by Landry Dunand

“Silver Fermentation” and “Glided Blue”: Dual Art Exhibitions by Landry Dunand

Landry Dunand is a French photographer, who has come to call Thailand home. Having traveled extensively, from France to Afghanistan to Thailand, he captured moments of people’s lives and local cultures through his film cameras. Dunand will be sharing his years of experience in two concurrent art exhibitions, which art lovers shouldn’t miss.

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The dual art exhibitions, “Silver Fermentation” and “Glided Blue,” will be held at the Neilson Hays library throughout this December. Interestingly, both of them are in monochromic tones.

“Glided Blue” is a collection of cyanotypes. The cyan blue photos are produced by placing a negative or an object directly on a coated paper, and let the sunlight through. The traditional photographic process can be dated back to the 18th century.

“Silver Fermentation” is a series of silver gelatin prints. Dunand developed all the photos himself in his home darkroom.

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For Dunand, his main inspirations are people, the nature and its constant changing conditions. His photos are mostly of people in Thai local villages and their natural surroundings. “All of the works presented here are heavily influenced by my environment. I live in a village, where nature is extremely present. I can feel and see nature growing and dying around me. The weather and time makes it constantly evolve. So I get a lot of inspirations from nature and local life.”

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“People are still living in nature here. Most of the aunties around me are cultivating their yards for daily needs. Every morning you can see people picking up Dok Anchan (butterfly peas), collecting coconut for the milk and meat, fishing for dinner, and growing various vegetables. I like the self-sustaining life, where what is around is enough to live. People can live much simpler, more peaceful life when they are not distracted by consumerist environments.”

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The outcomes of interesting topics and unusual techniques culminated in these wonderful monochromic photos, which art lovers shouldn’t miss.

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The In-Between Arts Festival 2016

The In-Between Arts Festival 2016

The In-Between Arts Festival 2016 is being held at the Hin Bus Depot Art Center, A heritage building in Penang from November 26 to 30, 2016

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Information : http://www.hinbusdepot.com

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#HinbetweenAF

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What we eat tells a story not just about us as individuals, but also about the histories that make up our wider culture. Food is thus intimately linked to the arts. The IbAF works in partnership with other organizations in Penang to foster collaborations between artists and food professionals. By approaching food through art, and by highlighting the artistry of food, the IbAF frames itself as stimulating and inspiring: a positive approach that gets people thinking about the role of food in our society and leads to innovative ideas about people’s everyday lifestyle choices.

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photo credit: http://georgetownfestival.com/in-between-arts-festival/

The festival’s location in Penang allows us to take advantage of the island’s resources as a centre of artistic creation as well as its global reputation as a magnet for high-quality food. At its core, this year’s IbAF creates a platform to demonstrate the uniqueness of local food and art through the notion of sustainability. Following the food chain from farm to fork, we address the production, distribution, preparation and consumption of food. In doing so, festival goers come together to support locally harvested food products and culinary traditions, and raise awareness of living healthier lifestyles.

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photo credit: http://www.mypenang.gov.my/itemfull-8093 the_inbetween_arts_festival_2016.pgt

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The IbAF 2016 organizes an enticing program of events, including mouth-watering food presentations, a variety of food and art workshops, a food zine exhibition, a bookstall and more. At the same time, it offers an opportunity to showcase small businesses and artists to help them flourish and reach a wider clientele. The sheer variety of exciting activities will also further enhance the attractiveness of Penang’s food and art culture in the long run.

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Singapore Biennale 2016: An Atlas of Mirrors

Singapore Biennale 2016: An Atlas of Mirrors

How do we view ourselves and the world? This is the question and the core of Singapore Biennale 2016. Through views of 63 selected artists from Southeast Asia, East Asia and South Asia, Singapore Biennale 2016 invites everyone to discover intertwining worlds like you have never seen before.

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Photos: Singapore Art Museum

SAMSUNG CSC

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SAMSUNG CSC

Throughout the period of four months (October 27, 2016 – February 26, 2017), talks, workshops and exhibition are being held at museums and art galleries across Singapore. Following are some of the highlighted works you wouldn’t want to miss.

 

Fantasy map reflects a fraction from Indonesia history. – Treasure Islands by Made Wianda (Indonesia)
Fantasy map reflects a fraction from Indonesia history. – Treasure Islands by Made Wianda (Indonesia)

 

Fantasy, imagination and history cross path in many exhibitions. Made Wianta, an Indonesian artist looks back to the colonial chapter in Indonesia history with buffalo leather maps. The orange-gold color of buffalo leather and glistening mirrors and nails depict abundant Indonesia’s spices and nutmegs during the colonial era.

Inscription of the Island by Lim Soo Ngee (Singapore)
Inscription of the Island by Lim Soo Ngee (Singapore)

 

Lim Soo Ngee creates a Singapore mythical story beyond the history. According to his imaginary myth, a gigantic left hand sculpture once belonged to a statue, which was guiding the way to a ship of civilization. The statue collapsed. Since then, the left hand has been turning into a sundial for Singaporean people.

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Kra-Tua Taeng Seua by Sakarin Krue-On (Thailand)
Kra-Tua Taeng Seua by Sakarin Krue-On (Thailand)

 

Another mythical-themed work is by a Thai artist. Moved by “Kra-Tua Taeng Seua,” Southern Thailand folklore about a tiger hunt, which was once popular but currently could barely survive in a contemporary world, Sakarin Krue-On produced a live performance, a silent film and behind-the-scene documentary.

 

 

 

For Singapore Art Museum

 

These eyes are both beautiful and haunting. – Karagatan by Gregory Halili (The Philippines)
These eyes are both beautiful and haunting. – Karagatan by Gregory Halili (The Philippines)

 

Karagatan (The Breadth of Oceans) is more of a realistic piece. The artwork will look right back at you while you are observing. Eyes of coastal villagers in the Philippines are carved and painted on mother of pearl shells to show their connections to the sea and to pay homage to those whose lives and fates are tied to the ocean.

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The larger-than-life piece of art uses incense sticks to represent different human beings. – Growing by Hemali Bhuta (India)
The larger-than-life piece of art uses incense sticks to represent different human beings. – Growing by Hemali Bhuta (India)

 

Big ideas are also at play here. One example is Hemela Bhuta’s work. From India, Bhuta’s Growing is a large hanging installation piece made mainly from incense sticks of different fragrance. Each stick represents a human being. Each one is different, yet we are facing birth, growth and death just the same. It also reflects the idea of human species as a small part of Nature.

Drop by for a visit at Singapore Biennale 2016, and you will certainly witness novel and thoughtful points of view and maybe develop one of your own.

 

“Enter the Parallel World” by H.H. Lim (Malaysia) comprises two recordings of his performance -- one of his 30-minute-long body balance on a basketball, and the other of his countless failures that led to the success.
“Enter the Parallel World” by H.H. Lim (Malaysia) comprises two recordings of his performance — one of his 30-minute-long body balance on a basketball, and the other of his countless failures that led to the success.

 

One’s reflection is distorted and changeable in this ever-flowing framed petroleum painting. – Good Boy, Bad Boy by Chou Shih Hsiung (Taiwan)
One’s reflection is distorted and changeable in this ever-flowing framed petroleum painting. – Good Boy, Bad Boy by Chou Shih Hsiung (Taiwan)

 

The arrival of the Japanese army in Java is shown through the projection of two images on a fabric screen. – Dollah Jawa by Faizal Hamdan (Brunei)
The arrival of the Japanese army in Java is shown through the projection of two images on a fabric screen. – Dollah Jawa by Faizal Hamdan (Brunei)

 

A night sky in Singapore is precisely recreated in this detailed artwork. – Dust by Ni Youyu (China)
A night sky in Singapore is precisely recreated in this detailed artwork. – Dust by Ni Youyu (China)

 

This spectacular light and sound installation work draws the relationship between humans and the sea. – Endless Hours at Sea by Martha Athienza (The Philippines)
This spectacular light and sound installation work draws the relationship between humans and the sea. – Endless Hours at Sea by Martha Athienza (The Philippines)

 

The idea of heaven and earth blends with the concept of the Armageddon. The artist translates traditional Thai beliefs into modern mural-like works. – Aftermath by Pannaphan Yodmanee (Thailand)
The idea of heaven and earth blends with the concept of the Armageddon. The artist translates traditional Thai beliefs into modern mural-like works. – Aftermath by Pannaphan Yodmanee (Thailand)
Manila FAME 2016

Manila FAME 2016

This year’s Manila FAME Exhibition features objects of handicraft from a regional collaboration project. The landmark event is being held under the theme,
ASEAN Design to the World.

 

/// The Philippines ///

Story: Rush Pleansuk /// Photos: Teerapong Thammacharoen

An amazing rattan chair on the show
An amazing rattan chair on the show
A strikingly beautiful mirror on wooden frame
A strikingly beautiful mirror on wooden frame
A Schema lamp exhibition /A new collection by Kenneth Cobonpue
A Schema lamp exhibition /// A new collection by Kenneth Cobonpue
The “ASEAN Design to the World” exhibition is the product of collaboration among five regional member countries.
The “ASEAN Design to the World” exhibition is the product of collaboration among five regional member countries.

Highlights of the exhibition are beautiful products of collaboration among regional members, such as the Philippines, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand and Vietnam.

Each country has its unique ways of transforming local materials into beautiful works of handicraft. Such are taking place within the ASEAN region, where member countries have come together and integrated their efforts in a project called “Improving the Current Status of ASEAN Master Craft Designers.” They also reached out to collaborate with other experts in the field.

It’s about repurposing. This eye-catching stool made of bamboo basketry is by Phanida Prommetta of the ASEAN Master Craft Program.
It’s about repurposing. This eye-catching stool made of bamboo basketry is by Phanida Prommetta of the ASEAN Master Craft Program.
A metal lampshade from Indonesia is curate by Lim Masulin.
A metal lampshade from Indonesia is curate by Lim Masulin.
Inspired by shadow play, this lampshade from Thailand is designed by Rush Pleansuk of the ASEAN Master Craft Program.
Inspired by shadow play, this lampshade from Thailand is designed by Rush Pleansuk of the ASEAN Master Craft Program.
From Thailand, Teerapong Thammacharoen of the ASEAN Master Craft Program crafted this chandelier out of bamboo basketry.
From Thailand, Teerapong Thammacharoen of the ASEAN Master Craft Program crafted this chandelier out of bamboo basketry.

An eye-catching object of handicraft is the product of collaboration with Peruvian’s designer Nelson Sepulveda. The design is pure and simple with a naive charm. Rough natural textures are preserved. Sepulveda recycles local wastes, i.e. coconut leaves, pineapple-fiber papers and abaca plants. It’s amazing how he develops found materials into furniture that fits in well with contemporary lifestyle and residential spaces.

Inspired by techniques from the shadow play, these leather screens are by Chalan Thawornukulphong from Thailand.
Inspired by techniques from the shadow play, these leather screens are by Chalan Thawornukulphong from Thailand.
Also from Thailand, a red coffee table comes in the form a wild boar’s head, by Sasiwimol Chalearmrith of the ASEAN Master Craft Program.
Also from Thailand, a red coffee table comes in the form a wild boar’s head, by Sasiwimol Chalearmrith of the ASEAN Master Craft Program.
Fashion modern chairs in mock-up settings by Budij Layug
Fashion modern chairs in mock-up settings by Budji Layug
Frontal view of the Citem exhibition by Nelson Sepulveda
Frontal view of the Citem exhibition by Nelson Sepulveda
The Citem exhibition by Nelson Sepulveda
The Citem exhibition by Nelson Sepulveda
Citem exhibition designs by Nelson Sepulveda
Citem exhibition designs by Nelson Sepulveda
Lucent Objects by Stanley Ruiz
Lucent Objects by Stanley Ruiz
Part of the Masa Ecopaper exhibition
Part of the Masa Ecopaper exhibition
The Masa Ecopaper exhibition
The Masa Ecopaper exhibition
The “ASEAN Design to the World” booth features woven fabrics by Awika Samukraman.
The “ASEAN Design to the World” booth features woven fabrics by Awika Samukraman.

This year, Budij Layug has put on another interesting exhibition in the Philippines. His selections and perspectives not only offer home décor items, but also fuse with fashionable influences. Equally intriguing are “Lucent Objects,” a design exhibition by the Design Center of the Philippines in association with Stanley Ruiz. Here lampshades are produced from different natural materials. A lovely touch of creativity comes in the form of a lampshade made of fiber from the coconut shell. The ingenious design aims to reduce adverse effects on the environment. In the process, toxic chemicals are avoided as best as possible.

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The Peacock Chair Redux exhibition
The Peacock Chair Redux exhibition

Meantime, the Peacock Chair Redux Exhibition gives a new meaning to the iconic chair. Philippine designers develop these innovative designs based on the original Peacock Chair using a variety of techniques and materials.

Thailand BIG+BIH 2016 / Bangkok International Gift Fair and Bangkok International Houseware

Thailand BIG+BIH 2016 / Bangkok International Gift Fair and Bangkok International Houseware

 Thailand BIG+BIH 2016 / Bangkok International Gift Fair and Bangkok International Houseware

/// Thailand ///

Story: Bundaree Deewong /// Photo: Bundaree Deewong, Sungwan Phratem

ASEAN’s International trade fair for trendy gift and lifestyle products took place from April 19th to 23rd, 2016 (trade Days the 19th to 21st, public days the 22nd and 23rd) at Bangkok International Trade & Exhibition Centre (BITEC), Bangna, Bangkok, Thailand.

This was the 41st edition of BIG+BIH, and it was organized under the concept “ASEAN Life+Style.” In the attractive “Fresh Taiwan,” “design lifestyle” products from Taiwanese designers were shown; “DEmark Award showcase” put on display well-designed Thai products now on the international market that had won Design Excellence prizes, and “SACICT Art & Craft” exhibited Thai folk arts and crafts products representing “Thainess” from local design traditions. The fair also featured product exhibits that provided an excellent platform for Thai designers and new entrepreneurs to show their latest collections.

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Dhanabadee, the famous ceramic shop from Lampang, Thailand
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Fresh Taiwan exhibition : design lifestyle products from Taiwanese designers
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Isan Collection : the project of the northeast design in Thailand
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Oggi, wooden furniture brand in Scandinavian accent

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Showcases at the fair were set out in 3 zones: BIG, BIG Design, and BIH. The most popular products of the fair were gifts and handicraft decorative items, household products, pet products and services.

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About home, modern wooden furniture and lamp in sophisticated style
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Unique design lamp made of veneer wood
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Hari Ora, wooden furniture shop
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Qualy, plastic objects in design
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Idealize shop, furniture that made of natural materials such as scrap wood and old tree stumps.
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Tin Home Toy, lifestyle products which made of galvanize sheets
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L-Living, decoration items for holiday homes

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Joar, unique stone lamps
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Baanchaan, Asian style hanging lamp
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C-Ssence, Bananamache product
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Klaps Design, modern furniture brand

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link: http://oct2016.bigandbih.com/

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