Blog : HOUSES

A Steel Frame Waterfront House That Blends Modernity with Context

A Steel Frame Waterfront House That Blends Modernity with Context

This home rises above a tall tai thun open space perfect for socializing, especially for large family gatherings. And it has some surprises inside.

/// THAILAND ///
Story: Samutcha Viraporn /// Photography: Sitthisak Namkham /// Design: Volume Matrix Studio 

There was already a residence built here, but it wasn’t designed with the evolving needs of such a big family in mind, so a new space was created, a new waterfront home where everyone could come together and guests could spend the night.

Steel HouseSteel House

 The steel used for columns, beams, stairs, and balconies is surplus material  from a large construction business belonging to the owner himself. “I had to scale the entire house to fit all that material,” said architect Kasin Sonsri, of Volume Matrix Studio as he spoke about the design challenges.

    Steel HouseSteel House Steel House Steel House

This Ayutthaya home is put together to give the feel of a traditional Thai house, with its high tai thun to use as a multi-purpose courtyard, broad eaves reaching out, living area open and inviting to the outside breeze, house raised up to catch views of the river and the garden below. There’s a wide porch, an add-on extending out from the big house. Massive posts and beams are designed to showcase their structural utility as a part of the house, as do the steps up into the dining room, the walkways, the outside porch, and the rain gutters spilling water through a steel grate. All these elements combine to give a unique contemporary look to this house of steel and wood. The interior décor is simple. The second floor features an “open plan” separation of usable space: walls open up, reaching through from the kitchen into a large dining nook and from there into the living room area.

    Steel House Steel House Steel House Steel House

Step up onto the third floor, and surprise! The décor completely changes and it’s as if you’ve suddenly dropped into a Japanese home, where the style of mats, windows, and doors all tell you why the owner named the house “Sala Zen.” In this room is a built-in cabinet where bedding is stored so that guests can easily come spend the night. Outside is a roof deck garden highlighted by an Onsen hot tub in an outdoor private spot that can’t be seen from the garden below.

Steel House Steel House Steel House Steel House

This home is composed of many elements, but they all blend to make this a truly Thai residence, a steel-framed waterfront house that’s warm and familial, fits perfectly into its context, and offers the experience of comfortable living with natural light and breezes and great views all around, on this small Ko Rian soi in Ayutthaya Province.

Steel House

Link: http://www.baanlaesuan.com/96717/houses/riverside-relaxation/2/

Single-Storey House on a Foundation of Simplicity

Single-Storey House on a Foundation of Simplicity

Right in the middle of a field in Ang Thong Province stands a single-storey house that has become a community point of interest, built with his own cash by a 73-year-old youngster.

/// THAILAND ///
Story: Patsiri Chot /// Photography: Soopakorn Srisakul /// Design: Teerachai Leesuraplanon /// Style: Somboon Kringkrai

Owner Chamnan Chatchawalyangkul says, “At my age, I really needed to make this happen while I was still strong enough to get around. I don’t want to be a burden on my kids when I’m not so capable anymore, living in a cramped room with them worrying about me all the time. I needed to plan in advance to have a house where I can take care of myself. And the house will eventually belong to the kids anyhow.” 

Single-Storey House / Teerachai LeesuraplanonSingle-Storey House / Teerachai Leesuraplanon Single-Storey House / Teerachai Leesuraplanon Single-Storey House / Teerachai Leesuraplanon

Chamnan’s design is spare and open, with excellent ventilation. With everything on the same level, each room is accessible by wheelchair. One special place is a karaoke room for him and his friends. Architect Jim (Teerachai) Leesuraplanon tells us, “Chamnan said he’d always lived in a rowhouse, a limited, safe space. Some people might want a house in the middle of an open lot to be open all around, but I think about safety, too. This is why we put the brick wall in front, and the iron bars, barriers that still allow light and air to pass through. I’d summarize the design I had in mind with the three words ‘balance,’ ‘blend,’ and ‘believe,’ expressing a balanced life, cause and effect, and faith.”

Single-Storey House / Teerachai LeesuraplanonSingle-Storey House / Teerachai LeesuraplanonSingle-Storey House / Teerachai Leesuraplanon
Standing in a rural field with a road in front, the house opens out on a rubber tree orchard in the rear. Simplicity is the foundation of the design: a balance between vertical and horizontal lines and surfaces, no nooks or ridges to collect dust, and elemental materials such as concrete, wood, metal, brick, and gravel. A metal frame lifts the roof at an angle to break the force of the wind. The floor is raised above the ground, facilitating maintenance work on utility systems beneath. The front wall is a striking display of BPK brick, a local Ang Thong material, laid in a unique arrangement to create beautiful patterns of light and shade, with an additional layer of sliding glass windows for safety. Around the house is laid a path of river gravel, so someone in the house can easily hear a person walking outside.

Single-Storey House / Teerachai LeesuraplanonSingle-Storey House / Teerachai Leesuraplanon Single-Storey House / Teerachai Leesuraplanon

The big central living room is a great place to relax, but the real heart of the house is the big porch. When the folding doors are opened, the room opens up, and it’s much like an old-time Thai house, with the added benefit of a great view of the gorgeous rubber forest, just as the original design envisioned.

Single-Storey House / Teerachai LeesuraplanonSingle-Storey House / Teerachai Leesuraplanon

Link: www.baanlaesuan.com/112376/houses/balance-blend-believe/

Renovating an Old Bedroom to be a Bridal Home

Renovating an Old Bedroom to be a Bridal Home

These rooms are like a house within a house: they were once just a 90-square-meter bedroom on the second floor.

/// THAILAND ///
Story: Nawapat Dusdul /// Photography: Nantiya Busabong /// Design: Fatt! Studio
 

Starting life as a married couple, lovebirds Sitthidej Chirapanda and Nicha Pongstaporn took on the challenge of renovating Sitthidej’s sister’s old bedroom. After dividing a second-floor usable space of 70 square meters into living room and bedroom, they added in the 20-square-meter octagonal loft to create an art gallery.

Architects from Fatt! Studio took on the job, and kept the original structure almost intact, but did save space by changing the floating staircase from its original design to a helical (spiral) one, adding an implicit eye-catching point of interest to the space. This required careful measurement to get the proportions right, so tall people wouldn’t hit the ceiling going up. Here, too, the meticulous, painstaking work of master craftsmen was employed in creating a finely detailed brick wall. After a first coat of plain white paint they daubed, trimmed, and polished the bricks in different spots piece by piece to create the sort of unique patterning the residents were looking for.

The architects retained the original makha wood floor, carefully abrading the wood to soften it, then surfacing it with a round of oil-based finisher. It was decided to completely remove the original living room ceiling so as to open the space up much more. A ceiling-specific demolition method was used, enabling display of the bare surface of the red wood above, which was polished, softening colors until the unique grains of each panel showed clearly.

In the octagonal gallery the original window was replaced with a one set with square panes painted white, offsetting the black-paned sliding steel door between living room and bedroom. The division of the main floor is quite noticeable, as the colors split it off into two sections:  the living room is mainly white, while the bedroom is defined by darker, more austere tones, giving it a quieter, more restful mood.


Even on a day when the weather is not all that favorable, the overcast, sunless firmament shading the wall surfaces, the room we’re standing in exudes warmth of other kinds: it’s warm in color and style, and warmed by the smiles of this lovable couple who get to live on and on within this private space they themselves once called the stuff of dreams.

Link : www.facebook.com/fattstudioarchitect/

Peaceful, Shady Northeastern Thai House

Peaceful, Shady Northeastern Thai House

Out of the edge of a sun hemp field rises what looks to be a traditional huean isaan (Northeastern Thai house). But this home, set in a shady, woodsy atmosphere, fragrant with the aromas of a Thai house and the fun-filled rhythms of Thai family ways, is fully adapted to contemporary ways of life.

/// THAILAND ///
Story: Wuthikorn Suthiapa /// Photography: Soopakorn Srisakul /// Style: Wanas Thira /// Design: Arsomsilp Community and Environmental Architects

 
After Sakda and Orapin Sreesangkom had lived 20 years in a condo, they designed this eco-friendly house to find an adaptation of Thai family life that could suit the modern age, and to build environmental awareness in themselves and their children.



The ground floor design echoes the traditional tai thun lower space found beneath Thai houses. A porch reaches outwards to fill the usual roles: entertaining guests, socializing. Up close you’ll see it’s more like 3 houses connected by one deck, each one with wide eaves blocking sun and rain, but with a twist: the underside insulation is “rammed earth,” La Terre’s innovative cooling solution that rapidly absorbs and diffuses heat and is made from organic, renewable materials. Sakda and designers Arsomsilp Community and Environmental Architects shared the same vision.

The huean isaan takes over in spirit, though, with its outward image evoking a cultural memory reflected in the playfulness of the three boys, Chris, Gav, and Guy, bringing cheer to every corner of the house: playing in the attic, sliding down polished planks beside the stairway, and everyone’s favorite: the sky deck, accessible from anywhere in the house.

 
The heart of the home is the living room: it’s spacious, with bar counter, dining area, and sofas for relaxing, sized 7 X 11 meters, and with no support pillars blocking the view within. It was designed to mirror the look and function of the tai thun, a space that brings everyone together to do whatever they like to do best, as individuals or a group.

The building foundation supports a raised deck all around the house. This keeps slithering things and garden creepy-crawlies from coming into the house, at the same time creating good ventilation below. The extra area for sitting, stretching the legs, or walking out into the garden is one more bonus.

Sakda’s deep attachment to the traditional huean isaan it what brought this all about. That, and the family’s courage in leaving the convenience of condo life behind them to design, build and live in a completely different way, growing their own garden, and creating a new home that could be passed down to the next generations.

Sun hemp is grown for soil maintenance

Link: Arsomsilp Community and Environmental Architects

Modern House amid a Country Atmosphere

Modern House amid a Country Atmosphere

This one-storey wooden house is designed to bring the best of the old Northeast Thailand lifestyle into the modern age. Strikingly contemporary with its high-gabled roofs, it features a spacious adaptation of the traditional Thai house verandah where relatives and neighbors can come together, hang out, and shoot the breeze. 

 /// THAILAND ///
Story: Ektida N. /// Photography:  Soopakorn Srisakul
 

In the peaceful countryside atmosphere of Si Chompu District in Khon Kaen Province, Wathinee Sudta calls her family’s wooden house “Baan Boon Home.” The English word “home” in Northeast dialect means “get together,” so combined with the word “boon” (merit) the name comes out as “get-together make-merit house.”

wooden house

Originally, Wathinee wanted the designers of S Pace Studio simply to renovate the old 2-storey house. whose bottom level had cement flooring, with the upstairs all wood. After a full assessment of materials and building frame, though, it became clear that a completely new house was the way to go.

The first step was to raise the foundation above road level with landfill, to reduce the risk of flooding. Eventually they took advantage of the large property size to bring all the functionality of the former two storeys into a thoroughly modern single-level house with the added bonus of not requiring an aging grandma to climb stairs anymore.

wooden house

wooden house

Baan Boon Home has a floor space of 190 square meters, with enough functionality to completely meet the needs of the fivefamily members. The rear section of the house has a high-gabled roof which overlaps the lower-gabled front, where the corrugated roofing is translucent, allowing natural daylight to shine in, an especially effective way to keep the 9-meter-deep verandah light and cheerful.

Another unique feature is the placement of the kitchen at the front of the house, with the thought that family members will tend to enjoy most sit-down meals together on the verandah. The kitchen is fully enclosed, and the walls have grooves etched and painted to resemble wood grain, all giving a clean, proportionate look to a highly practical design.

wooden house

The wood used to build the house is mostly – 90% or more – real wood taken from the old house. This saved on the budget, and only the high-quality, strong wood was used, but the marks on its surface speak of character, faithful service over time, and add charm, keeping lifetimes of family memories alive and shining into modern times.

Link : www.baanlaesuan.com/99541/design/living/homeboon/

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Modern House with a Thai Flavor 
Modern House with a Thai Flavor

Modern House with a Thai Flavor

A large intergenerational family calls this house home. With family members from 8 to 84 years old, what stories it tells! Here belongings passed down across nearly a century give a sense of “Thainess” to every corner of its modern design.

 /// Thailand ///
Story: Samutcha Viraporn /// Photo:  Sitthisak Namkham, NantiyaBusabong

Modern House
Patama (second from the right) and her family

 Long-time community worker Patama Roonrakwit, Case Studio architect who designed and owns the house, created it from her knowledge of the ways and tastes of all its residents in their old home. In a unique adaptation and fundamental design difference here, she preserved an old wooden house Pong’s grandfather had built, hiring Chinese craftsmen to raise it up to the second floor of the central building so family members could continue to experience its warmth. Besides this, the home contains the offices of Case Studio Architecture, Ed The Builder Contracting, her brother’s tour company, sister’s music school, and guest rooms where friends can stay.

All this had to fit in a space of 1 rai (.4 acre), a narrow, long north-to-south lot.  The building divides into seven sections, some of which are open, verandah-like corridors that give an angular definition to the space, trapping the wind and making for good air circulation throughout.

Modern House
Wooden slats guard against sun and wind and create visual harmony.    
Modern House
The lower floor is a multipurpose area, adapting the Thai traditional “tai thun” space below a house to fit modern lifestyles.
Modern House
A nearly hundred-year-old wooden house is set as the very center of the main home, and contains a shrine holding Buddha images.
Vietnam Traditional Brick House

Vietnam Traditional Brick House

Vietnamese architecture studio, Tropical Space, has designed a new modern tropical house, made from brick and concrete in Vietnam’s Long An province. Inspired by the Vietnam traditional structure, the bare brick house is located on a land parcel of 750 square meters, accompanied by 3 separate spaces and slope roof while using a modern and strong architectural language.

/// Vietnam ///
Story: Nawapat, Nipapat Dusdul /// Photography: Oki Hiroyuki /// Design: Tropical Space

Vietnam Traditional Brick House

The thing that never changes is that most Tropical Space’s design works make use of bricks partly because they are inherently Vietnamese material and indigenous to the area. At the same time, with a deep understanding of Vietnamese culture and climate, they are committed to the use of environment-friendly building practices and sustainable material selection.   

Vietnam Traditional Brick House

Vietnam Traditional Brick House

Vietnam Traditional Brick House

The Long An House has designed for hot and humid climate and is maximizing the ventilation efficiency by dividing the roof into two parts and having a court yard; then allocating two corridors to connecting the roof. This way has created a court yard and big walls. These porous walls can allow breeze to flow through the house.

Vietnam Traditional Brick House

Vietnam Traditional Brick House

Vietnam Traditional Brick House

The Vietnam traditional house is stretched from front to back creating continuous functional spaces. These spaces’ boundaries are estimated by light with different intensity and darkness. With this layout, the wind can flow through the house in every season.  

Vietnam Traditional Brick House

The front yard of the house is made by the hollow clay which can absorb the rain and cool down the floor in summer heat. Next to the yard is a buffer space which created the light transition from the yard to the living room, dining room and bedroom.

The kitchen area, located in the north side along with functional spaces, is suitable for traditional cooking and spending precious time with family.

The mezzanine accommodates with two bedrooms. All spaces between relaxing area, reading area and a long corridor are connected, having two stairs on both ends because the design team wants to have a continuous space between the functional areas inside and outside the house, so that the children can play and move freely, throughout the house without being confined by separate walls.

Vietnam Traditional Brick House

Vietnam Traditional Brick House

 

Link: khonggiannhietdoi.com

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The Perfect Size Townhouse

The Perfect Size Townhouse

The townhouse is a common type of building in Thailand, especially in Bangkok. Home owner and architect Narong Othavorn grew up in one, always thinking of ways it could be better designed. Eventually he and his wife Pim Achariyasilpa decided to create their own home by renovating a 30-year-old townhouse in the Si Phraya neighborhood.

/// THAILAND ///
Story: Wuthikorn Suthiapa /// Photography: Soopakorn Srisakul 


The building combines two adjacent townhouses into one. Narong kept the original wrought-metal façade, modifying the original metal entrance door with a mixed frame of wood and steel, leaving the next-door side the entrance to a fourth-floor warehouse. A picture window in the living room brings in natural light onto washed gravel walls that lead down to a small garden behind the house,  inspiration for the “doublespace” mezzanine.


The doublespace ceiling isn’t only about making the lower level look good: it supports the open plan design. Glass panels in the dining nook of the mezzanine above extend a feeling of comfort to every space in the house. From the mezzanine there’s a continuous view through glass partitions out to the garden behind the house, and there’s steady circulation of air from front to back. Townhouses are apt to feel cramped, but not this one! The light is different in each area, but light is what connects everything.

“These things came from our own personal tastes. Pim likes well-lit spaces. Me, I like indirect light. So with a house for the two of us we had to get the division of space just right, using the light available in each area. The lower floor is bathed in a subdued natural light; upstairs the living room brightly lit through the front window. Moving back to the dining area and bar, the light is dimmer. Go upstairs to the bathroom and dressing areas and it’s lighter again, suiting the specific limitations and characteristics of each space.”

“Small, but spacious” is how both owners refer to this house: better than adequate, the size is really perfect. Not so small as to be cramped. Everywhere some things catch your eyes up close and others at a distance. The home offers a master class on how townhouse renovation can work with limited areas to create special, interesting spaces. Even though adjoining buildings make side windows impossible, careful arrangement of space and windows in higher levels give this house a beauty that is anything but ordinary.

Link : www.facebook.com/situ.based

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Compact House in a Rubber Forest

Compact House in a Rubber Forest

 The tree-filled beauty of the great outdoors makes for a relaxing place to live, which is why so many want this. Among these is the Norateedilok family, who made the dream a reality with this single-story modern-style house in a verdant forest of rubber trees.

/// THAILAND ///
Story: Ajchara Jeen., Trairat Songpao /// Photography:  Tanakitt Khum-on

Architect/Owner Nat (Rakchai Norateedilok) built this house for his mother, who wanted to be near her grandparents in Phatthalung Province. Here is a place near the rubber orchards she loves which she can call home and where she can socialize with friends of her generation. 

Compact House in a Rubber Forest
Nat with his older brother (right)


“There used to be a rice storehouse here,” said Nat. “The rubber orchard was planted later, and the trees had grown big and beautiful, so we decided to build the house here. Also, the front area is near the original main house kitchen, so there was no need to build a new kitchen. Stucco walls and a slanted black steel roof give it a smooth, simple look. The house’s 43 square meters hold a bedroom, bathroom, and living room.

“This house is on a ‘footing-style’ foundation. I put free-standing, unattached posts in the earth before adding floor beams and posts; this helps create good air flow. I pretty much left the interior planning to Mom’s preferences, so the design is for simplicity and ease of use.”

Steel House in a Rubber Forest
The many openings around the house open great views and bring in light all day long: high doors, glass-covered open spaces below the roof, and wide windows along walls.
The raised floor allows air flow below, guards against problems of ground moisture, and prevents unwanted bugs and animals from entering the house.

The location, in a rubber plantation, made choice of construction materials an important consideration. Nat primarily used concrete and real wood to give the house a look to match the surrounding environment. Synthetic wood was used where necessary, which also helped with the budget. Construction was done by local builders in only 4-5 months, so Nat was able to supervise the work himself and ensure the budget not exceed 700,000 baht.

Steel House in a Rubber Forest

Steel House in a Rubber Forest

Nat’s mother was in charge of the interior décor. In selecting furniture she kept the number of pieces to a minimum, just what was necessary to be able to relax in a clean, orderly place and feel close to nature. The resulting house is wonderfully livable and comfortable.

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ReGEN House: Modern Home, Thai Concept, Great for Family Members of All Ages

ReGEN House: Modern Home, Thai Concept, Great for Family Members of All Ages

“ReGEN House,” Pankwan Hudthagosol’s home, was designed as a modern residence for a multigenerational family. Built on the same property as his father’s house, its concept echoes his father’s belief that the gift of warmth and closeness can show us how to think and live, and both welcomes and provides a foundation in life for young Mena, the newest family member. It began with a great design from EKAR Architects.

/// THAILAND ///
Story: foryeah! /// Photography:  Chalermwat Wongchompoo /// 
Owner: Pankwan Hudthagosol  /// Architect: EKAR /// Interior Architect: Define Studio  /// Landscape Architect: Grounds play Studio  /// Structural Engineer: Sommuek Apiraksa

Modern Home ReGEN House Ekar Architects
The four-storey building on about ¼ acre of land has an interior space of 1600 meters. Its L-shaped layout opens on a green courtyard facing the forest-like garden at “Grandpa’s” house, connecting views for the people of three generations.

Modern Home ReGEN House Ekar Architects Modern Home ReGEN House Ekar ArchitectsModern Home ReGEN House Ekar Architects

The first floor holds a carport, maid’s bedroom, and rooms for swimming pool equipment and other services. The heart of the house is the second storey, where a wide balcony/deck taking up a full half of the floor space is used for family recreational activities. This floor is designed to give the sense of being at ground level, as it reaches out to a “green roof” planted with ground cover seemingly floating atop a gazebo rising from the garden below, and with a swimming pool right there giving the feeling of an old-time streamside home.

Modern Home ReGEN House Ekar Architects Modern Home ReGEN House Ekar Architects

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