Singapore Biennale 2016: An Atlas of Mirrors

Singapore Biennale 2016: An Atlas of Mirrors

Singapore Biennale 2016: An Atlas of Mirrors

How do we view ourselves and the world? This is the question and the core of Singapore Biennale 2016. Through views of 63 selected artists from Southeast Asia, East Asia and South Asia, Singapore Biennale 2016 invites everyone to discover intertwining worlds like you have never seen before.

/// Singapore ///

Photos: Singapore Art Museum

SAMSUNG CSC

general02

SAMSUNG CSC

Throughout the period of four months (October 27, 2016 – February 26, 2017), talks, workshops and exhibition are being held at museums and art galleries across Singapore. Following are some of the highlighted works you wouldn’t want to miss.

 

Fantasy map reflects a fraction from Indonesia history. – Treasure Islands by Made Wianda (Indonesia)
Fantasy map reflects a fraction from Indonesia history. – Treasure Islands by Made Wianda (Indonesia)

 

Fantasy, imagination and history cross path in many exhibitions. Made Wianta, an Indonesian artist looks back to the colonial chapter in Indonesia history with buffalo leather maps. The orange-gold color of buffalo leather and glistening mirrors and nails depict abundant Indonesia’s spices and nutmegs during the colonial era.

Inscription of the Island by Lim Soo Ngee (Singapore)
Inscription of the Island by Lim Soo Ngee (Singapore)

 

Lim Soo Ngee creates a Singapore mythical story beyond the history. According to his imaginary myth, a gigantic left hand sculpture once belonged to a statue, which was guiding the way to a ship of civilization. The statue collapsed. Since then, the left hand has been turning into a sundial for Singaporean people.

sakarin1

Kra-Tua Taeng Seua by Sakarin Krue-On (Thailand)
Kra-Tua Taeng Seua by Sakarin Krue-On (Thailand)

 

Another mythical-themed work is by a Thai artist. Moved by “Kra-Tua Taeng Seua,” Southern Thailand folklore about a tiger hunt, which was once popular but currently could barely survive in a contemporary world, Sakarin Krue-On produced a live performance, a silent film and behind-the-scene documentary.

 

 

 

For Singapore Art Museum

 

These eyes are both beautiful and haunting. – Karagatan by Gregory Halili (The Philippines)
These eyes are both beautiful and haunting. – Karagatan by Gregory Halili (The Philippines)

 

Karagatan (The Breadth of Oceans) is more of a realistic piece. The artwork will look right back at you while you are observing. Eyes of coastal villagers in the Philippines are carved and painted on mother of pearl shells to show their connections to the sea and to pay homage to those whose lives and fates are tied to the ocean.

hemali-bhuta1

The larger-than-life piece of art uses incense sticks to represent different human beings. – Growing by Hemali Bhuta (India)
The larger-than-life piece of art uses incense sticks to represent different human beings. – Growing by Hemali Bhuta (India)

 

Big ideas are also at play here. One example is Hemela Bhuta’s work. From India, Bhuta’s Growing is a large hanging installation piece made mainly from incense sticks of different fragrance. Each stick represents a human being. Each one is different, yet we are facing birth, growth and death just the same. It also reflects the idea of human species as a small part of Nature.

Drop by for a visit at Singapore Biennale 2016, and you will certainly witness novel and thoughtful points of view and maybe develop one of your own.

 

“Enter the Parallel World” by H.H. Lim (Malaysia) comprises two recordings of his performance -- one of his 30-minute-long body balance on a basketball, and the other of his countless failures that led to the success.
“Enter the Parallel World” by H.H. Lim (Malaysia) comprises two recordings of his performance — one of his 30-minute-long body balance on a basketball, and the other of his countless failures that led to the success.

 

One’s reflection is distorted and changeable in this ever-flowing framed petroleum painting. – Good Boy, Bad Boy by Chou Shih Hsiung (Taiwan)
One’s reflection is distorted and changeable in this ever-flowing framed petroleum painting. – Good Boy, Bad Boy by Chou Shih Hsiung (Taiwan)

 

The arrival of the Japanese army in Java is shown through the projection of two images on a fabric screen. – Dollah Jawa by Faizal Hamdan (Brunei)
The arrival of the Japanese army in Java is shown through the projection of two images on a fabric screen. – Dollah Jawa by Faizal Hamdan (Brunei)

 

A night sky in Singapore is precisely recreated in this detailed artwork. – Dust by Ni Youyu (China)
A night sky in Singapore is precisely recreated in this detailed artwork. – Dust by Ni Youyu (China)

 

This spectacular light and sound installation work draws the relationship between humans and the sea. – Endless Hours at Sea by Martha Athienza (The Philippines)
This spectacular light and sound installation work draws the relationship between humans and the sea. – Endless Hours at Sea by Martha Athienza (The Philippines)

 

The idea of heaven and earth blends with the concept of the Armageddon. The artist translates traditional Thai beliefs into modern mural-like works. – Aftermath by Pannaphan Yodmanee (Thailand)
The idea of heaven and earth blends with the concept of the Armageddon. The artist translates traditional Thai beliefs into modern mural-like works. – Aftermath by Pannaphan Yodmanee (Thailand)

About the Author

X