Blog : steel house

Local, with a Modern Flavor

Local, with a Modern Flavor

This steel-frame Thai house, a vacation home with a tai thun (open space below), is pared down to modern-style essentials and incorporates elements of a Buddhist temple. Natural ventilation is good enough that it doesn’t need to rely on air conditioning.

/// THAILAND ///
Story: Samutcha Viraporn /// Photography: Soopakorn Srisakul /// Design: PO-D Architects

Regarding “Baan Loy Lom,” as the home is known, a PO-D Company architect said, “This house in the Baan Rai Thaw Si Project presented the challenge of creating a restful getaway for meditation practice on holidays, eliminating all nonessentials. The house’s owner didn’t want to come here and have it be like everywhere else, but rather to have a temple mood, with a monks’ hall, a place to invite dear friends to come sit in a meditation circle and practice dharma.” There were two more challenges. First, the owner was partial to Thai houses, but wanted this one to have a steel frame. One reason for that was that the house had connections to the steel industry, and another was a village conservationist regulation forbidding use of land fill above a certain height.

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Design began with the steel frame and then added features that give the house truly Thai characteristics. A high tai thun open lower space was added, with display columns independent of the house frame. Usable space is separated into blocks connected by open areas. The roof’s partially gabled section connects with a single-sheet roof. Other signature additions include open panels, latticework, openings for light, and folding doors, all elements of traditional Thai houses, but arranged differently here.

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The “monks’ hall” takes central importance, so by design it is visible from every room. For privacy’s sake, though, it can’t be seen from the street. The walkway has a bent axis to give desired angles of view. Brick walls are of Lampang clay, with a lighter shade and more relaxing to the eyes than brick from elsewhere. Apertures inspired by the shape of a temple are cut into walls, but these are of varying sizes and arranged in ways that aren’t always orderly, so that the house doesn’t appear too austere. Similarly, latticework is arranged to give the house a warm look and also to let in breeze and light as appropriate.

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Inside, especially in the living room – which is like a shady, roofed platform – we feel the air circulating around us, never too warm. This shows the success of the design plan, based on Thai-style traditional construction from roof to wide openings for air and light, but enhanced with modern materials such as steel, channeled through the wisdom of an architect with the ability to find solutions matching the wants and needs of the people who live here.

A Steel Frame Waterfront House That Blends Modernity with Context

A Steel Frame Waterfront House That Blends Modernity with Context

This home rises above a tall tai thun open space perfect for socializing, especially for large family gatherings. And it has some surprises inside.

/// THAILAND ///
Story: Samutcha Viraporn /// Photography: Sitthisak Namkham /// Design: Volume Matrix Studio 

There was already a residence built here, but it wasn’t designed with the evolving needs of such a big family in mind, so a new space was created, a new waterfront home where everyone could come together and guests could spend the night.

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 The steel used for columns, beams, stairs, and balconies is surplus material  from a large construction business belonging to the owner himself. “I had to scale the entire house to fit all that material,” said architect Kasin Sonsri, of Volume Matrix Studio as he spoke about the design challenges.

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This Ayutthaya home is put together to give the feel of a traditional Thai house, with its high tai thun to use as a multi-purpose courtyard, broad eaves reaching out, living area open and inviting to the outside breeze, house raised up to catch views of the river and the garden below. There’s a wide porch, an add-on extending out from the big house. Massive posts and beams are designed to showcase their structural utility as a part of the house, as do the steps up into the dining room, the walkways, the outside porch, and the rain gutters spilling water through a steel grate. All these elements combine to give a unique contemporary look to this house of steel and wood. The interior décor is simple. The second floor features an “open plan” separation of usable space: walls open up, reaching through from the kitchen into a large dining nook and from there into the living room area.

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Step up onto the third floor, and surprise! The décor completely changes and it’s as if you’ve suddenly dropped into a Japanese home, where the style of mats, windows, and doors all tell you why the owner named the house “Sala Zen.” In this room is a built-in cabinet where bedding is stored so that guests can easily come spend the night. Outside is a roof deck garden highlighted by an Onsen hot tub in an outdoor private spot that can’t be seen from the garden below.

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This home is composed of many elements, but they all blend to make this a truly Thai residence, a steel-framed waterfront house that’s warm and familial, fits perfectly into its context, and offers the experience of comfortable living with natural light and breezes and great views all around, on this small Ko Rian soi in Ayutthaya Province.

Steel House

Link: http://www.baanlaesuan.com/96717/houses/riverside-relaxation/2/

Compact House in a Rubber Forest

Compact House in a Rubber Forest

 The tree-filled beauty of the great outdoors makes for a relaxing place to live, which is why so many want this. Among these is the Norateedilok family, who made the dream a reality with this single-story modern-style house in a verdant forest of rubber trees.

/// THAILAND ///
Story: Ajchara Jeen., Trairat Songpao /// Photography:  Tanakitt Khum-on

Architect/Owner Nat (Rakchai Norateedilok) built this house for his mother, who wanted to be near her grandparents in Phatthalung Province. Here is a place near the rubber orchards she loves which she can call home and where she can socialize with friends of her generation. 

Compact House in a Rubber Forest
Nat with his older brother (right)


“There used to be a rice storehouse here,” said Nat. “The rubber orchard was planted later, and the trees had grown big and beautiful, so we decided to build the house here. Also, the front area is near the original main house kitchen, so there was no need to build a new kitchen. Stucco walls and a slanted black steel roof give it a smooth, simple look. The house’s 43 square meters hold a bedroom, bathroom, and living room.

“This house is on a ‘footing-style’ foundation. I put free-standing, unattached posts in the earth before adding floor beams and posts; this helps create good air flow. I pretty much left the interior planning to Mom’s preferences, so the design is for simplicity and ease of use.”

Steel House in a Rubber Forest
The many openings around the house open great views and bring in light all day long: high doors, glass-covered open spaces below the roof, and wide windows along walls.
The raised floor allows air flow below, guards against problems of ground moisture, and prevents unwanted bugs and animals from entering the house.

The location, in a rubber plantation, made choice of construction materials an important consideration. Nat primarily used concrete and real wood to give the house a look to match the surrounding environment. Synthetic wood was used where necessary, which also helped with the budget. Construction was done by local builders in only 4-5 months, so Nat was able to supervise the work himself and ensure the budget not exceed 700,000 baht.

Steel House in a Rubber Forest

Steel House in a Rubber Forest

Nat’s mother was in charge of the interior décor. In selecting furniture she kept the number of pieces to a minimum, just what was necessary to be able to relax in a clean, orderly place and feel close to nature. The resulting house is wonderfully livable and comfortable.

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A Bamboo House Embraced by Nature
A BAMBOO HOUSE EMBRACED BY NATURE

BRICK HOUSE FOR A TROPICAL CLIMATE

 

Steel House Surrounded by Nature

Steel House Surrounded by Nature

This box-shaped steel house, hidden in shady green woods, has a cool, peaceful resort atmosphere. – hard to believe it’s right in the middle of a congested city!

/// Thailand ///
Story: Korakada /// Photography:  W Workspace /// Design: BOONDESIGN

Steel House
wide eaves, glass windows set 3 meters in for shade and rain protection
Steel House
paved driveway leading into the carport 5 meters from the street
Steel House
Left: The dark of the steel house and bamboo blinds contrasts with surrounding greenery. Right: tai thun open space carport leads up into the house.

Designing architect Boonlert Hemvijitraphan of BOONDESIGN took up the challenge set by owner Thanthatch Leesiruang: create a home that is neither cramped or stuffy.

“That was the basic concept from the start. It’s not unlike a Thai-style house in landscaping and traditional tai thun lower open space. The challenge was to make that work within the urban context. Fortunately the owner gave us a completely free hand; our job was simply to design a comfortable residence on a 90-square-meter property. The starting point was what we saw in the original landscaping here,” said Boonlert.

Steel House
main door from carport into the living room 

Steel House

The property was not large, and its location right in the center of a capital city was seriously limiting. How to build a comfortable residence here? The garden/orchard greenery was used as a tool to create a sense of spaciousness. Instead of the house spreading outwards toward the fence, it rose vertically as a 2½-storey home with tai thun lower space used as carport and multipurpose area, the rest of the property becoming a relaxing, park-like space.

Steel House

High-ceilinged living room, naturally bright and airy, with a great view of outside greenery.

The large garden was set up to the south to get the best breeze and the best shade from plants and trees. The garden is planted on soil raised 1.2 meters higher than before to be level with the 3-meter height of the living room.

living room connects with dining area beneath the mezzanine, with kitchen behind the glass door
metal bookshelf reaching almost to the mezzanine also acts as weight-bearing support for the staircase behind it

The first floor has a high “double volume” ceiling for more natural light and ventilation. A steel staircase rises from the living room to the mezzanine, which holds a workroom and guest bedroom, and up to the second floor, the owner’s private space. The single staircase up from the carport connects everything from tai thun space to top floor.

Mezzanine walkway with banister and protective gratingSteel is the primary building material, but natural materials such as bamboo are also important. Bamboo shades cover the house façade, filtering sunlight, protecting against rain, giving privacy from outside view, yet still allowing good ventilation. “We used steel not because we especially wanted to use steel, but because it was light, and we wanted that quality. Each material has its own particular value. Coming up with a principle means coming up with the quality we want. Design is a value in itself.”

The architecture of this house reflects modern times. It’s surrounded by the natural environment people long for, so no matter chaotic and confused the outside world, in this home there’s a mood of relaxation and contentment: it’s just a great place to live.

Elevated porch connecting to the garden

Link : http://www.boondesign.co.th/

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A Steel House for a Big Family

A Steel House for a Big Family

After construction finished on this chic, modern loft-style steel home, the owner built three more future homes for his sons, with a connecting garden in the middle.

/// Thailand ///
Story: Wuthikorn Suthiapa /// Photography: Tanakitt Khum-on /// Design: Mee-D Architect Co., Ltd. by Piriya Techaratpong and Pawit Chuankumnerdkarn
 

Three houses connect with a wooden walkway reaching in from the big house, and a private garden in the middle.

In earlier times, as families outgrew their homes Thais used to build more houses on the same land, but this tradition has been disappearing. Nowadays, grown children move away into single-family houses of their own. In this case, though, Manit and Yanrak Manithikhun decided to build future homes for their children on their own property.

“We knew our sons would want their private space, and we had plenty of land, so we built right here. The three new buildings include one common house where the whole family can get together. It’s for entertaining guests, too. And I wanted an herb garden. Thinking forward to retirement!” said Manit.

Steel frames and brick walls: the hip, unfinished “loft” look.
In loft-style design, structure and décor work together, illustrated by this stairway as it half-echoes the roof line.
10 Steel Framed Houses We Like

10 Steel Framed Houses We Like

Steel framed homes can be stylishly fashionable. Building with steel is preferred for speed, strength, and durability. It is capable of encapsulating any architectural design and style, and adapting to any personal needs and tastes.

/// ASEAN ///

Where time is money, steel construction offers many advantages over traditional construction technology. Steel is a versatile material applicable to all structural uses, from framing to floor joists to roofing materials. Steel structures are ideal if you like loft style homes. Here are 10 cool steel framed homes that we like.

A Steel House for a Big Family

Link : http://livingasean.com/house/steel-house-3/


Modern Tropical House

Link : http://livingasean.com/house/modern-tropical-house-2/


 

Photo : Rungkit Charoenwat

Link : http://livingasean.com/house/steel-house/


  

Link : http://livingasean.com/house/box-shaped-house-tropical-style-garden/


 

Link : http://livingasean.com/house/mash-industrial-design-green-space/


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7

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Link : http://livingasean.com/house/studiomake-home-office-combination/


 

Link : http://livingasean.com/house/concrete-steel-combination-modern-house/


 

Link : http://livingasean.com/house/the-tinman-house/


 

Link : http://livingasean.com/house/set-aside-happiness/


 

Link : http://livingasean.com/house/modern-tropical-house-smart-roof/


 

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Stunning Airy House with a Twist

 

Studiomake / Home Office Combination

 

 

 

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