Blog : Home Renovation

Renovating an Old Bedroom to be a Bridal Home

Renovating an Old Bedroom to be a Bridal Home

These rooms are like a house within a house: they were once just a 90-square-meter bedroom on the second floor.

/// THAILAND ///
Story: Nawapat Dusdul /// Photography: Nantiya Busabong /// Design: Fatt! Studio
 

Starting life as a married couple, lovebirds Sitthidej Chirapanda and Nicha Pongstaporn took on the challenge of renovating Sitthidej’s sister’s old bedroom. After dividing a second-floor usable space of 70 square meters into living room and bedroom, they added in the 20-square-meter octagonal loft to create an art gallery.

Architects from Fatt! Studio took on the job, and kept the original structure almost intact, but did save space by changing the floating staircase from its original design to a helical (spiral) one, adding an implicit eye-catching point of interest to the space. This required careful measurement to get the proportions right, so tall people wouldn’t hit the ceiling going up. Here, too, the meticulous, painstaking work of master craftsmen was employed in creating a finely detailed brick wall. After a first coat of plain white paint they daubed, trimmed, and polished the bricks in different spots piece by piece to create the sort of unique patterning the residents were looking for.

The architects retained the original makha wood floor, carefully abrading the wood to soften it, then surfacing it with a round of oil-based finisher. It was decided to completely remove the original living room ceiling so as to open the space up much more. A ceiling-specific demolition method was used, enabling display of the bare surface of the red wood above, which was polished, softening colors until the unique grains of each panel showed clearly.

In the octagonal gallery the original window was replaced with a one set with square panes painted white, offsetting the black-paned sliding steel door between living room and bedroom. The division of the main floor is quite noticeable, as the colors split it off into two sections:  the living room is mainly white, while the bedroom is defined by darker, more austere tones, giving it a quieter, more restful mood.


Even on a day when the weather is not all that favorable, the overcast, sunless firmament shading the wall surfaces, the room we’re standing in exudes warmth of other kinds: it’s warm in color and style, and warmed by the smiles of this lovable couple who get to live on and on within this private space they themselves once called the stuff of dreams.

Link : www.facebook.com/fattstudioarchitect/

The Perfect Size Townhouse

The Perfect Size Townhouse

The townhouse is a common type of building in Thailand, especially in Bangkok. Home owner and architect Narong Othavorn grew up in one, always thinking of ways it could be better designed. Eventually he and his wife Pim Achariyasilpa decided to create their own home by renovating a 30-year-old townhouse in the Si Phraya neighborhood.

/// THAILAND ///
Story: Wuthikorn Suthiapa /// Photography: Soopakorn Srisakul 


The building combines two adjacent townhouses into one. Narong kept the original wrought-metal façade, modifying the original metal entrance door with a mixed frame of wood and steel, leaving the next-door side the entrance to a fourth-floor warehouse. A picture window in the living room brings in natural light onto washed gravel walls that lead down to a small garden behind the house,  inspiration for the “doublespace” mezzanine.


The doublespace ceiling isn’t only about making the lower level look good: it supports the open plan design. Glass panels in the dining nook of the mezzanine above extend a feeling of comfort to every space in the house. From the mezzanine there’s a continuous view through glass partitions out to the garden behind the house, and there’s steady circulation of air from front to back. Townhouses are apt to feel cramped, but not this one! The light is different in each area, but light is what connects everything.

“These things came from our own personal tastes. Pim likes well-lit spaces. Me, I like indirect light. So with a house for the two of us we had to get the division of space just right, using the light available in each area. The lower floor is bathed in a subdued natural light; upstairs the living room brightly lit through the front window. Moving back to the dining area and bar, the light is dimmer. Go upstairs to the bathroom and dressing areas and it’s lighter again, suiting the specific limitations and characteristics of each space.”

“Small, but spacious” is how both owners refer to this house: better than adequate, the size is really perfect. Not so small as to be cramped. Everywhere some things catch your eyes up close and others at a distance. The home offers a master class on how townhouse renovation can work with limited areas to create special, interesting spaces. Even though adjoining buildings make side windows impossible, careful arrangement of space and windows in higher levels give this house a beauty that is anything but ordinary.

Link : www.facebook.com/situ.based

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Siri House Family Co-living space / Home Renovation

SIRI HOUSE FAMILY CO-LIVING SPACE / HOME RENOVATION

From Shophouse to Stylish Home Office

FROM SHOPHOUSE TO STYLISH HOME OFFICE

Small House Renovation : a Family Solution

Small House Renovation : a Family Solution

Living ASEAN takes you to a house that looks small, but was remodeled to answer the needs of all family members. From the front it has a straightforward, contemporary look. Inside it has great ventilation.

/// Thailand ///
Story: Ajchara Jeenkram, Wuthikorn Suthiapa /// Photography: Sitthisak Namkham /// Owner & Designer: Mr.David Chan

Here we are in Selangor State, Malaysia, where a sign in front proclaiming “Dday Haus” informs us we’ve arrived at Mr. David Chan’s residence. The unusual name comes from the first initials of his and his sons Daniel  and Delan’s first names, even though the architect responsible for the house design, though, is actually more his wife, June Lim Sue May. You could say this is a continuation of David’s old house, which he uses as a home office and is tucked away right across a tiny village street.

This town house from the 90s retains its original façade but has been redone with better materials, giving it a contemporary flavor so that it stands out from its neighbors. Though the outward appearance hasn’t changed much, the interior is another story, featuring a full complement of conveniences, everything needed for comfortable modern living.

Perforated metal ceiling looks down from the balcony above – this is also a popular material for fences in Malaysia.
Next to the parlor is the kids’ homework room, and their work adorns the brick wall.

Downstairs, the children’s homework room adjoins the parlor, with the . kitchen and dining nook behind. Second floor splits left into a family room and children’s bedrooms, and to the right is the master bedroom with a mezzanine. David tells that the other house is used for an office and receiving guests, while this one is just for family life.

“We started out thinking this would be an office, but after more research we leaned more towards what we needed in this stage of our lives.” As a result, there are now more rooms, and more opportunity for family togetherness and comfortable living.

David spent many of his earlier years living in apartments, and enjoyed it, and the house is designed to reflect that. For instance there’s a section reaching up the entire four storeys which he calls “the tower.” A staircase winds upstairs from the kitchen on the first floor to a laundry/drying room on the second, and at the very top, a private living room with a mini swimming pool for the kids.

The family room has perforated metal floor panels, allowing a view of the children in the homework room below.

Twist and turn up the stairs to a compact bedroom.

The house is designed to meet the challenge of balancing close family connections with the need for privacy. A unique solution here is in the see-through metal gratings found here and there in walls and floor, which build a feeling of lightness into the house and give it personality.

David places high value on interior ventilation as needed for comfort: wind direction and flow were important design considerations. The air flow comes straight in through the long front balcony out to the back, then up through a service opening placed above to allow the release of hot air as the cooler breeze blowing in below keeps the house cool all day.

Link : https://www.dca.com.my/

From Shophouse to Stylish Home Office

From Shophouse to Stylish Home Office

Home offices are trendy nowadays. Given a complete makeover, a dull shophouse can transform into a fashionable home office like this one in Vietnam. Check this out.

/// Vietnam ///
Story: Block Architects /// Photography: Quang Dam /// Design: Đặng Đức Hoà of Block Architects

Clever design has transformed an unexciting shophouse in Vietnam into a home office that looked to be one of the trendiest.

“This house means everything to us because it is the fruit of constant efforts to pursue our dreams,” said the homeowners, a young married couple with an active lifestyle. They just bought the shophouse and decided to give it a makeover. The new design incorporated living spaces and a home office with factory producing handcrafted leather goods.

“For a product to be successful, say a handbag, it takes many processes involving fastidious needlework,” said the owners comparing their work to that of the architect. “Like meticulous craftsmen, the architect carefully puts together different parts to make a home, mixing old pieces with new ones, replacing unneeded features with practical ones, and relying on well thought-out plans to use every ingredient effectively, be it wood, brick, concrete, metal or even trees.”

That explains the elaborate structure that makes the new front façade. The sight is reminiscent of a giant labyrinth of fine needlework, albeit crafted of concrete and steel. Parts of the walls and flooring deemed to be unnecessary were removed to make space for new ideas. The redesigned front and rear facades showcase a multitude of steel cube shapes welded together to look like a web of fine threads being “sewn” together to fill the gap between two side walls. The welded steel rod paneling was painted white and decorated with green creepers. Despite its slender appearance, the design is strong enough for home protection, not to mention a light and airy feel it brings.

Inside, the old concrete stairway was removed to let natural light reach all the way to the lower floor. A new set of airy stairs with no risers was put in place instead. For a lightweight look, stair railings were crafted of steel rods painted white with wood treads in complementing shades. The uplifting design rendered the staircase looking as if it were hovering above the floor. In the kitchen and dining area, a long curvy counter stands in contrast to the stillness of rough red brick texture on the wall.

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Links: www.facebook.com/Blockarchitects.com.vn

An Amazing Before-and-After House Renovation

An Amazing Before-and-After House Renovation

Done right, a dull house that time clearly forgot can transform into a radiant modern home without losing its old charm. Looking for home renovation ideas? Check this out.

/// Thailand ///
Story: Supachart Boontang /// Photography: Rithirong Chanthongsuk, Soopakorn Srisakul, Nattawat Songsang

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Before: A tired looking façade // Photo: The owner
After: An entirely different story
After: An entirely different story

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This old house has stood in Bangkok for almost half a century. When it was time to leave their city condo to be with granny and grandpa, the owners at first wanted to do a complete tear-down to make room for a new house. They later decided otherwise.

“The initial plan called for replacing the tired looking old house with a three-story modern home and swimming pool,” said one of the owners. “But after much thought, we decided to keep the existing structure intact and focused on renovation, reason being that everything about it had a story to tell. Handed down from generation to generation, the house was long overdue for a makeover.”

The project started by taking out the beat-up wood façade on the upper floor and putting in a fresh new wall crafted of black sheet metal with windows in complementing shades. On the ground floor, the redesigned entrance received an elegant sliding door with matching glass windows that stood tall from floor to ceiling. For a light and airy entrance hall, the owners had a big chunk of the upper floor taken out, resulting in a spacious living room with double high ceilings.

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The open concept also applied to the kitchen and adjacent dining room, the owners’ favorite corners. The combined spaces boast a big dining table that also doubles as workspace and meeting room.

The redesigned interior speaks to an industrial loft style with a bit of vintage flair. Natural wood panels alternating with naked brick walls go hand in hand with pieces of rustic-style furniture. Meantime, they stand a welcome contrast to shiny floor tiles and kitchen countertops. It’s amazing how a home renovation done right can make all the difference.

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Incredible Small Townhouse Renovation

Incredible Small Townhouse Renovation

Wait until you see pictures of the interior. This tiny 80-square-meter townhouse was given a complete makeover. You will be mesmerized; it looks so incredible.

/// Malaysia ///
Story: Ajchara Jeenkram, Wuthikorn Suthiapa /// Photography: Sitthisak Namkham /// Owner/Designer: David Chan of Design Collective Architects (DCA)

Incredible Small Townhouse Renovation

Incredible Small Townhouse Renovation

Incredible Small Townhouse Renovation

 

For 40 years this modest, two-story home has stood in a residential neighborhood near Kuala Lumpur International Airport in Selangor. Noise pollution has turned many people away, but architect David Chan has grown so acquainted with living in the area that he decided to stay. A frequent flyer, he thinks it wise to live a stone’s throw away from it all.

No need to say renovation came as a challenge for Chan, who usually made a living designing larger houses. Strictly speaking he had a task that required great effort and was hard to accomplish: Create the good life in a space that was far from generous.

Incredible Small Townhouse Renovation

Incredible Small Townhouse Renovation

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He started out with ventilation improvements. To bring in crisp, clean air, solid front doors were removed and replaced with steel wire mesh paneling. Meantime, blowholes were put into the exterior wall to facilitate heat dissipation and increase indoor thermal comfort. Chan did a partial tear-down, turning the upper floor into a mezzanine. The result was a light and airy living space with double high ceilings. Where appropriate he added windows and other wall openings, and painted everything white and soft shades of gray to make the interior appear larger than it was.

Design being so well thought out, who needs air conditioning?
Design being so well thought out, who needs air conditioning?
For security window bars, simply does it.
For security window bars, simply does it.

Incredible Small Townhouse Renovation

Incredible Small Townhouse Renovation

Incredible Small Townhouse Renovation

Despite it being a small townhouse, Chan added some much needed patches of green to the design. He put a hole on the backyard floor and planted a leafy tree that was visible from the living room and bedroom.

The complete makeover went as planned. Chan and his family now live in a beautifully remodeled home on an expedient location that best suits their specific needs. Incredible as it may seem, the tiny home is where life begins again, and love never ends.

Incredible Small Townhouse Renovation

Link: www.dca.com.my

 

Clever Home Improvement Hacks to Give a Try

Clever Home Improvement Hacks to Give a Try

Every teardown has an impact on the look and feel of an environment in which you live. If you find your suburban home outdated, perhaps complete renovation or remodeling is a better way to breathe new life into it.

/// Malaysia ///

Story: Supachart Boontang /// Photography: Rithirong Chanthongsuk /// Owner/Designer: Farah Azizan (Studio Bikin)

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This two-story house is the home office of Farah Azizan, co-founder of Studio Bikin. It is located in Bangsar, a residential suburb on the outskirts of Kuala Lumpur.

“The house was built in 1950, almost seventy years ago. The structure is solid and everything else is in good shape,” said Azizan. “There is simple, timeless elegance to it. So, I decided to do complete renovation, combining a home and an office in one.”

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Azizan tried to keep all existing elements and structural integrity intact making the house capable of withstanding the desired loads for a long life. Metal grilles on the windows and doors and floor tiles were left the way they have always been. To create an airy interior living space, parts of the walls on the first floor were removed. Meantime, glass louvers were retained to aid in heat dissipation, improve air circulation, and allow plenty of natural daylight.

The owner added the loft style to the design by putting in cracked concrete wall textures for a little bit of grungy, urban feel. Special techniques helped make the ceilings and walls look interesting. This was achieved by lining the mold with plastic wraps before concrete was poured. Wrinkles in plastic sheets left their marks on concrete surfaces resulting in aesthetically pleasing textures.

Tricky space staircase: The treads may differ in shapes and sizes from one step to the other, but the stairs are safe to use.
Tricky space staircase: The treads may differ in shapes and sizes from one step to the other, but the stairs are safe to use.

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The decorating style is anything but obvious. The interior space boasts a mix-and-match style that goes together well with a modern loft ambience. This is evident in a set of teakwood sofa and leather butterfly chairs, and shelving filled with glistening utensils silhouetted against a textured concrete wall.

The handsome abode has been home to more than one generation, yet there is timeless elegance to it. The house has undergone complete renovation for comfortable living with modern amenities. Clever home improvement hacks have made it unique, trendy and cool in its own special way.

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Open Plan Urban Home / Home Renovation

Open Plan Urban Home / Home Renovation

Only few windows are enough to make this urban home an airy, comfort one.

/// Malaysia ///

Photography : Suphakon Srisakun /// Design : JTJ Design 

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Growing trees add some freshness and makes a house more of a great place to live in.

This home was designed and built in Malaysia by Tony Heneberry of JTJ Design under the concept of a great place to live in. From a former shophouse, the designer has turned the final look into an incredible house. The makeover started when Heneberry bought two buildings. He combined two units together and torn down separating walls to increase usable space.

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Cooking in this house is like cooking among the nature.

The 7-meter-wide façade looks much wider when Henebery removed the walls and existing partitions to assign new functions to the space. The living room/ dining area on the second floors is spacious with a lot of open area, following the “open plan” concept.

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Plants chosen for the hallway have medium-sized leaves to keep the house airy and not too dense.
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Using an “open plan” design means the interior is all connected, which avoids a cluttered look.
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The stairway with skylight roof is one of the spots everyone likes most.

The house’s main staircase was torn down and rebuilt in a better location. New metal stairways sit in a hallway next to the central courtyard, leading the way to the second floor. The courtyard is filled with tall trees, as a main relaxation area of the house where a glimpse of outdoor experience is bought inside in harmony. The trees also create continuity by naturally drawing the eyes towards the interior.

The stair to the third floor was set in another location. It sits against the outer wall, to preserve the space inside, which is an area for work and rest.

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The wooden roof is painted all white. /// The metal staircase structure is aesthetically pleasing. At the top, a skylight illuminates the stairwell.
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The second floor ceiling levels with the roof to receive natural light. High-ceiling gives more airy feel to the house, to cover disadvantages from having few windows.

As for the ventilation system, hot air is able to float up through the hallway, then flows out through window louvers and through the roof. Another plus is, this urban home faces south. So, by putting planter boxes on window frames, a simple vertical garden is added to filter sunlight and enhance privacy for residents at the same time.

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The hallway wall surface is covered with crushed concretes from the old shophouse. /// Vertical garden lined up on the window frames facing the street

link: http://www.jtjdesign.com.my/

Siri House Family Co-living space / Home Renovation

Siri House Family Co-living space / Home Renovation

From a 2-block shophouse, IDIN Architects re-imagined a modern co-living space for an extended family in the heart of Bangkok.

/// Thailand /// 

Story: Wuthikorn Suthipa /// Photo: Rithirong Chanthongsuk /// Design: IDIN Architects Co.,Ltd. 

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The new facade interpretation is direct, clean and outstanding. The facade forms a shape of a diamond as the family owns jewelry business.
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The building during the renovation.

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Building a spacious house on a solid ground may be a suitable choice for most people. But for Jeravej Hongsakul, an architect who came up with Siri House design, a vertical-shaped house in the city can be just the right place for a family too.

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The family unit on the top floor consists of a dining room and an inner living room, which serves as a home theater corner and a relaxing space.

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Siri House is situated in Surawongse Road, Bangkok. The place belongs to Suree Sirivatjanangkun where she lives with her siblings.
“The location is in an urban district,” Suree said. “So we figured it should also be an office for our family business. We would like to live together as one extended family, a big family in the business neighborhood.

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4 private units are stacked down below the family unit. Each room is accessible through the main hall, where natural light also comes through.

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“We wanted to fill a house with warmth but also fond of modern atmosphere. To create interactions between us, everyone should be able to see each other. We didn’t want to divide the space into one floor per person. It would be no different than living separately.”

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With this in mind, Jeravej came up with a solution. “I preferred each unit to be able to stand alone, but fully functional. I began by designing a living room, a bedroom, a working space, a double volume leisure room, a bathroom and a small kitchen. There were lots of functions. So, I needed to manage the space. I connected each unit through an accessible elevated hall, which also distribute natural light. Thus, each unit had its own unique shape.”

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A greenery hall is connected to a bedroom, while a balcony-like working space overlooks the double volume leisure area. This design gives the working space both an enjoyable cafe-esque view.
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Family business section is located on the ground floor with guest welcoming area. A light, graphical spiral staircase leads to a meeting room on a mezzanine.

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A house will always be a house. No matter it is constructed horizontally or vertically. Understanding the key to create an interaction in a family. It will eventually build an intimate bonding between members of a family or even between people in a city. Just as it occurs to Siri House.

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link: http://www.idinarchitects.com/

Row House in Chiang Mai / Home Renovation

Row House in Chiang Mai / Home Renovation

Plankrich, aka, Kwanchai Suthamsao is known as a trendsetter in row house renovation. He decided to build a home of his own in Chiang Mai.

/// Thailand /// 

Story: Atta Otto /// Photo: Sungwan Phratem /// Designer: Kwanchai Suthamsao

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The newly designed front façade boasts an interesting mix of lightweight materials. Weathered boards in slightly varying shades complement the pastel gray of fine-ribbed, corrugated metal sheet.

His fans and admirers may expected to see exciting construction techniques and exquisite materials, but it turned out the design was kept simple. Kwanchai’s main goal was building a house to meet his urban lifestyle. Thus, the prime location in the inner Chiang Mai city.

“A detached home was out of the question, the land was very expensive. Another option was a row house. After the survey, I chose this three-unit shop house. The size was right, I was able to give it a complete makeover.”

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The old staircase was removed to make room for a new set of stairs supported by an I-shaped steel beam.

Kwanchai literally removed everything out, including the old stairways. The only remaining were pillars and beams. The floor plans for all three units were completely redesigned. He wanted each unit to have its own characteristic, but the space was limited. So, he only focused on making the right corner look different instead.

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The small guest room with a bunk-bed is tucked away at the far end of the first floor.

The small guest room is tucked away at the far end of the first floor. Custom designed double bunks make it suitable for sleeping two guests.

The mezzanines were taken out. The omnipresence of reclaimed wood beams and floorboards brings back vintage charms. On the ground floor, sits a compact 2-person guest bedroom and a carport.

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A chunky upholstered sofa adds warm, cozy feelings to the interior. A window covers with a wooden blind allows natural light to shine through.

The second floor is neatly designed for multiple uses. The sitting room is in the front section, a dining space in the middle, and the kitchen and bathroom in the back. The dining area is a bit narrowed, to make room for the stairway. The décor exposes the owner’s love for vintage collectibles. Oblique-aligned wooden wall and floorboards gives a warm, homey feeling.

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The second floor features a dining space. The floor and the walls are covered in recycled boards from the homeowner’s collection.
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L-shaped design turns the small kitchen into a fluent cooking area. Cabinet doors in neutral shades make the room light and bright.
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Every space is neatly planned. The aisle separates the microwave and convection ovens from the washer and dryer. The door at the far end opens to the dining room.

On the third floor, the bedroom in the front section is kept clean and uncluttered. In-room dressing room and bathroom is separated by a sliding door. The interior continue to a neutral shade for relaxation. The décor is minimal with only few essential furniture.

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The bedroom is kept clean and uncluttered to provide a balance for limited spaces. The walls are covered in beech boards. Large sliding doors open to the cube-shaped glass enclosure that adorns the front façade.
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The changing room-cum-walk-in closet offers wardrobes on both sides of the aisle, which connects to the bathroom at the far end.

The key to this row house renovation is reclaimed wood. Added for more natural light are wide windows. The result is an airy house, one that is small but has everything for a vibrant city lifestyle.

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A glass wall with sliding door separates the laid-back sitting room from a compact semi-outdoor space. An opening in the exterior wall allows diffused natural light into the living space and the stairway.
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The midway landing offers a built-in cabinet made of reclaimed boards. On the way up, shoes are neatly stored here.
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Marks on the wall and concrete frame tell stories of a recent home makeover project. The owner intentionally left them as a personal reminder. /// A rusty sconce adds vintage charm to the naked concrete wall. Beneath is a wood box storage for home improvement tools.

 

link: http://www.plankrich.com/

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