Blog : HOUSES

Vietnam Traditional Brick House

Vietnam Traditional Brick House

Vietnamese architecture studio, Tropical Space, has designed a new modern tropical house, made from brick and concrete in Vietnam’s Long An province. Inspired by the Vietnam traditional structure, the bare brick house is located on a land parcel of 750 square meters, accompanied by 3 separate spaces and slope roof while using a modern and strong architectural language.

/// Vietnam ///
Story: Nawapat, Nipapat Dusdul /// Photography: Oki Hiroyuki /// Design: Tropical Space

Vietnam Traditional Brick House

The thing that never changes is that most Tropical Space’s design works make use of bricks partly because they are inherently Vietnamese material and indigenous to the area. At the same time, with a deep understanding of Vietnamese culture and climate, they are committed to the use of environment-friendly building practices and sustainable material selection.   

Vietnam Traditional Brick House

Vietnam Traditional Brick House

Vietnam Traditional Brick House

The Long An House has designed for hot and humid climate and is maximizing the ventilation efficiency by dividing the roof into two parts and having a court yard; then allocating two corridors to connecting the roof. This way has created a court yard and big walls. These porous walls can allow breeze to flow through the house.

Vietnam Traditional Brick House

Vietnam Traditional Brick House

Vietnam Traditional Brick House

The Vietnam traditional house is stretched from front to back creating continuous functional spaces. These spaces’ boundaries are estimated by light with different intensity and darkness. With this layout, the wind can flow through the house in every season.  

Vietnam Traditional Brick House

The front yard of the house is made by the hollow clay which can absorb the rain and cool down the floor in summer heat. Next to the yard is a buffer space which created the light transition from the yard to the living room, dining room and bedroom.

The kitchen area, located in the north side along with functional spaces, is suitable for traditional cooking and spending precious time with family.

The mezzanine accommodates with two bedrooms. All spaces between relaxing area, reading area and a long corridor are connected, having two stairs on both ends because the design team wants to have a continuous space between the functional areas inside and outside the house, so that the children can play and move freely, throughout the house without being confined by separate walls.

Vietnam Traditional Brick House

Vietnam Traditional Brick House

 

Link: khonggiannhietdoi.com

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The Perfect Size Townhouse

The Perfect Size Townhouse

The townhouse is a common type of building in Thailand, especially in Bangkok. Home owner and architect Narong Othavorn grew up in one, always thinking of ways it could be better designed. Eventually he and his wife Pim Achariyasilpa decided to create their own home by renovating a 30-year-old townhouse in the Si Phraya neighborhood.

/// THAILAND ///
Story: Wuthikorn Suthiapa /// Photography: Soopakorn Srisakul 


The building combines two adjacent townhouses into one. Narong kept the original wrought-metal façade, modifying the original metal entrance door with a mixed frame of wood and steel, leaving the next-door side the entrance to a fourth-floor warehouse. A picture window in the living room brings in natural light onto washed gravel walls that lead down to a small garden behind the house,  inspiration for the “doublespace” mezzanine.


The doublespace ceiling isn’t only about making the lower level look good: it supports the open plan design. Glass panels in the dining nook of the mezzanine above extend a feeling of comfort to every space in the house. From the mezzanine there’s a continuous view through glass partitions out to the garden behind the house, and there’s steady circulation of air from front to back. Townhouses are apt to feel cramped, but not this one! The light is different in each area, but light is what connects everything.

“These things came from our own personal tastes. Pim likes well-lit spaces. Me, I like indirect light. So with a house for the two of us we had to get the division of space just right, using the light available in each area. The lower floor is bathed in a subdued natural light; upstairs the living room brightly lit through the front window. Moving back to the dining area and bar, the light is dimmer. Go upstairs to the bathroom and dressing areas and it’s lighter again, suiting the specific limitations and characteristics of each space.”

“Small, but spacious” is how both owners refer to this house: better than adequate, the size is really perfect. Not so small as to be cramped. Everywhere some things catch your eyes up close and others at a distance. The home offers a master class on how townhouse renovation can work with limited areas to create special, interesting spaces. Even though adjoining buildings make side windows impossible, careful arrangement of space and windows in higher levels give this house a beauty that is anything but ordinary.

Link : www.facebook.com/situ.based

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Siri House Family Co-living space / Home Renovation

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From Shophouse to Stylish Home Office

FROM SHOPHOUSE TO STYLISH HOME OFFICE

Compact House in a Rubber Forest

Compact House in a Rubber Forest

 The tree-filled beauty of the great outdoors makes for a relaxing place to live, which is why so many want this. Among these is the Norateedilok family, who made the dream a reality with this single-story modern-style house in a verdant forest of rubber trees.

/// THAILAND ///
Story: Ajchara Jeen., Trairat Songpao /// Photography:  Tanakitt Khum-on

Architect/Owner Nat (Rakchai Norateedilok) built this house for his mother, who wanted to be near her grandparents in Phatthalung Province. Here is a place near the rubber orchards she loves which she can call home and where she can socialize with friends of her generation. 

Compact House in a Rubber Forest
Nat with his older brother (right)


“There used to be a rice storehouse here,” said Nat. “The rubber orchard was planted later, and the trees had grown big and beautiful, so we decided to build the house here. Also, the front area is near the original main house kitchen, so there was no need to build a new kitchen. Stucco walls and a slanted black steel roof give it a smooth, simple look. The house’s 43 square meters hold a bedroom, bathroom, and living room.

“This house is on a ‘footing-style’ foundation. I put free-standing, unattached posts in the earth before adding floor beams and posts; this helps create good air flow. I pretty much left the interior planning to Mom’s preferences, so the design is for simplicity and ease of use.”

Steel House in a Rubber Forest
The many openings around the house open great views and bring in light all day long: high doors, glass-covered open spaces below the roof, and wide windows along walls.
The raised floor allows air flow below, guards against problems of ground moisture, and prevents unwanted bugs and animals from entering the house.

The location, in a rubber plantation, made choice of construction materials an important consideration. Nat primarily used concrete and real wood to give the house a look to match the surrounding environment. Synthetic wood was used where necessary, which also helped with the budget. Construction was done by local builders in only 4-5 months, so Nat was able to supervise the work himself and ensure the budget not exceed 700,000 baht.

Steel House in a Rubber Forest

Steel House in a Rubber Forest

Nat’s mother was in charge of the interior décor. In selecting furniture she kept the number of pieces to a minimum, just what was necessary to be able to relax in a clean, orderly place and feel close to nature. The resulting house is wonderfully livable and comfortable.

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A Bamboo House Embraced by Nature
A BAMBOO HOUSE EMBRACED BY NATURE

BRICK HOUSE FOR A TROPICAL CLIMATE

 

ReGEN House: Modern Home, Thai Concept, Great for Family Members of All Ages

ReGEN House: Modern Home, Thai Concept, Great for Family Members of All Ages

“ReGEN House,” Pankwan Hudthagosol’s home, was designed as a modern residence for a multigenerational family. Built on the same property as his father’s house, its concept echoes his father’s belief that the gift of warmth and closeness can show us how to think and live, and both welcomes and provides a foundation in life for young Mena, the newest family member. It began with a great design from EKAR Architects.

/// THAILAND ///
Story: foryeah! /// Photography:  Chalermwat Wongchompoo /// 
Owner: Pankwan Hudthagosol  /// Architect: EKAR /// Interior Architect: Define Studio  /// Landscape Architect: Grounds play Studio  /// Structural Engineer: Sommuek Apiraksa

Modern Home ReGEN House Ekar Architects
The four-storey building on about ¼ acre of land has an interior space of 1600 meters. Its L-shaped layout opens on a green courtyard facing the forest-like garden at “Grandpa’s” house, connecting views for the people of three generations.

Modern Home ReGEN House Ekar Architects Modern Home ReGEN House Ekar ArchitectsModern Home ReGEN House Ekar Architects

The first floor holds a carport, maid’s bedroom, and rooms for swimming pool equipment and other services. The heart of the house is the second storey, where a wide balcony/deck taking up a full half of the floor space is used for family recreational activities. This floor is designed to give the sense of being at ground level, as it reaches out to a “green roof” planted with ground cover seemingly floating atop a gazebo rising from the garden below, and with a swimming pool right there giving the feeling of an old-time streamside home.

Modern Home ReGEN House Ekar Architects Modern Home ReGEN House Ekar Architects

10 Inspiring Modern Tropical Houses

10 Inspiring Modern Tropical Houses

Living ASEAN has selected our favorite houses in the ASEAN for 2017. Of course, all of them present practical solutions for living in the hot and humid climate of Southeast Asia, including a bamboo house in Thailand, a concrete block house in Thailand and a modern tropical house in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. Check them out!


THAILAND // A BAMBOO HOUSE EMBRACED BY NATURE

A bamboo house with contemporary appeal sits immersed in its natural surroundings. The home that’s also a medical clinic belongs to Nopharat Pitchanthuk MD, and his wife Kanyapak Silawatanawongse. Without question, his interest in the natural therapeutic concept is expressed in the warm, inviting atmosphere of the home office. The orthopedic doctor provides specialized care for the musculoskeletal system in the comfort of a peaceful country setting.

Read more: http://livingasean.com/house/a-bamboo-house-embraced-by-nature/

 

Concrete Block House
THAILAND // CONCRETE BLOCK HOUSE

Intanon Chantip, INchan atelier architect and owner of this HUAMARK 09 building, designed it to test theories he’d arrived at through intense study and experience. He wanted the architecture to tell its own story through the charm of materials that change over time. Intanon and his wife Tharisra Chantip bought this a 30-year-old, 80 square wa (.8 acres) property in the Hua Mark district, demolishing the old house to erect a new four-storey mixed-use building with usable space of 490 square meters and combine office, residence, and art studio.

Read more: http://livingasean.com/house/concrete-block-house/

 


VIETNAM // MODERN TROPICAL HOUSE IN HO CHI MINH CITY

The architecture of this modern tropical house in Ho Chi Minh City is perfectly suited to the hot, humid climate, with an imaginative counterpoint of plants, greenery, and airy openings keeping it shady and pleasant inside and out.

Read more: http://livingasean.com/house/modern-tropical-house/

 

Waterside Home
THAILAND // WATERSIDE HOME

This waterside tropical house brings back memories of Thai life as it was along Khlong Samsen in bygone times. From outside it looks straightforward and contemporary, but inside is a fascinating mix of antiques from the owners’ collections.

Read more: http://livingasean.com/house/waterside-home/

 

Wooden Thai House in the Lanna Tradition
THAILAND // WOODEN THAI HOUSE IN THE LANNA TRADITION

This Lanna Thai house of wood is built based on ancient local traditions. It has a simple, relaxed, and open look. Natural breezes blow all day long through its exquisite form, full of the charm of conservation-friendly Lanna craftsmanship.

Read more: http://livingasean.com/house/wooden-thai-house-in-the-lanna-tradition/

 

trc12
MALAYSIA // BOX-SHAPED HOUSE WITH THE TEXTURE OF MEMORY

This box-shaped house uses architecture, architectural elements, and coordinated interior design to tell stories of the present and the past. The house is located in the Petalang Jaya district of Selangor, Malaysia. This is a district of single homes, but with little space to put up a large house. Still, architect Dr. Tan Loke Mun rose to the challenge of house owner Kenneth Koh and tore down the former structure here to build a new 3-storey home in its place.

Read more: http://livingasean.com/house/box-shaped-house-texture-memory/

 

Living with Cats in a Beautiful House
MALAYSIA // LIVING WITH CATS IN A BEAUTIFUL HOUSE

Ever wonder why this is a dream house for kind pet owners and their feline companions?.

“I live with my wife and our seven cats in this house,” said Chan Mun Inn of Design Collective Architects (DCA). “There used to be only four, but I adopted more cats. So I ended up with seven of them. They were the reason that we left our old apartment and built a new home in the suburb.”

Read more: http://livingasean.com/house/living-with-cats-beautiful-house/

 

Brick house For a Tropical Climate
VIETNAM // BRICK HOUSE FOR A TROPICAL CLIMATE

This rectangular brick home in Vietnam’s Ho Chi Minh City is designed for “hot and humid,” open to natural light and cool from air currents constantly streaming in and out through the bricks. Mr. Tung Do and Mrs. Lien Dinh, the owners here, are newlyweds who wanted a small house with a straightforward design for pleasant living. They had seen Tropical Space’s “Termitary House,” which won, among others, a 2016 Brick Award, and admired its form and design so much that – even with their limited budget – they engaged the Company to design and build their own home.

Read more: http://livingasean.com/house/brick-house-for-a-tropical-climate/

 

Box-Shaped House with a Tropical Style Garden
THAILAND // BOX-SHAPED HOUSE WITH A TROPICAL STYLE GARDEN

Box-shaped design highlights a perfect blend of form and function, plus an exotic Tropical style garden. The result: A lovable livable home with a panoramic view from the bedroom.

“This house was not built to be photogenic,” said Patchara Wongboonsin, architect at POAR, when asked about his outstanding design. The 350-square-meter, modern cube-shaped house took two years in the making.

Read more: http://livingasean.com/house/box-shaped-house-tropical-style-garden/

 

Modern House in a Forest Setting
THAILAND // MODERN HOUSE IN A FOREST SETTING

The architect uses clever techniques to make this modern house look like it’s crafted entirely of wood. When her family wanted to build a new house in Thailand’s Northeast, Kanika Ratanapridakul was assigned the task of project architect. It was the first time she had to work directly with local builders and suppliers. Things didn’t go as smooth as planned, but the mission was accomplished – eventually. The key to success lay in being a bit more flexible to ensure things got done right and on schedule.

Read more: http://livingasean.com/house/modern-house-forest-setting/

 

 

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A Bamboo House Embraced by Nature

A Bamboo House Embraced by Nature

A bamboo house with contemporary appeal sits immersed in its natural surroundings. The home that’s also a medical clinic belongs to Nopharat Pitchanthuk MD, and his wife Kanyapak Silawatanawongse. Without question, his interest in the natural therapeutic concept is expressed in the warm, inviting atmosphere of the home office. The orthopedic doctor provides specialized care for the musculoskeletal system in the comfort of a peaceful country setting.

/// THAILAND ///
Story: Napasorn Srithong /// Photography:  Nathawut Pengkamphoo, Anupong Chaisukkasem /// Stylist: Suanpuk VRW

Dr. Nopharat and his better half Kanyapak are all smiles in front of their bamboo house.

Asked how all this was accomplished, the physician said: “Upon graduation from medical school, I taught medicine and operated a clinic in Bangkok for several years before coming out to Pak Chong District, Nakhon Ratchasima. At first, we opened a branch office in the city area just to get an idea about patient demands in the provinces. 

The attractive two-story home is evidence of streamlined design that fits into the natural surroundings.
Bamboo is the material of choice for the design encapsulating the good qualities of Thai-style residential architecture. Gable roof is pitched at an angle that drains storm water fast, thus preventing against leaking.
The attractive two-story home is evidence of streamlined design that fits into the natural surroundings.

“I was fortunate enough to receive help from a kindhearted person senior to me. He wanted to help patients in the rural area to have access to medical care. So, he let us use a facility free of charge for the purpose of opening a clinic. After having done it for a while, we felt like we were overstaying the welcome. At the same time, we needed a facility that would be more relaxed and convenient for the patients –  preferably a greenery space that was comfortable, well lighted, open and airy. Just didn’t want them to feel tense and unable to relax as was the case with a hospital visit in general. 

She said: “For a while, we went searching for a location that would suit our specific needs. We eventually came to a parcel of land that Kanyapak’s mother had bought some 20 years back. It was woodland filled with dense shrubbery and other plants. We had the area cleared to make room for a grassy lawn, and had new trees planted. Eventually it was ready for a wedding ceremony to take place. Needless to say we have grown emotionally attached to it from day one. Hence, the new house and the medical clinic that has been relocated from the city.

A hanging fixture directs light to specific points in the main hallway. Ample glass windows and transoms allow plenty of natural light during daytime hours.
A hanging fixture directs light to specific points in the main hallway. Ample glass windows and transoms allow plenty of natural light during daytime hours.
Exposed brickwork alternating with timber in shades of warm earth tones adorns the dining area adjoining the kitchen.
High ceilings, big windows, and open floor plans combine to make the interior space look large and airy. On one side, a mezzanine is easily accessible from the living room.
A sofa set in shades of indigo paired with earth tones on the walls and floor reduces a monotonous regularity in the interior living space. Nearby, a large awning window opens up to connect with the outdoors.

Bamboo is strong and can be used proportionally to the weights for which it’s intended. It’s fast growing, easy to find, and reasonable as a building material. While it’s prone to be affected by moisture and insects, it can last a long time if well maintained.  

Concrete Block House

Concrete Block House

 Non (Intanon Chantip), INchan atelier architect and owner of this HUAMARK 09 building, designed it to test theories he’d arrived at through intense study and experience. He wanted the architecture to tell its own story through the charm of materials that change over time.

/// Thailand ///
Story: foryeah! /// Photography:  Nantiya /// Design: INchan atelier

Concrete Block House
The house resembles four stacked 3.6-meter boxes; fence and first floor outer walls are painted white to relieve the three storeys of grey above and bringing it closer to the look of other houses

Non and his wife Ploy (Tharisra Chantip) bought this a 30-year-old, 80 square wa (.8 acres) property in the Hua Mark district, demolishing the old house to erect a new four-storey mixed-use building with usable space of 490 square meters and combine office, residence, and art studio.

Concrete Block House
The façade is intentionally of cement blocks, which collect residue and change color with the seasons; outer metal grates let climbing vines grow naturally

Dividing the property into northern and southern sections, they raised the property level more than 40 percent to put in a garden to the north, then a rectangular building to the south. The building’s long side runs east-west to block prevailing winds and allow openings to control sunlight and breeze entry into the house.

The house’s four-meter width is comparable to most row houses. Each side has double walls that work simultaneously for ventilation and heat insulation, with door and window openings reinforcing the building’s primary relationship to weather conditions, wind, and sun.

On the south side are fewer openings because of a staircase, while north and east sides have balconies and various service areas reaching around to the west side, which also has the double walls characteristic of the building’s overall design.

Concrete Block House

Concrete Block House

Concrete Block House

The 4 storeys are divided according to function. Architects’ offices are primarily in two first floor rooms: a larger one with a long work table for working in teams and a smaller one that serves as meeting room and library.

The second floor is a private residential area, with a living room connecting to kitchen and dining area. 

Concrete Block House

Concrete Block House

Concrete Block House

Concrete Block House

Floor 3 contains one bedroom for Non and Ploy and another for Non’s mother. The two are connected with a shared bathroom. 

The fourth floor is a studio for creation and enjoyment of art. It’s designed with a view to high flexibility of function in expectation of anticipated future changes as little members of the household gradually grow up.

Concrete Block House

Concrete Block House

Concrete Block House

Concrete Block House

Concrete Block House

Concrete Block House

Concrete Block House

Link: http://www.inchan-atelier.com/ 

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Compact Tropical House

Compact Tropical House

In house design, the phrase “limited space” raises worrisome questions for some. Here, though, owner Ek (Sarin Nilsonthi) used modern tropical design techniques and inner space connectivity to build large-house functionality and comfort into a compact area.

/// Thailand ///
Story: Wuttikorn Suthiapa /// Photography: Soopakorn Srisakul  /// Design: D Kwa Architect 

“I designed this house on one A4 sheet of paper,” Ek says with a smile.

“Since it’s small, I tried to write down all the functionality we’d need on a single sheet of paper, and named the house ‘PSA,’ from ‘Paper Series A.’ The name actually has nothing to do with the A4 paper dimensions, it’s just an attempt at humor.” 

Compact Tropical House

This “compact tropical” house is all about size and proportion. Posts and beams are angled and separated in unusual ways to create the right kind of space in each place.

“We didn’t set the beams and posts this way because we wanted to, but in order to set things up in the right way. Still, anyone living in this house will have to be the same height as my wife and I, ha ha!”

Compact Tropical House

Coming in, the first thing we see is a large steel panel, which Ek leaves rusted to show a stylish authenticity of construction materials; this panel shields the second floor from heat while showing off the shipping-container design of the office area. Below is a carport paved with fine gravel reaching up to the house entrance.

Compact Tropical House
Carport and relaxation area beneath the container-shaped office

Compact Tropical House

Ek intentionally shortened the fence, bringing it inwards to create a clearly defined “inside the fence” area, a gravel yard with benches and trees which actually becomes a part of the house itself. The house walls are rough concrete all around, and H-beams sunk into the yard support the office section, which is raised above a lower area where Ek and his wife Pla (Pairin Boonpinid ) plan to open a café in the future.

Compact Tropical House
This inside tree is integral to the design, adding shade and a refreshing atmosphere

Inside, on the lower floor living room, dining area, and kitchen are all connected, each ceiling at a different level. For good ventilation and a sense of spaciousness, the living room ceiling is “doublespace.” Ceilings in the dining area and kitchen are lower, with electric lighting giving them each a unique identity. The staircase has no railing, so is accessed from any direction; you can just walk down to sit and relax in the dining area, which is also used to store kitchen necessities: spices, condiments, even a refrigerator.

Living room with “doublespace” ceiling and tall glass windows on both sides
Living room with “doublespace” ceiling and tall glass windows on both sides  
Openings perfectly arranged to let in air and light for a spacious feeling

Going up the stairs and turning left brings us into the container-shaped office, the rusted outer wall reaching up to the third floor as protection against heat. The container surface is rainproof, with a layer of insulation between it and a pressed wood surface that gives an orderly look to the interior. On this floor also is a guest bedroom, currently used as a reading room, but planned as AirB&B tourist accommodation once the café opens.

The workroom opens to greenery on both sides, and includes storage space and a large table for work and meetings
The workroom opens to greenery on both sides, and includes storage space and a large table for work and meetings

The master bedroom entrance is in back, along a walkway next to the kitchen; Khun Ek designed it as a separate building, so as to remain private when the café/hostel section opens, accessible without going through other sections of the house. Here the floor is raised up above the ground as protection against moisture, and there is a skylight above for indirect lighting.

This bedroom has a “floating” storage space above reached by ladder, clothes closet below, a bed directly on the floor to give more space, and a bare cement ceiling positioned for to reflect light indirectly

A tree reaches up into the second floor, its top directly in front of the office’s picture window This and other features combine to give this compact house a comfortable, airy feeling, enhanced by imaginative placement of openings for breezes and natural light. Ek refers to the greenery and openness as creating “breathing space,” as rooms are all interconnected, airy, sunny, and in touch with the natural world.

Compact House
Bedroom in back has a slightly raised floor

Ek likens this house design to a well-tailored suit: the tailor has to measure, ask about the wearer’s taste, and plan everything to be comfortable and pleasing.

Link : facebook.com/DeeKwa71

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Steel House Surrounded by Nature

Steel House Surrounded by Nature

This box-shaped steel house, hidden in shady green woods, has a cool, peaceful resort atmosphere. – hard to believe it’s right in the middle of a congested city!

/// Thailand ///
Story: Korakada /// Photography:  W Workspace /// Design: BOONDESIGN

Steel House
wide eaves, glass windows set 3 meters in for shade and rain protection
Steel House
paved driveway leading into the carport 5 meters from the street
Steel House
Left: The dark of the steel house and bamboo blinds contrasts with surrounding greenery. Right: tai thun open space carport leads up into the house.

Designing architect Boonlert Hemvijitraphan of BOONDESIGN took up the challenge set by owner Thanthatch Leesiruang: create a home that is neither cramped or stuffy.

“That was the basic concept from the start. It’s not unlike a Thai-style house in landscaping and traditional tai thun lower open space. The challenge was to make that work within the urban context. Fortunately the owner gave us a completely free hand; our job was simply to design a comfortable residence on a 90-square-meter property. The starting point was what we saw in the original landscaping here,” said Boonlert.

Steel House
main door from carport into the living room 

Steel House

The property was not large, and its location right in the center of a capital city was seriously limiting. How to build a comfortable residence here? The garden/orchard greenery was used as a tool to create a sense of spaciousness. Instead of the house spreading outwards toward the fence, it rose vertically as a 2½-storey home with tai thun lower space used as carport and multipurpose area, the rest of the property becoming a relaxing, park-like space.

Steel House

High-ceilinged living room, naturally bright and airy, with a great view of outside greenery.

The large garden was set up to the south to get the best breeze and the best shade from plants and trees. The garden is planted on soil raised 1.2 meters higher than before to be level with the 3-meter height of the living room.

living room connects with dining area beneath the mezzanine, with kitchen behind the glass door
metal bookshelf reaching almost to the mezzanine also acts as weight-bearing support for the staircase behind it

The first floor has a high “double volume” ceiling for more natural light and ventilation. A steel staircase rises from the living room to the mezzanine, which holds a workroom and guest bedroom, and up to the second floor, the owner’s private space. The single staircase up from the carport connects everything from tai thun space to top floor.

Mezzanine walkway with banister and protective gratingSteel is the primary building material, but natural materials such as bamboo are also important. Bamboo shades cover the house façade, filtering sunlight, protecting against rain, giving privacy from outside view, yet still allowing good ventilation. “We used steel not because we especially wanted to use steel, but because it was light, and we wanted that quality. Each material has its own particular value. Coming up with a principle means coming up with the quality we want. Design is a value in itself.”

The architecture of this house reflects modern times. It’s surrounded by the natural environment people long for, so no matter chaotic and confused the outside world, in this home there’s a mood of relaxation and contentment: it’s just a great place to live.

Elevated porch connecting to the garden

Link : http://www.boondesign.co.th/

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Modern Style in a Newly Renovated House

Modern Style in a Newly Renovated House

The houses in this subdivision all looked the same when his parents brought him here as a child; now he’s renovated this one into a hip, modern structure with 200 square meters of usable space on a property of 400 square meters.

/// Thailand ///
Story: Foryeah! /// Photography:  Nantiya Busabong /// Owner: Roj Kanjanabanyakhom /// Design: Atom Design Co., Ltd.

Lower floor retains the old “tai thun” space below, a brick wall with angled patterns perforated for ventilation on the floor above.
A staircase up to the hobby room, apparently playfully designed for legs of different lengths.
The old house wall was removed in favor of tall “picture windows”
Leaving open space between the old house and the addition makes for good ventilation and cooling.

“After studying abroad I lived in a condo for years, but modern urban life is too full of needless accessories, so I finally came back to this house for its serenity and privacy. I like peace and quiet, listening to music, watching movies, that’s enough,” said Roj Kanjanabanyakhom.

An architect himself, he was the designer and construction supervisor. Since the house was in an old subdivision there were a lot of problems: leaks and seepage, rusty pipes, etc, even asbestos tile, now recognized as carcinogenic. The structure had to be almost completely torn down to its basic frame: pillars, beams, and a couple of walls.

To suit Roj’s lifestyle, striking improvements were made in both the new building in front and the old house: gray cobblestone contrasting with bright orange brick walls, angle-patterned bricks with ventilation spaces. Formerly an open tai thun area, half the ground floor, became his own bicycle maintenance shop, with the other half a carport. On the second floor is a hobby workshop, and above that a roof deck where support pillars are capped with metal plates in anticipation of future additions.

The 2.4-meter outside wall of the old house was demolished and replaced with tall glass windows all around for a spacious feeling. Bedrooms on the second floor were removed to create a “doublespace” area, and a projector set up behind one wall for full-size movie viewing. For the new addition in back, on the first floor are kitchen, dining room, and living room. Above, the second floor is the private area, with main bedroom, guest bedroom, and dressing room.

A skylight was put in to let sunlight in all day, relieving the stuffy, damp, dark atmosphere, and polycarbonate tile was laid on floor and walls.

“There were some difficult structural and material design limitations in the old house. Parts of the old roof weren’t able to support much weight, so besides replacing the asbestos with double Roman tile we used metal purlin trusses instead of wood. To avoid joint problems where the new roof meets the old gabled one, we used steel-reinforced flat slab concrete, which will be able to hold the weight of future additions.

“Sometimes it’s easier and cheaper just to tear everything out. I renovated because I wanted to preserve the memories here,” said Roj with a smile. And so here’s a home filled with remembrance, ready to bring present and future memories into the mix.

The roof deck, designed to hold weight for future additions and a path connecting the two buildings.

 

Link : https://www.facebook.com/atom.design.bkk/

 


 

 

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