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6 Famous Artists You Can’t Miss at the Bangkok Art Biennale 2018

6 Famous Artists You Can’t Miss at the Bangkok Art Biennale 2018

The final countdown has begun. Every second brings you closer to a world-class contemporary art exhibition featuring 75 celebrated artists from across the globe. The Bangkok Art Biennale 2018 will begin on October 19 and continue until February 3, 2019. Happiness is only real when shared. So, mark your calendar!

Story: Singhanart Nakpongphun /// Photographs: (Wisut Ponnimit) Sitthisak Namkham /// Photo credit: Yayoi Kusama, courtesy of Ota Fine Arts, Tokyo /// Photos: courtesy of participating artists

The three-month period will see 20 famous landmarks around the capital transform into thriving art scenes, among them Wat Phra Chetupon, a.k.a. the Temple of the Reclining Buddha (Wat Pho for short), the Bangkok Art and Cultural Center, and One Bangkok, a mega development project that’s shaping the future of the city. See also gallery details at the end.

Here are the first six artists that you can’t miss.

  1. MARINA ABRAMOVIĆ

World renowned as a pioneer in performance art, Abramović uses her own body as medium in exploring the physical and mental limits of her being. She is best known for her groundbreaking durational works titled “The Artist is Present” hosted by the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York City. The artist gave live performances from March to May 2010, during which she sat in silence at the table throughout the run of the show for a total of 736 hours. All day Abramović would not respond, but museum visitors were willing to wait in line for a chance to sit across from her for as long as they wanted.

The Bangkok Art Biennale 2018 offers the opportunity to experience the works of Abramović at two separate events. First, the exhibition titled “Standing Structures” provides a glimpse into the world of communication through silence. It takes place at the mega development project One Bangkok, located on Rama IV Road. And from October 8 to November 12, 2018 only, a team from the Marina Abramović Institute (MAI) presents the other event called “Method,” which is an exercise about being present in both time and space.

The exhibition “Standing Structures” explores interactive communication in silence.
“Method” is an exercise presented by a team of artists from the Marina Abramović Institute (MAI).

 

  1. YAYOI KUSAMA

89-year-old Japanese contemporary artist Yayoi Kusama is passionate about polka dots. She has taken a great interest in the design since she was little. The Queen of Polka Dots, as she is affectionately called, also works in sculpture, painting, and installation. Her devotion to lively bright color patterns has influenced generation after generation of contemporary artists. No doubt one of the most famous artists in Japan, Kusama has won critical acclaim worldwide, including the Best Gallery Show awarded by the International Confederation of Art Critics in Belgium and several experimental cinema awards given by the Government of France. Her eye-catching design has attracted the attention of many, including the high fashion brand Louis Vuitton. As may be expected, the products of collaborative design with Kusama sold out fast.

It’s hard not to be romantic about Kusama’s beautiful works of art during the Bangkok Art Biennale 2018, among them the famous polka dots pumpkins that will be on view at Central World and Siam Paragon. Equally impressive is a Mini Cooper that has been pimped up Kusama style. The car is on show at One Bangkok.

“Inflatable Pumpkins Balloons” installations transform the perception of a space.
A mosaic of vivacious colors adorns a silver sculpture that’s part of a collection called “I Carry on Living with the Pumpkins”.
Black polka dots on red, part of the “I Carry on Living with the Pumpkins” collection.
  1. CHOI JEONG HWA  

Korean artist-cum-designer Choi Jeong Hwa has authoritative skill in effective us of space with many awards to his name. He is expert at building outdoor installations and turning unthinkable, day-to-day materials into stunning works of art. In 2008, he designed a large-scale installation that completely surrounded the Seoul Olympic Stadium with 1.7 million recycled and found objects. He also created a big plastic tree that pulsated with regular throbbing sensation as if it were breathing. Choi said that he had no definition to offer for his artworks. They were up to the viewers to interpret based on their different life experiences. His inspiration is encapsulated in one short sentence. “Your heart is my art.”

The Fruit Tree, a large-scale sculpture at Starfield Library inside COEX Department Store, Seoul, South Korea.

 

Works by the artist from the Land of the Morning Calm will be on show at the Bangkok Art and Cultural Center as well as Nai Lert Park Heritage Home and several department stores in Siam Square, Chidlom, and Rajprasong. Choi is to debut a collection of sculptures made from familiar materials that will put a smile on your face. Bring the smartphone and camera so you have something to share via social media.

“The Joker Crown” from Choi’s Happy Happy Project collection
“Love Me Pig 1” from the “Happy Happy Project
“The Inflatable Black Robot” from the Happy Happy Project
“The Inflatable Pink Flower”
“The Stupa” from the Happy Happy Project
“Happy Happy Project: Plastic Shotguns”
“Alchemy” an installation from the “Happy Happy Project

 

  1. HUANG YONG PING

One of the most famous Chinese avant-garde artists, Huang Yong Ping founded a movement called “Xiamen Dada”, which combined ideas from Dadaism (an art movement in early-20th-century Europe) with the influence of Zen Buddhism in the Eastern Hemisphere. The Chinese-born, French contemporary artist made his world debut at the 48th Venice Biennale in 1999. Since then, he has participated in many art exhibitions, from the Red Brick Art Museum in China to Ludwig Museum in Germany to Grand Palais in France.

For the Bangkok Art Biennale 2018, Huang will present “Dragon Boat”, a large sculptural work that tells stories of Chinese migration in times past. Portraying a rowboat of ancient China, the 16-meter artwork stands 4.2 meters tall. It will be on show at the Bank of Thailand Learning Center.

“Dragon Boat” a major attraction at the Bank of Thailand Learning Center
Sculptures with reduced mass details will be on display at Wat Pho.
  1. KAWITA VATANAJYANKUR

A rising star in Thailand’s art scene, Kawita Vatanajyankur uses video art to raise questions about issues concerning women’s rights. The artist puts herself through various situations as a means of demonstrating women’s roles in society. Her works portray a woman as part of machines, household chores, and industrial processes. The result is a collection of artworks in vivacious colors that have become her distinct identity. Kawita has exhibited at several art festivals around the world, among them the “Islands in the Stream”, which was part of the Venice Biennale 2018. The exhibition tour also took her to the Saatchi Gallery in London, and later the same year at the Thailand Eyes event at home.

For the Bangkok Art Biennale 2018, Kawita’s amazing works of art are on view at Central World, the EmQuartier Mall, the Peninsula Hotel, the Theatre of Indulgence, and the Asiatique Building. She sends a strong message: “It’s not easy being a woman.”

The “Shuttle and Performing Textiles” exhibition portrays a woman as shuttle carrying the weft thread between the warps on a loom.
A spinning wheel for making yarn and textile products.
The “Shuttle and Performing Textiles” exhibition portrays a woman as shuttle carrying the weft thread between the warps on a loom.
A piece portraying women’s roles in textile dying.

 

  1. WISUT PONNIMIT

The cartoonist who designed the cover for the 42nd Anniversary Edition of Baan Lae Suan Magazine (September 2018), Wisut Ponnimit is the creator of a series of animation art featuring adorable fictitious characters Miss Mamuang and her four-legged friend Manao.

For the Bangkok Art Biennale 2018, Wisut will present ten versions of animation art at Central World, the EmQuartier Mall, and the mega property project One Bangkok. If your love is art and animation, don’t miss out on it.

Miss Mamuang, the lovable character by animation artist Wusit Ponnimit, will debut at the Bangkok Art Biennale 2018.
Miss Mamuang, the lovable character by animation artist Wusit Ponnimit, will debut at the Bangkok Art Biennale 2018.  

This has been about six artists out of a total of 75 who exhibit at the Bangkok Art Biennale happening from October 19, 2018 to February 3, 2019. There are more stories on interesting people and events to come. Follow us at baanlaesuan.com and livingasean.com.

            The art exhibitions are being held at 20 locations across the capital.

Click here to download HD map.

 

The Making of the “Super Ung-Lo,” Ratchaburi’s Fuel-Efficient Cook Stove

The Making of the “Super Ung-Lo,” Ratchaburi’s Fuel-Efficient Cook Stove

The old-fashioned cook stove known as “Ung-Lo” has long been a manifestation of traditional knowledge of the people of Thailand. It’s fair to say that the charcoal stove can make food taste and smell better than can gas-fired cooking ranges. Precisely, nothing can replicate the natural smoky flavor of char. Nowadays, although the ubiquitous influence of gas-fired cooking ranges is felt by everybody, there’s always a demand for the charcoal stove. That said, we believe there’s at least one “Ung-Lo” in practically every household to meet every cooking need, whether it be barbecuing low and slow or cooking with high heat.

/// THAILAND///
Story: Trairat Songpao /// Photography: Kosol Paipoei

Ruam Sukhawattago is owner of “Gold Stoves,” an old manufacturing factory located in Ratchaburi Province. He kindly takes a break from work to show us around and share his experience. No doubt it’s an opportunity to observe traditional knowledge at work and see how the cloning process has evolved over time to fit modern circumstances. In the process, Ruam succeeds in crafting a fuel-efficient cook stove that he calls the “Super Ung-Lo.” The product is made from materials sourced directly from the community, such as clay and rice husk ash. In all, the handcrafted cook stove takes ten days from start to finish.

Super Ung-Lo Super Ung-Lo Super Ung-Lo

How It’s Made

First of all, clay goes through a curing process to become liquefied overnight. Then the soft clay is mixed with soil and rice husk ash. The ratio of soil to ash is 2:1. Work the moistened clay mix into paste with the hands until it’s thick and malleable enough to be molded to its final shape.

Let it cure for 12 hours before attaching three cooking pot supports to the inside wall of the fire chamber. The support points should be raised slightly higher than the mouth of a stove. Rub off the rough edges on the clay surface to give it a nice finish. Cut an opening in the lower part of the wall to make an air inlet. Then, let stand for five days before putting it in a kiln, where the clay stove becomes hardened by heat. 

Next is the making of a perforated clay brick or grill that separates the fire box from the ash chamber below. The lower room doubles as air inlet and ash removal port. The round grill prevents the fire from falling into the space underneath. Traditionally, a total of 61 holes are made while the brick is soft and easy to cut. The grill is fired at the same time as is the stove body.

From the kiln, the hardened earthenware is placed inside a metal casing for protection. The void space is filled with rice husk ash for heat insulation. Finally, it’s time to seal the top circumference with cement mix and install the perforated brick to complete the process.

Super Ung-Lo Super Ung-Lo

The “Super Ung-Lo” cook stove is designed to save fuel in line with the policy of the Department of Alternative Energy Development and Efficiency. It differs from traditional cook stoves in that:

  1. Shape: It’s perfectly shaped to store thermal energy in material by raising its temperatures.
  2. Stove top circumference: The stove mouth is capable of supporting 9 sizes of cooking pots (sizes 16-32)
  3. Support points: The three support points are raised above the top circumference only slightly to minimize heat loss.
  4. Fire chamber: Relatively speaking, its fire chamber is smaller than that of a traditional cook stove, which translates into less fuel being used.
  5. Grill: The perforated clay brick is made thicker for durability. Its efficiency comes from a forceful current of air that is pulled through many smaller holes using convection.

Super Ung-Lo Super Ung-Lo

Touring the factory, we come across so many cook stoves to the extent it gets us thinking about the future of the age-old industry. Will this occupation continue to have pride of place in modern circumstances? Interestingly enough, Ruam replies:

“At one time, the US Embassy invited me to join my counterparts from Laos and Vietnam for a meeting on Ung-Lo making in Vientiane. I represented Thailand in that event. At the time, many versions of cook stoves were discussed and compared in a bid to identify a design that produced the highest heat, had the least impact on the environment, and the most energy efficient. The Thai Ung-Lo proved to be the case. It started a fire in the least amount of time. By comparison, it produced the highest heat with water reaching the boiling point very quickly. In fact, the kettle boiled twice while the Vietnamese stove had only just started a fire.

“It turned out that theirs was a biofuel stove, which produced a lot of smoke. Experiments showed the Thai stove was made to a high quality standard. I couldn’t help wondering why the Americans were so interested in the Ung-Lo. Their answer was that 20 years from now, humans would have turned around to using traditional cook stoves due to natural gas being used up. Oils derived from petroleum would have been depleted less than 50 years from now, unlike wood which is a renewable product. So, now I understand.”

Super Ung-Lo

We came away feeling good knowing we have formed friendships and understanding with each other. It made us happy to go by the saying, “Whatever you do in life, do it for love.” Ruam Sukhawatago no doubt was of the same opinion.

For a chance to visit the “Gold Stoves” factory, or get yourself something good like a “Super Ung-Lo,” call 08-7977-8677 for information.

Source : www.baanlaesuan.com

 

Fascinating Works by Cambodian Artists

Fascinating Works by Cambodian Artists

Cambodia may not be the most vibrant art scene in the world. The country that’s known for the most iconic temple Angkor Wat is fast making its presence felt as an artistic destination. Inspired by a new sense of confidence, three Cambodian talents have risen to fame around the region and across the globe. Let’s meet them.

///CAMBODIA ///

Photo: crow collection

Sopheap Pich

Born in Battambang, Cambodia, Sopheap Pich moved with his family in 1984 to the United States, where he later graduated from the Art Institute of Chicago. He returned to Phnom Penh in 2002, and has been based there since. Pich is known for creating works of art using local methods and materials, such as bamboo, rattan, and earth pigments gathered from across the country. He also made sculptures inspired by bodily organs, vegetal forms, and abstract geometric structures. Among his masterpieces are “Reliefs” in 2013, “Compound” in 2011, and “Morning Glory” in 2011.

Sopheap has had exhibitions at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York), the Centre Georges Pompidou (Paris), the Guggenheim Museum (New York), the Singapore Biennial (Singapore) and the Venice Biennale 2017 (Italy).

photo: crow collection
Photo: www.sopheap-pich.com
Photo: designed for living

Link: http://sopheap-pich.com/work/

http://crowcollection.org/exhibition/hidden-nature-sopheap-pich/

http://www.designedforliving.com/editorial/finds/weaving-wonderment/

 


 

Visoth Kakvei

An illustrator who mixes abstract patterns, fantasy imagines, and doodle art in his own style, Visoth Kakvei created extraordinary art by simple black pen and presented it online as if it were everyday art from his sketch book. Nowadays, he has more than 850,000 followers on Instargram. Watching him draw is really an amazing experience.

 

 

Link: https://www.instagram.com/visothkakvei/


 

Lisa Mam

The first female street artist of Cambodia, Lisa Mam is one of the hottest emerging artists in Phnom Penh. She and her associate, Peap Tarr, presented Khmer patterns and ornaments in graffiti style. Lisa got her inspirations from ancient arts of the Angkor period, including ornaments at Angkor temple, the dancing Apsaras, and goddess sculptures. Her works have been on view not only at Boeung Kak and hotels in Phnom Penh, but also at the art gallery Lotus Arts de Vivre, the discotheque Bed Supperclub, the hip hotel Cacha, and the premier shopping center Siam Discovery in Bangkok. The Cambodian artist duo also produced the street clothing brand “REPTILE”.

Lisa Mam’s work at Starbucks flagship store in Phnom Penh

 

Link: https://www.facebook.com/LisaMamArt/

 

ALIVE by Alex Face

ALIVE by Alex Face

Alex Face is a remarkable Thai street artist. Now, he is revealing the perspective of his art in his latest exhibition, “ALIVE”.

/// Thailand ///
Story: Wuthikorn Suthiapa /// Rewrite – Translate: Osatee Ularangkoon ///  Photos: NathawutPengkamphoo, Wuthikorn Suthiapa

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Street art has achieved recognition on the Thai art scene over the past decade. The leading artist in this genre is Patcharapol Tangruen, also known as Alex Face. He created the three-eyed baby in fluffy bunny outfit character that appeared on the walls across Bangkok, Jakarta, Tokyo, Seoul, Taipei, London, Copenhagen, Amsterdam and Berlin.

While he was an art student, his friends and professors didn’t understand why he kept spraying in public space, and thought it was ridiculous. But Alex Face disagreed. “Street painting is a kind of expression and could draw many audiences,” he said. “If it’s hard for people to engage with art, we should take it to engage with people instead.”

With that idea in mind, Alex Face hit the street with his colorful graffiti and the signature character that was inspired by his daughter. He also met fellow street artists from around the world, got the invitations to work abroad, and became an internationally-renowned street artist.

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“I studied art, so I’m interested in all kinds of art,” Alex Face answered when asked about his style of work. “Not only did I graffiti, I’ve also painted, printed and sculpted. I like it all. It depends on which techniques could be compatible with my concepts.” He also said that he set up “ALIVE”, his most recent event, to show his art experience from childhood till now.

“You will see what skills I had practiced, and encounter different kinds of works of art that you’ve never seen before,” he assured.

Alex Face’s ALIVE is taking place at Bangkok CityCity Gallery until February 19, 2017. For more information please visit www. bangkokcitycity.com.

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Sirimongkol: A Spiritual Art Exhibition By Pomme Chan

Sirimongkol: A Spiritual Art Exhibition By Pomme Chan

Bid farewell to 2016 and ring in the New Year with Sirimongkol, an exhibition of works by celebrated illustrator Pomme Chan. The artist got her inspirations from the twelve signs of the Zodiac, which in the Chinese belief system are thought to have profound influences on us humans. The event is on from now until February 12, 2107 at the Jam Factory.

/// Thailand ///

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The spiritual art exhibition is appropriately named “Sirimongkol,” which is Thai for good omens or positive energies believed to foretell the future. Pomme Chan’s masterpieces depict the twelve signs representing the constellations that form the imaginary belt of the heavens. To make it easy to appreciate, the exhibition comes in four parts.

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The first part consists of illustrated works on canvas depicting the 12 animal signs of the Chinese Zodiac. Each sign comes accompanied by floral and botanical ornaments that speak to basic character, preferences, strengths, and weaknesses of individuals.

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The second part is quite a striking collection. Using hand-drawn techniques on paper, the artist lets red and gold play a prominent role in her contemporary interpretation of the Zodiac signs. Sharp geometric shapes blends well with curves and brush strokes from Chinese calligraphy and other symbols of wealth, success, luck, and power.

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The third part is three-dimensional showcasing a futuristic spirit house. The 3D shrine is crafted of clear acrylic sheets illuminated by LED lighting, a collaborative effort between Pomme Chan and interior designer Pruitsatorn Sakulthai. Finally, the fourth part comprises illustrated works printed on 10 porcelain plates and mounted on frames to focus on the meaning of “Sirimongkol” as we know it. May 2017 bring happiness and prosperity to you all.

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Exhibition period: Now – February 12, 2017.
Location: The Jam Factory

For more information, visit www.facebook.com/thejamfactorybangkok

About the artist

Pomme Chan is a Thai illustrator based in London. Her feminine style and detailed illustrated works are recognized worldwide. She has been working with various leading brands and magazines, including Marc Jacobs, Nike, Adidas, Volkswagens, and The New York Times. She is moving back in Thailand, where she has a studio of her own.

“Silver Fermentation” and “Glided Blue”:  Dual Art Exhibitions by Landry Dunand

“Silver Fermentation” and “Glided Blue”: Dual Art Exhibitions by Landry Dunand

Landry Dunand is a French photographer, who has come to call Thailand home. Having traveled extensively, from France to Afghanistan to Thailand, he captured moments of people’s lives and local cultures through his film cameras. Dunand will be sharing his years of experience in two concurrent art exhibitions, which art lovers shouldn’t miss.

/// Thailand ///

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The dual art exhibitions, “Silver Fermentation” and “Glided Blue,” will be held at the Neilson Hays library throughout this December. Interestingly, both of them are in monochromic tones.

“Glided Blue” is a collection of cyanotypes. The cyan blue photos are produced by placing a negative or an object directly on a coated paper, and let the sunlight through. The traditional photographic process can be dated back to the 18th century.

“Silver Fermentation” is a series of silver gelatin prints. Dunand developed all the photos himself in his home darkroom.

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For Dunand, his main inspirations are people, the nature and its constant changing conditions. His photos are mostly of people in Thai local villages and their natural surroundings. “All of the works presented here are heavily influenced by my environment. I live in a village, where nature is extremely present. I can feel and see nature growing and dying around me. The weather and time makes it constantly evolve. So I get a lot of inspirations from nature and local life.”

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“People are still living in nature here. Most of the aunties around me are cultivating their yards for daily needs. Every morning you can see people picking up Dok Anchan (butterfly peas), collecting coconut for the milk and meat, fishing for dinner, and growing various vegetables. I like the self-sustaining life, where what is around is enough to live. People can live much simpler, more peaceful life when they are not distracted by consumerist environments.”

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The outcomes of interesting topics and unusual techniques culminated in these wonderful monochromic photos, which art lovers shouldn’t miss.

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Singapore Biennale 2016: An Atlas of Mirrors

Singapore Biennale 2016: An Atlas of Mirrors

How do we view ourselves and the world? This is the question and the core of Singapore Biennale 2016. Through views of 63 selected artists from Southeast Asia, East Asia and South Asia, Singapore Biennale 2016 invites everyone to discover intertwining worlds like you have never seen before.

/// Singapore ///

Photos: Singapore Art Museum

SAMSUNG CSC

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SAMSUNG CSC

Throughout the period of four months (October 27, 2016 – February 26, 2017), talks, workshops and exhibition are being held at museums and art galleries across Singapore. Following are some of the highlighted works you wouldn’t want to miss.

 

Fantasy map reflects a fraction from Indonesia history. – Treasure Islands by Made Wianda (Indonesia)
Fantasy map reflects a fraction from Indonesia history. – Treasure Islands by Made Wianda (Indonesia)

 

Fantasy, imagination and history cross path in many exhibitions. Made Wianta, an Indonesian artist looks back to the colonial chapter in Indonesia history with buffalo leather maps. The orange-gold color of buffalo leather and glistening mirrors and nails depict abundant Indonesia’s spices and nutmegs during the colonial era.

Inscription of the Island by Lim Soo Ngee (Singapore)
Inscription of the Island by Lim Soo Ngee (Singapore)

 

Lim Soo Ngee creates a Singapore mythical story beyond the history. According to his imaginary myth, a gigantic left hand sculpture once belonged to a statue, which was guiding the way to a ship of civilization. The statue collapsed. Since then, the left hand has been turning into a sundial for Singaporean people.

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Kra-Tua Taeng Seua by Sakarin Krue-On (Thailand)
Kra-Tua Taeng Seua by Sakarin Krue-On (Thailand)

 

Another mythical-themed work is by a Thai artist. Moved by “Kra-Tua Taeng Seua,” Southern Thailand folklore about a tiger hunt, which was once popular but currently could barely survive in a contemporary world, Sakarin Krue-On produced a live performance, a silent film and behind-the-scene documentary.

 

 

 

For Singapore Art Museum

 

These eyes are both beautiful and haunting. – Karagatan by Gregory Halili (The Philippines)
These eyes are both beautiful and haunting. – Karagatan by Gregory Halili (The Philippines)

 

Karagatan (The Breadth of Oceans) is more of a realistic piece. The artwork will look right back at you while you are observing. Eyes of coastal villagers in the Philippines are carved and painted on mother of pearl shells to show their connections to the sea and to pay homage to those whose lives and fates are tied to the ocean.

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The larger-than-life piece of art uses incense sticks to represent different human beings. – Growing by Hemali Bhuta (India)
The larger-than-life piece of art uses incense sticks to represent different human beings. – Growing by Hemali Bhuta (India)

 

Big ideas are also at play here. One example is Hemela Bhuta’s work. From India, Bhuta’s Growing is a large hanging installation piece made mainly from incense sticks of different fragrance. Each stick represents a human being. Each one is different, yet we are facing birth, growth and death just the same. It also reflects the idea of human species as a small part of Nature.

Drop by for a visit at Singapore Biennale 2016, and you will certainly witness novel and thoughtful points of view and maybe develop one of your own.

 

“Enter the Parallel World” by H.H. Lim (Malaysia) comprises two recordings of his performance -- one of his 30-minute-long body balance on a basketball, and the other of his countless failures that led to the success.
“Enter the Parallel World” by H.H. Lim (Malaysia) comprises two recordings of his performance — one of his 30-minute-long body balance on a basketball, and the other of his countless failures that led to the success.

 

One’s reflection is distorted and changeable in this ever-flowing framed petroleum painting. – Good Boy, Bad Boy by Chou Shih Hsiung (Taiwan)
One’s reflection is distorted and changeable in this ever-flowing framed petroleum painting. – Good Boy, Bad Boy by Chou Shih Hsiung (Taiwan)

 

The arrival of the Japanese army in Java is shown through the projection of two images on a fabric screen. – Dollah Jawa by Faizal Hamdan (Brunei)
The arrival of the Japanese army in Java is shown through the projection of two images on a fabric screen. – Dollah Jawa by Faizal Hamdan (Brunei)

 

A night sky in Singapore is precisely recreated in this detailed artwork. – Dust by Ni Youyu (China)
A night sky in Singapore is precisely recreated in this detailed artwork. – Dust by Ni Youyu (China)

 

This spectacular light and sound installation work draws the relationship between humans and the sea. – Endless Hours at Sea by Martha Athienza (The Philippines)
This spectacular light and sound installation work draws the relationship between humans and the sea. – Endless Hours at Sea by Martha Athienza (The Philippines)

 

The idea of heaven and earth blends with the concept of the Armageddon. The artist translates traditional Thai beliefs into modern mural-like works. – Aftermath by Pannaphan Yodmanee (Thailand)
The idea of heaven and earth blends with the concept of the Armageddon. The artist translates traditional Thai beliefs into modern mural-like works. – Aftermath by Pannaphan Yodmanee (Thailand)
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